Advertising Council

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Advertising campaigns that supported the war effort were designed by the War Advertising Council and approved by appropriate U.S. government agencies during World War II. Actual advertisements were in turn sponsored by various businesses that would often add their company name to the ads. After the end of World War II, The War Advertising Council continued to produce public service campaigns. The name changed to the Advertising Council, more popularly known as the Ad Council.

From the guide to the Advertising Council Records, 1935-1999 and undated, (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University)

Formed 1942 as Advertising Council; adopted name War Advertising Council from 1943-1945.

From the description of Records, 1942-1986. (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign). WorldCat record id: 28413171

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Press Clippings and Publicity File, 1942-2008, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Washington Office Subject File, 1942-1990, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Promotional Mailings, 1986, 1989-, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Business Press Campaign Material, 1987-1999, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Historical File, 1941-1997, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Posters, 1965-90, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Industry Advisory Committee Correspondence File, 1963-1992, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Bulletins, 1946-2009, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Radio Public Service Announcement Audio Recordings, 1973, 1976, 1979, 1980-, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Speeches, 1987-2002, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: President's Speeches, 1966-2005, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: War Advertising Council File, 1941-45, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Transit & Bus Shelter Ad Bulletins & Transit Ads, 1944-2004, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Outdoor Advertising Bulletins and Ads, 1948-, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Artifacts, 1964, 1979-2004, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Washington Conference File, 1944-2002, 2007, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Annual Reports, 1943-2008, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Industry Advisory Committee File, 1950-69, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaigns Review Committee File, 1948-69, 1981-97, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Files, 1966-2004, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Administrative Subject File, 1942-2006, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: AAAA-Ad Council Campaigns File, 1955-1991, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Washington Campaign Material, 1942-51, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Finance Committee File, 1987-98, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Public Policy Committee File, 1954-87, 1992, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Media Monitoring Broadcast Clips, 2002-08, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Press Releases, 1986-2007, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Video Recordings, 1961, 1965, 1972, 1982-, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Television Public Service Announcements, 1963, 1971-92, 1997, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: 50th Anniversary File, 1943-93, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Campaign Listings, 1942-92, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Special Committees File, 1989-99, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Meeting Minutes, 1942-98, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Magazine Campaign Issuances, 1987-, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Photographs, 1955-2007, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Newspaper Advertisements, 1961-68, 1987-2012, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Special Publications, 1952-2006, (University of Illinois Archives)

The Advertising Council was formed in 1941 to use advertising to promote the public good. The advent of World War II accelerated the Council's growth, due to the increased need for public service messages to benefit the war effort. Beginning in 1942, the Council, then known as the "War Advertising Council," worked in conjunction with the Office of War Information. 1 Its aim was to create campaigns and disseminate information inducing people to take "actions necessary to the speedy winning of the war." 2 Volunteerism was the main impetus for creating these campaigns. The Council appointed a volunteer campaign manager and a staff manager to oversee operations. These coordinators selected a task force from a list of volunteer agencies to work in concert with OWI and the government bureaus needing assistance. The completed campaigns went to advertisers, via sponsorship committees, who donated space and airtime for public service messages. 3 Campaigns during the 1942-45 period focused on working women, conservation projects, war bond sales, the Red Cross, forest fire prevention, victory in Japan, and anticipated peacetime problems. 4

In the 1945-46 period, the Council shifted to post-war projects, believing that its work would be just as essential during the rebuilding process as it was during the war. Its name changed from the "War Advertising Council" to "The Advertising Council." The name change was followed by the Council's consideration of requests from private organizations not connected with the government. In 1945, the Public Advisory Committee was formed. 5 Comprised of private citizens from sectors having an interest in public issues, the committee reviewed requests for Council assistance. Acceptable requests had to be in the public interest, potentially successful via using advertising methods, timely, non-commercial, non-partisan, non-sectarian, and not designed to influence legislation. 6 Requests required a three-fourths vote of the committee for approval. 7 In 1947, the "Public Advisory Committee" became the "Public Policy Committee," though its function remained the same. During that year, the Industries Advisory Committee was formed. Composed of business leaders, the committee advised the Council about projects under consideration that involved business, suggested new projects, advised the board of directors of Council operations, assisted with Council fund-raising, and developed greater public understanding of democratic government and the American Free Enterprise system. 8 In 1948, the Council's messages started to be aired on television. Since then, with growing support from the business community, the Council's messages have focused on helping to solve national problems. Recent campaigns have centered on drunk driving, drug abuse, racism and child abuse.

