Keleher, William Aloysius, 1886-1972

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William Aloysius Keleher was born November 7, 1886 in Lawrence, Kansas to David Keleher and Mary Ann (Gorry) Keleher. Three years later, the family moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico where William enrolled at St. Mary's Parochial School. He studied there until 1900 when he began work as a messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company. Although he started as a counter clerk, he quickly moved up to telegraph operator. For several years following, William tried his hand at different careers working for a short time for the Bluewater Development Company and later for the local Board of Education. The writing skills he exhibited while in that position attracted the attention of local newspapermen and in 1908 he began work as a newspaper reporter. Over time, he wrote for and later acted as city editor for both the Albuquerque Journal and Albuquerque Evening Herald. While working as a reporter he met many well known New Mexicans including Elfego Baca. Also during this time, he became interested in law while observing the events at the Bernalillo County Courthouse. By 1913, he was a law student at Washington and Lee Law School in Virginia. After only two years in law school, he received his Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1915 and was admitted to the New Mexico bar in August of that same year. Shortly after returning to Albuquerque, Keleher found work as city attorney. Following his tenure as city attorney, he joined a legal practice with George S. Downer which operated until 1930. In 1931, Keleher founded another practice with A. Howell McLeod. That successful firm still exists today. Outside of his law practice, William A. Keleher was an active citizen of New Mexico. He served as chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee of New Mexico for several years beginning in 1928. In 1932, Governor Arthur Seligman appointed Keleher to the State Board of Finance where he served until 1949. Later, he served as Conservator of the First National Bank of Albuquerque when that bank failed in 1933. He was appointed by Governor Hockenhull to investigate the labor trouble in the coal fields near McKinley County in 1933. The committee produced the Mechem-Keleher report on the "Gallup Coal Strike." The Federal government was eventually forced to step in and settle the strike. Other important appointments included Keleher's service on the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now known as New Mexico State University) Board of Regents, the Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents, and the Old Lincoln County Memorial Commission. William A. Keleher held several important private sector positions as well serving as legal counsel for the Public Service Company of New Mexico and director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States. Possibly William A. Keleher's most important extra-legal activities were his writings. For most of Keleher's life he was an avid scholar of New Mexico history. However, it was not until the Texas Bar Association and the New Mexico Bar Association Meeting at Amarillo, Texas on July 5, 1929 that he became an authoritative author on the subject. At that conference he presented a talk on the Maxwell Land Grant which grew into his first book, the Maxwell Land Grant. After publishing that work, Keleher went on to write, The Fabulous Frontier (1945), Turmoil in New Mexico, 1846-1868 (1952), Violence in Lincoln County, 1869-1881 (1957), and Memoirs, 1892-1969 (1969). Despite the demands of writing these books, Keleher kept his regular hours at his law firm. For his accomplishments, Keleher was honored by and invited to join many groups. Those groups included; Phi Beta Kappa, Zeta Chapter of the Sigma Chi fraternity, Tucker Chapter of Phi Delta Phi (legal fraternity), Albuquerque Country Club, Elks, and the Immaculate Conception Church. Eventually, Keleher was also honored by several institutions of higher learning. He received an honorary Master of Arts in 1946 and an honorary LL.D in 1968 both from the University of New Mexico. Also, in 1968 he received an honorary LL.D. from the College of St. Joseph (also known as the University of Albuquerque). In 1964, William A. Keleher joined an elite group as a member of the New Mexico Hall of Fame. William A. Keleher's personal life kept him equally busy. He was married twice. His first wife, Mae J. Kelly, passed away in 1923. They had one daughter, Mary Ann. In 1932, he married Loretta Barrett of Forest City, Iowa. They had four sons: William Barrett, Michael Lawrence, John Gorry and Thomas Franklin. Loretta was a graduate of the University of Iowa. She came to the University of New Mexico (UNM) in 1925 taking a summer teaching position in physical education. While at UNM she added horseback riding, volleyball, golf, track and riflery to the physical education requirements for sophomore and freshmen women. Outside of UNM, Loretta Keleher was also involved with the Immaculate Conception Church where she served as president of the Ladies' Altar Society. William A. Keleher passed away on December 18th, 1972. Loretta Keleher died on July 31st, 2000.

