Grünwald, Alfred

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Alfred Grunwald was born in Vienna, Austria, on February 16, 1884. He worked for a theatrical agency before turning to libretto writing. He came to the United States in 1940 after several years' residence in France. During World War II he was employed for a time with the Office of War Information translating American songs for transmission by radio to Germany Alfred Grunwald collaborated with such composers as Franz Lahar and Emmerich Kalman, successfully adding a modern social slant to the traditional operetta formula. A number of Grunwald’s librettos were produced on Broadway. These included Countess Maritza (1926), The Yankee Princess (1922), The Circus Princess (1927), and The Duchess of Chicago (1929). He also wrote a number of comedies, including Dancing Partner (1930), written in collaboration with Alexander Engel and produced on Broadway by David Belasco. Besides writing over 40 operetta librettos, Alfred Grunwald also wrote non-musical plays, short stories, and newspaper articles, and was the theater critic for the Neue Wiener Journal . He was a member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Alfred Grunwald died in New York on February 24, 1951.

From the guide to the Alfred Grunwald papers, 1907-2004, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

Austrian-born librettist, writer, and theater critic, Alfred Grunwald (1884-1951) wrote the librettos for over forty operettas, collaborating with such prominent composers as Franz Lehár and Emmerich Kálmán.

Born in Vienna, Austria, Grunwald also served as a theater critic for the Neues Wiener Journal (1930-1938). He worked for a theatrical agency before turning to writing for the Viennese stage; he also wrote non-musical plays and short stories. As a librettist, Grunwald successfully added a modern social slant to the traditional operetta formula. Among those shows authored (or co-authored) by Grunwald, which later were produced on Broadway, are: Kálmán's The Yankee Princess (1922), Countess Maritza (1926), and The Circus Princess (1927). He also wrote a number of comedies, including Dancing Partner (1930), which was co-written with Alexander Engel and produced on Broadway by David Belasco. Secular Jews, Grunwald and his family were forced to flee Austria after the Nazi rise to power. He eventually arrived in the United States in 1940, settling in New York. During World War II he was employed for a time with the Office of War Information translating the lyrics of American songs into German for transmission by radio to Germany. Grunwald's son Henry would become a noted journalist, advancing to the position of managing editor of Time magazine.

From the description of Alfred Grunwald papers, 1907-2004. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 155847754

Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Beer, Gustav, b. 1888. person
associatedWith Belasco, David, 1853-1931. person
associatedWith Engel, Alexander, 1868-1940. person
associatedWith Engel, Alexander, 1869- person
associatedWith Granville, Fred Leroy, b. 1886. person
correspondedWith Grunwald, Henry A. (Henry Anatole) person
correspondedWith Kálmán, Emmerich, 1882-1953 person
associatedWith Lehár, Franz, 1870-1948. person
associatedWith Robinson, Armin L., 1900-1985. person
associatedWith Stolz, Robert, 1880-1975. person
associatedWith Winterberg, Robert. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
Austria--Vienna
Austria
Subject
Librettists--United States
Librettists
Theater critics--Austria--Vienna
Librettists--Austria
Dramatists, Austrian
Operetta--Production and direction
Drama--Promptbooks and typescripts
Musical comedies--Stories, plots, etc
Theater critics
Operetta--Librettos
Drama (German)--Translations into English
Occupation
Librettists
Dramatists
Theater critics
Function

Person

Active 1907

Active 2004

German,

English

Information

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