Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board

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The International Board of Women's and Young Women's Christian Associations and the American Committee of Young Women's Christian Associations merged to form the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of the U.S.A. in 1906.

From the description of National Board predecessors and formation of National Board, 1876-1961. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 84462658

Women's advocacy and social service organization.

In the mid-nineteenth century women's organizations were formed to meet the needs of young, single women in cities who were seeking work, job training, housing, recreation, and moral support. Two such organizations formed separately in New York City (1858) and Boston (1860), and they soon became the first Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). The YWCA began by providing services for women seeking employment in industrial cities. Soon it developed programs for professional and rural women. The first African American branch was formed in Dayton, Ohio in 1889. The YWCA organized the first interracial conference ever held in the Southern states of the U.S., in Louisville, Kentucky. Services to Native Americans, beginning in 1890, concentrated on teens and students. The Board organized International Institutes in 1911 to provide services for immigrant women. A foreign department supervised American YWCA secretaries working in China, India, Japan, and Argentina. Other services involved work with college students and war work. The National Board has actively supported disarmament, development of economic opportunities for all ethnic and racial groups and civil liberties for individuals. Other social action targets have been employment security, unemployment insurance, and prohibition of child labor, equality in housing, and the elimination of institutional racism.

From the description of Records, 1876-1970 [microform]. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 57415795

As the United States prepared to enter World War II, the general public and many leading social service agencies voiced the need for expanded social services in coordination with the U.S. military. In 1940 General George Marshall also called for social services for the military. Discussions among the military, the National Jewish Welfare Board, the Salvation Army, the National Board of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA), the National Council of the Young Men's Christian Associations of the United States (YMCA), and the National Catholic Community Service resulted in the establishment of the United Service Organizations for National Defense Inc. (USO) in New York City on February 4, 1941. In the following month, the National Traveler's Aid Association joined the organization and thus these groups became the six primary member agencies of the USO.

The war stimulated the growth of the USO and by 1943 the USO had eighty-eight facilities abroad and approximately one hundred service centers in the United States. In March 1944 the USO reached its peak number of service centers with 3,035 clubs. That year the USO began its hospital program in which artists sketched wounded patients and started the USO camp shows at Veterans Administration hospitals; it evolved into one of the USO's most popular programs.

With the end of the war in 1945, the USO curtailed its operations. On December 31, 1947 all USO operations ceased and in January 1948 the USO dissolved and in February overseas operations ceased. However, this cessation proved to be short-lived and one year later President Harry Truman reinstated the USO, but by early 1950 the USO shut down again because it had trouble securing funding. With the Korean War looming, government defense officials, the National Social Welfare Assembly, the six USO member agencies, and the USO-affiliated but now independent Camp Shows, Inc. pushed to reestablish the USO permanently on March 27, 1951. The "new" or "second" USO joined the United Defense Fund, Inc. to help raise funds.

When the Korean War ended in 1953, this did not signal the demise of the USO as the end of World War II had. Instead the USO expanded in the 1950s and 1960s. In the 1950s the USO strengthened their fund raising, public relations, and social services. With the military buildup in Southeast Asia in the 1960s, the USO began a new era. All USO facilities became racially integrated in 1963. In addition, an outside ad hoc survey committee evaluated USO operations in 1962. The committee, chaired by Dr. John A. Hannah, president of Michigan State University, presented its findings to the executive committee of the USO. In 1964 the USO adopted many recommendations for drastic USO curtailments, limiting USO service centers to only the largest U.S. military communities. Unlike the shrinking number of domestic service centers, USO services expanded in the 1960s in Vietnam, Japan, and Thailand. When the hostilities in Southeast Asia ended, the USO focused on helping returning soldiers adjust to postwar life and expanding domestic community services, including substance abuse and minority services programs.