From the description of William A. Keleher papers 1714-1999 (bulk 1915-1972) (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 70662326

Epithet: of Cork

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000509.0x000284

William Aloysius Keleher was born November 7, 1886 in Lawrence, Kansas to David Keleher and Mary Ann (Gorry) Keleher. Three years later, the family moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico where William enrolled at St. Mary's Parochial School. He studied there until 1900 when he began work as a messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company. Although he started as a counter clerk, he quickly moved up to telegraph operator. For several years following, William tried his hand at different careers working for a short time for the Bluewater Development Company and later for the local Board of Education. The writing skills he exhibited while in that position attracted the attention of local newspapermen and, in 1908 he began work as a newspaper reporter. Overtime, he wrote for and later acted as city editor for both the Albuquerque Journal and Albuquerque Evening Herald. While working as a reporter he met many well known New Mexicans including Elfego Baca. Also during this time, he became interested in law while observing the events at the Bernalillo County Courthouse. By 1913, he was a law student at Washington and Lee Law School in Virginia. After only two years in Law School, he received his Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1915 and was admitted to the New Mexico bar in August of that same year. Shortly after returning to Albuquerque, Keleher found work as City Attorney. Following his tenure in this position, he joined a legal practice with George S. Downer which operated until 1930. In 1931, Keleher founded another practice with A. Howell McLeod. That successful firm still exists today.

Outside of his law practice, William A. Keleher was also an active citizen of New Mexico. He served as chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee of New Mexico for several years beginning in 1928. In 1932, Governor Arthur Seligman appointed Keleher to the State Board of Finance where he served until 1949. Later, he served as Conservator of the First National Bank of Albuquerque when that bank failed in 1933. He was appointed by Governor Hockenhull to investigate the labor trouble in the coal fields near McKinley County in 1933. The committee produced the Mechem-Keleher report on the "Gallup Coal Strike." The Federal government was eventually forced to step in and settle the strike. Other important appointments included Keleher's service on the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now known as New Mexico State University) Board of Regents, the Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents, and the Old Lincoln County Memorial Commission. William A. Keleher held several important private sector positions as well serving as legal counsel for the Public Service Company of New Mexico and director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.William A. Keleher held several important private sector positions as well serving as legal counsel for the Public Service Company of New Mexico and director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.Possibly William A. Keleher's most important extra-legal activities were his writings. For most of Keleher's life he was an avid scholar of New Mexico history. However, it was not until the Texas Bar Association and the New Mexico Bar Association Meeting at Amarillo, Texas on July 5, 1929 that he became an authoritative author on the subject. At that conference he presented a talk on the Maxwell Land Grant which grew into his first book the Maxwell Land Grant. publishing that work, Keleher went on to write, The Fabulous Frontier (1945), Turmoil in New Mexico, 1846-1868 (1952), Violence in Lincoln County, 1869-1881 (1957), and Memoirs, 1892-1969 (1969). Despite the demands of writing these books, Keleher kept his regular hours at his law firm.

For his accomplishments, Keleher was honored by and invited to join many groups. Those groups included; Phi Beta Kappa, Zeta Chapter of the Sigma Chi fraternity, Tucker Chapter of Phi Delta Phi (legal fraternity), Albuquerque Country Club, Elks, and the Immaculate Conception Church. Eventually, Keleher was also honored by several institutions of higher learning. He received an honorary Master of Arts in 1946 and an honorary LL.D in 1968 both from the University of New Mexico. Also, in 1968 he received an honorary LL.D. from the College of St. Joseph (also known as the University of Albuquerque). In 1964, William A. Keleher joined an elite group as a member of the New Mexico Hall of Fame.William A. Keleher's personal life kept him equally busy. He was married twice. His first wife, Mae J. Kelly, passed away in 1923. They had one daughter, Mary Ann. In 1932, he married Loretta Barrett of Forest City, Iowa. They had four sons: William Barrett, Michael Lawrence, John Gorry and Thomas Franklin. Loretta was a graduate of the University of Iowa. She came to the University of New Mexico (UNM) in 1925 taking a summer teaching position in physical education. While at UNM she added horseback riding, volleyball, golf, track and riflery to the physical education requirements for sophomore and freshmen women. Outside of UNM, Loretta Keleher was also involved with the Immaculate Conception Church where she served as president of the Ladies' Altar Society. William A. Keleher passed away on December 18th, 1972. Loretta Keleher died on July 31st, 2000.

