Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008

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Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, 1923-, MD, 1946, Harvard Medical School, was awarded the 1976 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for his research proving that slow viruses are a major cause of degenerative neurological disorders. Gajdusek served as head of laboratories for virological and neurological research, and later was head of the Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies at the National Institutes of Health; his research focused on child growth and development in primitive cultures, immunology, and neurological patterning and learning.

From the description of Papers, 1955-2005. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 231042573

Physician, medical researcher and virologist. Daniel Carleton Gajdusek was born in 1923 in Yonkers, New York. Gajdusek graduated in 1943 from the University of Rochester (New York) and obtained an M.D. from Harvard University in 1946. He performed postdoctoral research at Columbia, Caltech and Harvard and went on to work as a research virologist. In 1954 he became a visiting investigator with Frank Burnet at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne where he undertook studies in child development and disease patterns with Australian Aboriginal and New Guinean populations. Gajdusek was named 1976 Nobel Laureate, with virologist Baruch Samuel Blumberg, in recognition of his study of kuru, a fatal brain disease prevalent among the Fore people of New Guinea in the 1950s and 1960s. Gajdusek died in Norway on 12 December, 2008.

From the description of Papers of D. Carleton Gajdusek, 1957-2005 [manuscript]. [1957-2005] (Libraries Australia). WorldCat record id: 423052106

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek was born on September 9, 1923 in Yonkers, New York. In 1943, he graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Rochester with a BS in biophysics. Gajdusek received his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1946 and performed a postdoctoral fellowship (physical chemistry) at the California Institute of Technology in 1948. Drafted by the military in 1951, he served as a research virologist at the Walter Reed Medical Service Graduate School. After spending a brief time at the Institut Pasteur in Teheran (1952-1953), Gajdusek went to Australia where he conducted research on a disease known as Kuru, a neurological disorder that was rampant among the people of the South Fore tribe (Papua New Guinea). Gajdusek's research concluded that the disease, also called the "Laughing Sickness," was transmitted through the practice of cannibalism. For his work with Kuru, Gajdusek received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1976. Gajdusek was named director of laboratories for virological and neurological research for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health in 1958. In 1970, he was named Chief of Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies at NINDS. Gajdusek remained with NIH until he officially retired in 1997.

From the description of D. Carleton Gajdusek correspondence, 1920-1996. (National Library of Medicine). WorldCat record id: 70928990

D. Carleton Gajdusek is a pediatrician and virologist.

From the description of Journals, 1957-1984. (American Philosophical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 122347528

From the guide to the D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton) Gajdusek journals, 1957-1984, 1957-1984, (American Philosophical Society)

A pediatrician and virologist trained at the University of Rochester and Harvard Medical School, Carleton Gajdusek became interested in epidemiological issues in "exotic and isolated populations" early in the 1950s, and while working as a visiting investigator at the Walter and Eliza Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne he had his first introduction to a neurological disorder, kuru, that was endemic among the Neolithic Fore of New Guinea. In an exemplary study, Gajudusek determined that kuru was not hereditary, as previously supposed, but was an infectious disease transmitted through the ritualistic consumption of the brains of deceased relatives. He was recognized for his achievements with the 1976 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

From the guide to the D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton) Gajdusek correspondence, 1934-1988, 1934-1988, (American Philosophical Society)

D. Carleton Gajdusek is a pediatrician and research virologist, and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1978.

From the description of Correspondence, 1934-1988. (American Philosophical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 122632868

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek was born in Yonkers, New York, on September 9, 1923. He graduated from the University of Rochester in 1943 before receiving his M.D. from Harvard University in 1946. Gajdusek began his Nobel-Prize winning research in 1955 after holding research positions at Cal Tech, at the Institut Pasteur in Tehran, the University of Maryland, and at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medicine in Melbourne, Australia. This was the beginning of Gajdusek's decades-long personal and scientific association with the peoples of Papua New Guinea, described in almost daily detail in his journals and in numerous scientific papers and lectures. In Papua New Guinea, Gajudsk co-discovered and provided the first medical description of kuru, a fatal degenerative disorder of the central nervous system unique to the Fore people of the Eastern Highlands Province of that island. Later Gajdusek and others would conclude that the transmission mechanism of kuru originated from the Fore funeral custom of consuming the brains of the deceased. In 1958, Gajdusek became director of the Study for Child Growth and Development and Disease Patterns in Primitive Cultures, and the Laboratory of Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland. In 1970, he also became chief of NIH's Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies. However, his long research career at the National Institutes of Health ended in 1996, when he was charged with child abuse.

From the description of D. Carleton Gajdusek papers, 1926-1997. (University of California, San Diego). WorldCat record id: 36009713

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek was born on September 9, 1923 in Yonkers, New York. In 1943, he graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Rochester with a BS in biophysics. Gajdusek received his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1946 and performed a postdoctoral fellowship (physical chemistry) at the California Institute of Technology in 1948. Drafted by the military in 1951, he served as a research virologist at the Walter Reed Medical Service Graduate School.