YWCA participation. As suggested above, the National Board of the YWCA was intimately involved with USO operations since the pre-World War II era. Before direct U.S. involvement in the war, the YWCA had supported its own National Defense Program, which distributed clothing and supplies to refugees in Europe and supported all Allied efforts short of war. From the beginning, the YWCA insisted that USO programs address women's needs, not merely as an adjunct of men's programs but as independent services for female war production workers. In March 1942, the National Board of the YWCA accorded "division" status to USO activities; it formed a USO Division Committee with subcommittees on personnel, finance, and counseling.

Generally regional and headquarters YWCA staff worked together in local USO clubs, attempting to avoid conflict by limiting staff division or hierarchy and by focusing on mutual concerns and goals. Moving beyond the traditional YWCA areas of emphasis (housing, food service, casework, employment, placement, and vocational training), the YWCA focused on race relations in YWCA service centers and in the larger service community. During the 1940s and 1950s, the YWCA opposed the USO's policy of operating racially segregated clubs.

In 1947 when the USO officially ended operations, the YWCA and the other USO member agencies continued operating service centers and providing services to the military with USO funds. Generally there was no break in services between the "first" and "second" USO's. In July 1948, the six member agencies (YWCA, YMCA, SA, JWB, NCCS, and NTAA) formed a reactivated Conference of Executives. At this time, the president of the National Board of the YWCA, Mrs. Arthur Forrest Anderson, informed all community YWCA's of the reorganization of the "new" or "second" USO.

During the 1950s, the YWCA continued to operate service centers with the USO, providing services to people in the armed forces, their families, and workers in the defense industries. The YWCA's specific areas of expertise included working with service women and junior volunteers. The YWCA recruited, trained, and used thousands of teenagers in USO clubs or in on-post programs and helped the U.S. military with women's issues. Within local communities, spouses of service personnel looked to the YWCA for assistance. According to servicemen of the time, YWCA involvement in USO clubs gave clubs a "homelike, caring" atmosphere.

The USO expanded its overseas services during the 1960s, while reducing its domestic programs. During this time, local affiliates on occasion worked against the national organization as local leadership changed frequently and thus was at times unappreciative of the national organization. Local and national service organizations competed intensely for local community funds. In 1961 a struggle arose between the USO and its member agencies, which now included the original six members and the Camp Shows, Inc. At issue were the control of administrative operations and the balance between service programs and entertainment activities. The YWCA and other member agencies wanted to have more control over operations abroad and to reduce USO responsibility for entertainment shows. Most important, the YWCA and other member agencies wanted the USO to establish clear priorities. To accomplish this, the USO promoted the national ad hoc surveys, mentioned above. In the 1970s, YWCA and USO began to reduce their services overseas and again focused more on domestic services for returning military personnel.

(This history relies heavily on the essay titled, "United Service Organization, Inc. (USO)," in Peter Romanofsky's Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Institutions: Social Service Organizations, volume 2, 1978.)

From the guide to the YWCA National Board / United Service Organizations records, 1941-1975, (University of Minnesota Libraries. Social Welfare History Archives [swha])