From the description of William A. Keleher Pictorial Collection, 1840-1970 (bulk 1880-1950) [picture] (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 246637378

William A. Keleher. Part of the William A. Keleher Papers, MSS 742 BC.

William Aloysius Keleher was born November 7, 1886 in Lawrence, Kansas to David Keleher and Mary Ann (Gorry) Keleher. Three years later, the family moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico where William enrolled at St. Mary's Parochial School. He studied there until 1900 when he began work as a messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company. Although he started as a counter clerk, he quickly moved up to telegraph operator. For several years following, William tried his hand at different careers working for a short time for the Bluewater Development Company and later for the local Board of Education. The writing skills he exhibited while in that position attracted the attention of local newspapermen and, in 1908 he began work as a newspaper reporter. Overtime, he wrote for and later acted as city editor for both the Albuquerque Journal and Albuquerque Evening Herald . While working as a reporter he met many well known New Mexicans including Elfego Baca. Also during this time, he became interested in law while observing the events at the Bernalillo County Courthouse. By 1913, he was a law student at Washington and Lee Law School in Virginia. After only two years in Law School, he received his Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1915 and was admitted to the New Mexico bar in August of that same year.

Shortly after returning to Albuquerque, Keleher found work as City Attorney. Following his tenure in this position, he joined a legal practice with George S. Downer which operated until 1930. In 1931, Keleher founded another practice with A. Howell McLeod. That successful firm still exists today.

Outside of his law practice, William A. Keleher was also an active citizen of New Mexico. He served as chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee of New Mexico for several years beginning in 1928. In 1932, Governor Arthur Seligman appointed Keleher to the State Board of Finance where he served until 1949. Later, he served as Conservator of the First National Bank of Albuquerque when that bank failed in 1933. He was appointed by Governor Hockenhull to investigate the labor trouble in the coal fields near McKinley County in 1933. The committee produced the Mechem-Keleher report on the "Gallup Coal Strike." The Federal government was eventually forced to step in and settle the strike. Other important appointments included Keleher's service on the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now known as New Mexico State University) Board of Regents, the Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents, and the Old Lincoln County Memorial Commission. William A. Keleher held several important private sector positions as well serving as legal counsel for the Public Service Company of New Mexico and director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.

Possibly William A. Keleher's most important extra-legal activities were his writings. For most of Keleher's life he was an avid scholar of New Mexico history. However, it was not until the Texas Bar Association and the New Mexico Bar Association Meeting at Amarillo, Texas on July 5, 1929 that he became an authoritative author on the subject. At that conference he presented a talk on the Maxwell Land Grant which grew into his first book the Maxwell Land Grant . After publishing that work, Keleher went on to write, The Fabulous Frontier (1945), Turmoil in New Mexico, 1846-1868 (1952), Violence in Lincoln County, 1869-1881 (1957), and Memoirs, 1892-1969 (1969). Despite the demands of writing these books, Keleher kept his regular hours at his law firm.

For his accomplishments, Keleher was honored by and invited to join many groups. Those groups included; Phi Beta Kappa, Zeta Chapter of the Sigma Chi fraternity, Tucker Chapter of Phi Delta Phi (legal fraternity), Albuquerque Country Club, Elks, and the Immaculate Conception Church. Eventually, Keleher was also honored by several institutions of higher learning. He received an honorary Master of Arts in 1946 and an honorary LL.D in 1968 both from the University of New Mexico. Also, in 1968 he received an honorary LL.D. from the College of St. Joseph (also known as the University of Albuquerque). In 1964, William A. Keleher joined an elite group as a member of the New Mexico Hall of Fame.

William A. Keleher's personal life kept him equally busy. He was married twice. His first wife, Mae J. Kelly, passed away in 1923. They had one daughter, Mary Ann. In 1932, he married Loretta Barrett of Forest City, Iowa. They had four sons: William Barrett, Michael Lawrence, John Gorry and Thomas Franklin. Loretta was a graduate of the University of Iowa. She came to the University of New Mexico (UNM) in 1925 taking a summer teaching position in physical education. While at UNM she added horseback riding, volleyball, golf, track and riflery to the physical education requirements for sophomore and freshmen women. Outside of UNM, Loretta Keleher was also involved with the Immaculate Conception Church where she served as president of the Ladies' Altar Society.

