General Records of the Department of State, 1763 - 2002. Letters Received, 1789 - 1906

ArchivalResource

General Records of the Department of State, 1763 - 2002. Letters Received, 1789 - 1906

General Records of the Department of State, 1763 - 2002. Letters Received, 1789 - 1906

1789-1906

This series consists of original letters, with related enclosures, received by the Department of State from sources other than U.S. and foreign diplomatic and consular officers. This series covers a wide range of subjects relating to both domestic and international affairs.

150 linear feet

eng, Latn

Related Entities

There are 17 Entities related to this resource.

Crawford, William Harris, 1772-1834

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6c06wf3 (person)

William Harris Crawford (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an American politician and judge during the early 19th century. He served as United States Secretary of War and United States Secretary of the Treasury before running for president in the 1824 election. Born in Virginia, Crawford moved to Georgia at a young age. After studying law, Crawford won election to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1803. He aligned with the Democratic-Republican Party and U.S. Senator James Jac...

Scott, Winfield, 1786-1866

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6wx874x (person)

Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was an American military commander and political candidate. He served as a general in the United States Army from 1814 to 1861, taking part in the War of 1812, the Mexican–American War, the early stages of the American Civil War, and various conflicts with Native Americans. Scott was the Whig Party's presidential nominee in the 1852 presidential election, but was defeated by Democrat Franklin Pierce. He was known as Old Fuss and Feathers for his insi...

Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w61p8qjx (person)

Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer, politician, and statesman. He represented Michigan in the United States Senate and served in the Cabinets of two U.S. Presidents, Andrew Jackson and James Buchanan. He was also the 1848 Democratic presidential nominee and a leading spokesman for the Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, which held that the people in each territory should decide whether to permit slavery. Born in Exeter, New Hampshire, he attended Philli...

Mangum, Willie Person, 1792-1861

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jr1qdt (person)

Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792 – September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. He was one of the founders and leading members of the Whig party, and was a candidate for president in 1836 as part of the unsuccessful Whig strategy to defeat Martin Van Buren by running four candidates with local appeal in different regions of the country. He is, as of 2020, the only major-party presidential nominee to have been a North Ca...

Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth, 1746-1825

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62p5rp9 (person)

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (February 25, 1746 – August 16, 1825) was an early American statesman of South Carolina, Revolutionary War veteran, and delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was twice nominated by the Federalist Party as its presidential candidate in 1804 and 1808, losing both elections. Pinckney was born into a powerful family of aristocratic planters. He practiced law for several years and was elected to the colonial legislature. A supporter of independence from Great Br...

King, Rufus, 1755-1827

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6fz80vr (person)

Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. He was a delegate for Massachusetts to the Continental Congress and the Philadelphia Convention and was one of the signers of the United States Constitution in 1787. After formation of the new Congress he represented New York in the United States Senate. He emerged as a leading member of the Federalist Party, serving as the party's last presidential nominee in the 1816 presidential election. The son...

Clinton, DeWitt, 1769-1828

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6zx29c7 (person)

DeWitt Clinton (March 2, 1769 – February 11, 1828) was an American politician and naturalist who served as a United States Senator, Mayor of New York City and sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity, he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal. Clinton was a major candidate for the American presidency in the election of 1812, challenging incumbent James Madison. A nephew of long-time New York Governor George Clinton, DeWitt Clinton served as his uncle's secreta...

Morton, Levi P. (Levi Parsons), 1824-1920

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tg0mrd (person)

Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920) was the 22nd vice president of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He also served as United States ambassador to France, as a US representative from New York, and as the 31st governor of New York. The son of a Congregational minister, Morton was born in Vermont and educated in Vermont and Massachusetts. He trained for a business career by clerking in stores and working in mercantile establishments in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. After rel...

Dallas, George Mifflin, 1792-1864

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ch0dh3 (person)

George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792 – December 31, 1864) was an American politician and diplomat who served as mayor of Philadelphia from 1828 to 1829 and as the 11th vice president of the United States from 1845 to 1849. The son of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander J. Dallas, George Dallas attended elite preparatory schools before embarking on a legal career. He served as the private secretary to Albert Gallatin and worked for the Treasury Department and the Second Bank of the United Stat...

Johnson, Richard M. (Richard Mentor), 1780-1850

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6mx36kz (person)

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a politician and the ninth vice president of the United States from 1837 to 1841. He is the only vice president elected by the United States Senate under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment. Johnson also represented Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate; he began and ended his political career in the Kentucky House of Representatives. Johnson was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1806 in the...

Calhoun, John C. (John Caldwell), 1782-1850

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6rp3z99 (person)

John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority states' rights in politics. He did this in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when its residents were outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, mo...

Tompkins, Daniel D., 1774-1825

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w61656gv (person)

Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an American politician. He was the fourth governor of New York from 1807 to 1817, and the sixth vice president of the United States from 1817 to 1825. Born in Scarsdale, New York, Tompkins practiced law in New York City after graduating from Columbia College. He was a delegate to the 1801 New York constitutional convention and served on the New York Supreme Court from 1804 to 1807. In 1807, he defeated incumbent Morgan Lewis to become the...

Clinton, George, 1739-1812

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w68q6pwr (person)

George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and statesman, considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A prominent Democratic-Republican, Clinton served as the fourth vice president of the United States from 1805 until his death in 1812. He also served as governor of New York from 1777 to 1795 and from 1801 to 1804. Along with John C. Calhoun, he is one of two vice presidents to hold office under two presidents. Clinton served in the French and Ind...

Burr, Aaron, 1756-1836

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6nx07m0 (person)

Aaron Burr Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an American politician and lawyer. A Founding Father, he served as the third vice president of the United States during President Thomas Jefferson's first term from 1801 to 1805. His role in helping form the nation, however, would be overshadowed when he killed fellow Founding Father Alexander Hamilton in an 1804 duel. The duel led to the collapse of Burr's political career and tarnished his legacy in American history. Burr was born t...

Trumbull, Jonathan, 1740-1809

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62627m7 (person)

Jonathan Trumbull Jr. (March 26, 1740 – August 7, 1809) was an American politician who served as the 20th governor of Connecticut and the second Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. Trumbull was born in Lebanon, Connecticut, the second son of Jonathan Trumbull Sr. (the eventual Governor of Connecticut) and his wife Faith Robinson, daughter of Rev. John Robinson. Trumbull graduated from Harvard College in 1759, and gave the valedictory address when he received his master's de...

Dayton, Jonathan, 1760-1824

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w65z308r (person)

Jonathan Dayton (October 16, 1760 – October 9, 1824) was an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. He was the youngest person to sign the United States Constitution and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, serving as its third Speaker, and later in the U.S. Senate. Dayton was arrested in 1807 for treason in connection with Aaron Burr's conspiracy. He was never tried, but his national political career never recovered. Dayton was born in Elizabethtown (now known as Eli...

Sedgwick, Theodore, 1746-1813

http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w69m51nn (person)

Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746 – January 24, 1813) was an American attorney, politician and jurist, who served in elected state government and as a Delegate to the Continental Congress, a U.S. Representative, and a United States Senator from Massachusetts. He served as the fourth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. He was appointed to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1802 and served there the rest of his life. Born in West Hartford in the Connecticut Colony, Sedg...