After spending a brief time at the Institut Pasteur in Teheran (1952-1953), Gajdusek went to Australia where he conducted research on a disease known as Kuru, a neurological disorder that was rampant among the people of the South Fore tribe (Papua New Guinea). Gajdusek's research concluded that the disease, also called the "Laughing Sickness," was transmitted through the practice of cannibalism. For his work with Kuru, Gajdusek received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1976.

Gajdusek was named director of laboratories for virological and neurological research for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health in 1958. In 1970, he was named Chief of Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies at NINDS. Gajdusek remained with NIH until he officially retired in 1997.

From the guide to the D. Carleton Gajdusek Correspondence, 1920-1996, (History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. D. Carleton Gajdusek correspondence, 1920-1996. National Library of Medicine
referencedIn Jack Dunitz Papers, 1927-2009 Oregon State University SpecialCollections, The Valley Library
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. [D. Carleton Gajdusek reprints]. Indiana University
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. Journals, 1957-1984. American Philosophical Society Library
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. Correspondence, 1934-1988. American Philosophical Society Library
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. [Collection of publications by D. Carleton Gajdusek]. Stanford University Lane Medical Library
creatorOf D. Carleton Gajdusek Correspondence, 1920-1996 History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine
creatorOf D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton) Gajdusek correspondence, 1934-1988, 1934-1988 American Philosophical Society
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. Regaining equanimity : January 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996. New York Public Library System, NYPL
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. D. Carleton Gajdusek papers, 1926-1997. University of California, San Diego, UC San Diego Library; UCSD Library
referencedIn Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Alpha Helix Program Management Office. Walter Schneider 72 Alpha Helix BSIP I, II, III, 1972 [motion picture] University of California, San Diego, UC San Diego Library; UCSD Library
creatorOf Adels, Barry A. Measles in Australasian indigenes. Libraries Australia
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. Papers, 1955-2005. Harvard University, Medical School, Countway Library
creatorOf D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton) Gajdusek journals, 1957-1984, 1957-1984 American Philosophical Society
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-2008. [Anthropological bacteriology : reprints from periodical periodicals and conference reports] / D. Carleton Gajdusek. National Library of New Zealand
referencedIn John Franklin Enders papers, 1916-1988 Yale University. Department of Manuscripts and Archives
referencedIn Martin Rodbell Papers, 1925-1999 History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine
creatorOf Gajdusek, D. Carleton (Daniel Carleton), 1923-. Papers of D. Carleton Gajdusek, 1957-2005 [manuscript]. Libraries Australia
referencedIn Enders, John Franklin, 1897-1985. John Franklin Enders papers, 1916-1988 (inclusive), 1940-1984 (bulk). Yale University Library
referencedIn Gunther, J. T. (John Thomas), 1910-. Australia, kuru and a Nobel prize [manuscript] : a draft of a paper / by Sir John Gunther. Libraries Australia
referencedIn William B. Provine collection of evolutionary biology reprints, 20th century. Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Adels, Barry A. person
associatedWith Alpha Helix (Ship) corporateBody
associatedWith Alpha Helix (Ship) corporateBody
associatedWith Dunitz, Jack D. person
associatedWith Enders, John Franklin, 1897-1985. person
associatedWith Gallo, Robert C. person
associatedWith Gallo, Robert C. person
associatedWith Gunther, J. T. (John Thomas), 1910- person
associatedWith Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978 person
associatedWith National Institutes of Health (U.S.) corporateBody
correspondedWith Provine, William B. person
associatedWith Rodbell, Martin, b. 1925- person
associatedWith Sagan, Carl, 1934-1996. person
associatedWith Salk, Jonas, 1914-1995 person
associatedWith Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Alpha Helix Program Management Office. corporateBody
associatedWith Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
United States
Papua New Guinea
Melanesia
United States
Papua New Guinea
United States
Papua New Guinea
New Guinea
Micronesia
Oceania
Australia
New Guinea
United States
Subject
Virologists--Archives
Fore (Papua New Guinean people)--Diseases
Virologists--Diaries
Medical scientists--Diaries
Nobel Prize winners--Archives
Central nervous system--Diseases--Etiology
Diseases--Causes and theories of causation
Medicine--Research
Kuru--New Guinea
Central nervous system--Diseases
Kuru
Pediatrics--Research
Virus diseases
Medical scientists--Archives
Population genetics--Research
Public health
Epidemiology
Virologists--Biography
Medicine
Bacteriology
Microbiologists--Diaries
Virologists--Correspondence
Nervous system--Diseases
Genetics--Research
Human genetics--Research
Epidemiology--Research--Micronesia
Epidemiology--Research
Epidemiology--Research--Melanesia
Virology--Research
Neurology--Research
Occupation
Medical scientists--United States
Medical researchers
Nobel laureates
Function

Person

Birth 1923-09-09

Death 2008-12-12

Americans

English,

Russian

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