William A. Keleher passed away on December 18th, 1972. Loretta Keleher died on July 31st, 2000.

Sources: UNM Campus News, 8/21/2000 "In Memoriam Loretta Barrett Keleher." Keleher, W.A. Memoirs, 1892-1969: a New Mexico Item, Santa Fe, Rydal Press, 1969. Reeve, Frank Driver, History of New Mexico, v.3. New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1961. The Historical Society of New Mexico Hall of Fame Essays . Albuquerque, New Mexico, The Society, 1964. Albuquerque Journal, August 4, 2000 "Keleher Expanded Women's Physical Education at UNM" Kropp, Simon F. That All May Learn; New Mexico State University, 1888-1964 . Las Cruces, New Mexico State University, 1972.

From the guide to the William A. Keleher Papers, 1714-1999, 1915-1972, (Center for Southwest Research, University of New Mexico.)

William Aloysius Keleher was born November 7, 1886 in Lawrence, Kansas to David Keleher and Mary Ann (Gorry) Keleher. Three years later, the family moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico where William enrolled at St. Mary's Parochial School. He studied there until 1900 when he began work as a messenger for the Western Union Telegraph Company. Although he started as a counter clerk, he quickly moved up to telegraph operator. For several years following, William tried his hand at different careers working for a short time for the Bluewater Development Company and later for the local Board of Education. The writing skills he exhibited while in that position attracted the attention of local newspapermen and, in 1908 he began work as a newspaper reporter. Overtime, he wrote for and later acted as city editor for both the Albuquerque Journal and Albuquerque Evening Herald. While working as a reporter he met many well known New Mexicans including Elfego Baca. Also during this time, he became interested in law while observing the events at the Bernalillo County Courthouse. By 1913, he was a law student at Washington and Lee Law School in Virginia. After only two years in Law School, he received his Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1915 and was admitted to the New Mexico bar in August of that same year.

Shortly after returning to Albuquerque, Keleher found work as City Attorney. Following his tenure in this position, he joined a legal practice with George S. Downer which operated until 1930. In 1931, Keleher founded another practice with A. Howell McLeod. That successful firm still exists today.

Outside of his law practice, William A. Keleher was also an active citizen of New Mexico. He served as chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee of New Mexico for several years beginning in 1928. In 1932, Governor Arthur Seligman appointed Keleher to the State Board of Finance where he served until 1949. Later, he served as Conservator of the First National Bank of Albuquerque when that bank failed in 1933. He was appointed by Governor Hockenhull to investigate the labor trouble in the coal fields near McKinley County in 1933. The committee produced the Mechem-Keleher report on the "Gallup Coal Strike." The Federal government was eventually forced to step in and settle the strike. Other important appointments included Keleher's service on the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now known as New Mexico State University) Board of Regents, the Museum of New Mexico Board of Regents, and the Old Lincoln County Memorial Commission. William A. Keleher held several important private sector positions as well serving as legal counsel for the Public Service Company of New Mexico and director of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States.

Possibly William A. Keleher's most important extra-legal activities were his writings. For most of Keleher's life he was an avid scholar of New Mexico history. However, it was not until the Texas Bar Association and the New Mexico Bar Association Meeting at Amarillo, Texas on July 5, 1929 that he became an authoritative author on the subject. At that conference he presented a talk on the Maxwell Land Grant which grew into his first book the Maxwell Land Grant. After publishing that work, Keleher went on to write, The Fabulous Frontier (1945), Turmoil in New Mexico, 1846-1868 (1952), Violence in Lincoln County, 1869-1881 (1957), and Memoirs, 1892-1969 (1969). Despite the demands of writing these books, Keleher kept his regular hours at his law firm.

For his accomplishments, Keleher was honored by and invited to join many groups. Those groups included; Phi Beta Kappa, Zeta Chapter of the Sigma Chi fraternity, Tucker Chapter of Phi Delta Phi (legal fraternity), Albuquerque Country Club, Elks, and the Immaculate Conception Church. Eventually, Keleher was also honored by several institutions of higher learning. He received an honorary Master of Arts in 1946 and an honorary LL.D in 1968 both from the University of New Mexico. Also, in 1968 he received an honorary LL.D. from the College of St. Joseph (also known as the University of Albuquerque). In 1964, William A. Keleher joined an elite group as a member of the New Mexico Hall of Fame.