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Records, 1876-1970 [microform]. Smith College, Neilson Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Scrapbooks, 1880-1967, 1914-1945 (bulk) Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Mitchell, Ruth Crawford, 1890-. Papers, 1916-1978, 1916-1917. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
referencedIn Dodge, Grace H. (Grace Hoadley), 1856-1914. Papers, [ca. 1874-1914]. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Photographs, 1890-1986, 1906-1986 (bulk) Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Minutes and reports, 1884-1962. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn YWCA National Board / United Service Organizations records, 1941-1975. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
referencedIn Ruth Crawford Mitchell Papers, 1916-1978 University of Minnesota Libraries. Immigration History Research Center [ihrc]
creatorOf Warne, Frances. Papers, 1954-1968. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Posters, [ca. 1914]-1986. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. National Board predecessors and formation of National Board, 1876-1961. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf YWCA National Board / United Service Organizations records, 1941-1975 University of Minnesota Libraries. Social Welfare History Archives
referencedIn Ursula Griswold Bingham papers, 1882-1998 Bancroft Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Subject files, 1899-1970. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Pim, Eleanora Davis, 1918-. Papers 1962-1968. Smith College, Neilson Library
referencedIn Harriet Bliss Ford Papers MS 59., 1899-1953 Sophia Smith Collection
creatorOf Bingham, Ursula Griswold, 1908-1996. Ursula Griswold Bingham papers, 1882-1998. UC Berkeley Libraries
referencedIn Pickens, William, 1881-1954. William Pickens papers (Additions), 1909-1950. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn Ford, Harriet Bliss, 1876-1964. Papers, 1899-1953. Smith College, Neilson Library
referencedIn Hastings, Jane Hope, 1902-. Papers, 1941-1997 (inclusive). Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Special collections, 1871-1970, 1906-1960 (bulk) Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
referencedIn William Pickens papers (Additions), 1909-1950 The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Local association files, 1884-1970. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. [A collection of pamphlets issued by the National Board of the Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America, in New York, N.Y.]. New-York Historical Society
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Bingham, Ursula Griswold, 1908-1996. person
associatedWith Boyd, Kate Hillis. person
associatedWith Dodge, Grace Hoadley. person
associatedWith Ford, Harriet Bliss, 1876-1964 person
associatedWith Foster, J. Ellen 1840- person
associatedWith Griffith, J. S., Mrs. person
associatedWith Hastings, Jane Hope, 1902- person
associatedWith Hays, Emma. person
associatedWith Hendee, Elizabeth Russell. person
associatedWith Jobs Corps (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith Johns, Elizabeth. person
associatedWith MacKinlay, Margaret. person
associatedWith McCulloch, Rhoda. person
associatedWith Mitchell, Ruth Crawford, 1890- person
associatedWith Pickens, William, 1881-1954. person
associatedWith Pim, Eleanora Davis, 1918- person
associatedWith Reynolds, Annie M. person
associatedWith Stokes, Olivia Phelps. person
associatedWith Taylor, Harriet. person
associatedWith Thurston, Frank, Mrs. person
associatedWith United Service Organizations (U.S.) corporateBody
associatedWith United War Campaign. corporateBody
associatedWith Warne, Frances. person
associatedWith Womans Press. corporateBody
associatedWith Women's and Young Women's Christian Associations. International Board. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association. National Board. Business Women Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association. National Board. Industrial Women Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association. National Board. International Institutes. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. American War Community Services. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. Central Club for Nurses. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. Girl Reserves. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. Latin American Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Board of Trustees. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Field Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. International Conference of Women Physicians, 1919. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. State Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Summer Youth Demonstration Project. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. Territorial Committee. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. National Board. War Brides Program. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Association of the U.S.A. Y-Teens. corporateBody
associatedWith Young Women's Christian Associations. American Committee. corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
Korea
Soviet Union
South America
United States
Japan
France
China
United States
United States
Korea
United States
North America
China
United States
Latin America
South America
United States
Poland
Africa
India
Europe
United States
United States
New York (N.Y.)
India
Soviet Union
United States
South America
Africa
Japan
Belgium
Subject
African Americans
African American women
African American women
Agriculture
Businesswomen
Businesswomen
Church camps
Civil rights
College students
Health education
Family social work
Food service
Girls
Health
Indian women
International relations
Japanese Americans
Japanese Americans
Medicine
Military social work
Nurses
Nutrition
Occupational training for women
Philanthropists
Physical education and training
Women physicians
Political refugees
Race relations
Recreation
Social group work
Social service
Social service
Social service and race relations
Social service, Rural
Social work and race relations
Social workers
Social work with children
Social work with immigrants
Social work with women
Social work with youth
Sports
Student movements
World War, 1914-1918
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women
Women and peace
Women household employees
Women immigrants
Women in charitable work
Women in the professions
Women philanthropists
Women publishers
Women volunteers in social service
World War, 1939-1945
World War, 1939-1945
World War, 1939-1945
World War, 1939-1945
Young Women's Christian associations
Occupation
Activity

Corporate Body

Active 1882

Active 1998

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