University of Chicago. School of Social Service Administration. Office of the Dean. Harold Richman. Records 1927-1978

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University of Chicago. School of Social Service Administration. Office of the Dean. Harold Richman. Records, 1927-1978

University of Chicago. School of Social Service Administration. Office of the Dean. Harold Richman. Records 1927-1978

Founded in 1920, the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration prepares students for leadership in fields of social work. As one of the university's professional schools, SSA offers graduate-level coursework leading to master's and doctoral degrees. The collection consists of the records of the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration. Records span 1927-1978, but are concentrated in the years 1969-1978, when Harold Richman served as Dean of SSA. There is correspondence of the dean and assistant and associate deans; files on research administration and fundraising; records of SSA's relationships with social work organizations and government agencies; records of the school's administration of the Center for the Study of Welfare Policy and the Woodlawn Social Services Center; files on alumni relations; faculty and committee meeting materials; files on curriculum development; statistics and surveys on the experiences of students and alumni; faculty biographical information; teaching materials; drafts of speeches and articles; and editorial files of the SSA faculty newsletter.

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Related Entities

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Richman, Harold, 1937-

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Founded in 1920, the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration prepares students for leadership in fields of social work. As one of the university's professional schools, SSA offers graduate-level coursework leading to master's and doctoral degrees. Early deans of SSA led the school from its founding as an experimental program that stressed social research and theoretical studies, into its establishment as a model for innovative social work education and a nati...

Council on Social Work Education

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Formed in 1952, the Council formulates criteria and standards for all levels of social work education, accredits graduate schools of social work, provides service on curriculum development and teaching methodologies, publishes teaching materials, conducts research, and compiles data on social work education. From the description of Council on Social Work Education : [microfilm], 1930-1963. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 63300134 From the guide to...

University of Chicago. School of Social Service Administration.

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The Work Incentive Program (WIN) was established by the U.S. Department of Labor in 1967-1968. WIN was designed to increase employability and employment among those receiving welfare under Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). It required states to offer job training and job-seeking assistance. A voluntary program until 1971, incentives for participation ranged from exemptions in calculating AFDC need to actual incentive payments. WIN programs were federally funded and loc...

University of Chicago. Woodlawn Social Services Center

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The Woodlawn Social Services Center (also known as SSC, or the Social Services Center) was a branch of the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Social Service Administration. Founded in 1920 to continue the work of the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy, SSA had became a model for innovation in social work education by the 1960s.The establishment of the SSC in 1969 represented one such initiative, combining professional education and research with social welfare in Chic...

United States., Department of Health, Education and Welfare

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In March 1972 President Richard Nixon called for an "intensive study" and requested a plan for developing a "safe, fast, and efficient nationwide blood collection and distribution system." Nixon's request was the result of several independent events and initiatives throughout the late 1960s that focused on the U.S. lack of an efficient system for maintaining a sufficiently ample, risk-free national blood supply. The primary aim of the policy was to eliminate the nation's dependence on an oft-con...