William A. Keleher's personal life kept him equally busy. He was married twice. His first wife, Mae J. Kelly, passed away in 1923. They had one daughter, Mary Ann. In 1932, he married Loretta Barrett of Forest City, Iowa. They had four sons: William Barrett, Michael Lawrence, John Gorry and Thomas Franklin. Loretta was a graduate of the University of Iowa. She came to the University of New Mexico (UNM) in 1925 taking a summer teaching position in physical education. While at UNM she added horseback riding, volleyball, golf, track and riflery to the physical education requirements for sophomore and freshmen women. Outside of UNM, Loretta Keleher was also involved with the Immaculate Conception Church where she served as president of the Ladies' Altar Society.

William A. Keleher passed away on December 18th, 1972. Loretta Keleher died on July 31st, 2000.

Sources: UNM Campus News, 8/21/2000 "In Memoriam Loretta Barrett Keleher." Keleher, W.A. Memoirs, 1892-1969: a New Mexico Item, Santa Fe, Rydal Press, 1969. Reeve, Frank Driver, History of New Mexico, v.3. New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1961. The Historical Society of New Mexico Hall of Fame Essays. Albuquerque, New Mexico, The Society, 1964. Albuquerque Journal, August 4, 2000 "Keleher Expanded Women's Physical Education at UNM" Kropp, Simon F. That All May Learn; New Mexico State University, 1888-1964. Las Cruces, New Mexico State University, 1972.

From the guide to the William A. Keleher Pictorial Collection, 1840-1970, 1880-1950, (University of New Mexico Center for Southwest Research)

Relation Name
associatedWith Armijo family family
associatedWith Armijo Family. family
associatedWith Axtell, Samuel B. (Samuel Beach), 1819-1891. person
associatedWith Baca, Elfego, 1864-1945. person
associatedWith Billy, the Kid person
associatedWith Billy, the Kid. person
associatedWith Clemens, Cyril, 1902- person
associatedWith Cuba Extension Railroad Company corporateBody
associatedWith Cuban Extension Railroad Company. corporateBody
associatedWith Curtis, Asahel, 1874-1941. person
associatedWith Fergusson, Erna, 1888-1964. person
associatedWith Herschel, John F. W. (John Frederick William), Sir, 1792-1871 person
associatedWith Hubbell family family
associatedWith Hubbell family. family
associatedWith Keleher family family
associatedWith Keleher family family
associatedWith Keleher family. family
associatedWith Keleher family. family
associatedWith Keleher, Loretta Barrett, d. 2000 person
associatedWith Keleher, Lorretta Barrett, d. 2000 person
associatedWith Lindsey, W. E. (Washington E.) person
associatedWith Mitchell, Albert K. person
associatedWith Mitchell, Albert K. b. 1894. person
associatedWith New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. Board of Regents. corporateBody
associatedWith New Mexico. State Board of Finance. corporateBody
associatedWith Old Lincoln County Memorial Commission. corporateBody
associatedWith Public Service Company of New Mexico. corporateBody
associatedWith Pyle, Ernie, 1900-1945. person
associatedWith Ross, Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson), 1826-1907. person
associatedWith Seth, J. O. person
associatedWith Seth, J. O. person
associatedWith Sigma Chi Fraternity. Beta Xi Chapter (University of New Mexico) corporateBody
associatedWith Tingley, Clyde. person
associatedWith Wallace, Lew, 1827-1905. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
New Mexico--Albuquerque
Maxwell Land Grant (N.M. and Colo.)
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Baltinglass, Wicklow
New Mexico
New Mexico
New Mexico
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Maxwell Land Grant (N.M. and Colo.)
New Mexico
Lincoln County (N.M.)
Lincoln County (N.M.)
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Subject
Taxation, State
Taxation, State
Tax collection
Tax collection
Water rights
Water rights
Coal Strike, Gallup N.M., 1933
Frontier and pioneer life
Frontier and pioneer life
Historians
Historians
Land grants
Land grants
Lawyers
Lawyers
New Mexico
Railroads
Railroads
Occupation
Activity

Person

Birth 1886

Death 1972

English,

Latin,

French,

Spanish; Castilian

Information

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