1. The Second Year of the War Advertising Council, March 1, 1943 to March 1, 1944, page 2.

2. Ibid.

3. Ibid., page 4.

4. Ibid., pp. 5-7; Third Year...March 1, 1944 to March 1, 1945, pages 4-7.

5. The Fourth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1945 to March 1946, page 7.

6. Annual Report 1966-67, pages 3-4.

7. The Fourth Year, page 7.

8. The Sixth Year of the Advertising Council, March 1947 to March 1948, page 9.

From the guide to the Ad Council: Administrative Media File, 1991-2007, 1997-2001, (University of Illinois Archives)

Archival Resources
Role Title Holding Repository
creatorOf Ad Council: President's Speeches, 1966-2005 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn John Paver Papers, bulk, 1920-1979, 1938-1971 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Video Recordings, 1961, 1965, 1972, 1982- University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Posters, 1965-90 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Historical File, 1941-1997 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaigns Review Committee File, 1948-69, 1981-97 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: 50th Anniversary File, 1943-93 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Special Publications, 1952-2006 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Press Clippings and Publicity File, 1942-2008 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Annual Reports, 1943-2008 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. Radio and Television Dept. Maury Holland papers, 1948-1959 and n.d. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Advertising Council Records, 1935-1999 and undated David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. Domestic Advertisements Collection, 1875-2001 and undated, bulk 1920s-1990s David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Industry Advisory Committee File, 1950-69 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Elmo Roper Papers., 1909-1972 Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Center.
creatorOf Ad Council: Television Public Service Announcements, 1963, 1971-92, 1997 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Bulletins, 1946-2009 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Magazine Campaign Issuances, 1987- University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Papers of Susan Schechter, (inclusive), (bulk), 1961-2005, 1986-2004 Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America‏
creatorOf Ad Council: Finance Committee File, 1987-98 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. Information Center Records, 1890s-1987 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Meeting Minutes, 1942-98 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Brophy, Thomas D'Arcy, 1893-1967. Papers, 1921-1967. Wisconsin Historical Society, Newspaper Project
creatorOf Ad Council: Public Policy Committee File, 1954-87, 1992 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: AAAA-Ad Council Campaigns File, 1955-1991 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Media Monitoring Broadcast Clips, 2002-08 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Outdoor Advertising Bulletins and Ads, 1948- University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Washington Office Subject File, 1942-1990 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Administrative Media File, 1991-2007, 1997-2001 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Speeches, 1987-2002 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Business Press Campaign Material, 1987-1999 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Artifacts, 1964, 1979-2004 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn United Negro College Fund. Divisions and departments: Communications, 1938-1983, 1948-1980 (bulk) Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Transit & Bus Shelter Ad Bulletins & Transit Ads, 1944-2004 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Newspaper Advertisements, 1961-68, 1987-2012 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Radio Public Service Announcement Audio Recordings, 1973, 1976, 1979, 1980- University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. Edward G. Wilson Papers, 1906-1991, bulk 1946-1971 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Administrative Subject File, 1942-2006 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Press Releases, 1986-2007 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: War Advertising Council File, 1941-45 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Photographs, 1955-2007 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company. Advertising Dept. General files, 1807-1971 (bulk 1917-1965). Hagley Museum & Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Washington Campaign Material, 1942-51 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Advertising Council. Records, 1942-1986. University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
referencedIn Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Outdoor Advertising Association of America Archives: Operations and Activities category, 1885-2001 and undated. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Washington Conference File, 1944-2002, 2007 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles Archives, 1929-1995 and undated David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Special Committees File, 1989-99 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Clark Papers, 1910-1970 Amherst College Archives and Special Collections
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Listings, 1942-92 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. Albert B. Stridsberg Papers, and undated, 1955-2001 David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
referencedIn J. Walter Thompson Company. World War II Advertising Collection, 1940-1948 and undated. Duke University Libraries, Duke University Library; Perkins Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Industry Advisory Committee Correspondence File, 1963-1992 University of Illinois Archives
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Files, 1966-2004 University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives, 1885-1990s David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
creatorOf Ad Council: Campaign Promotional Mailings, 1986, 1989- University of Illinois Archives
referencedIn Clark, Evans. Clark papers, 1910-1970. Amherst College. Library
referencedIn Pew Charitable Trusts. Grant products reports, 1988-2002. Hagley Museum & Library
Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Ad Council corporateBody
associatedWith Alliance to Save Energy corporateBody
associatedWith American Cancer Society corporateBody
associatedWith American Legion corporateBody
associatedWith Armed Forces corporateBody
associatedWith Boy Scouts of America corporateBody
associatedWith Brophy, Thomas D'Arcy, 1893-1967. person
associatedWith CARE corporateBody
associatedWith Clark, Evans person
associatedWith Clark, Evans. person
associatedWith D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles corporateBody
associatedWith Edward Petry and Company corporateBody
associatedWith E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company. Advertising Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Eisenhower person
associatedWith J. Walter Thompson Company. corporateBody
associatedWith J. Walter Thompson Company. Radio and Television Dept. corporateBody
associatedWith Outdoor Advertising Association of America. corporateBody
associatedWith Paver, John person
associatedWith Peace Corps corporateBody
associatedWith Pew Charitable Trusts. corporateBody
correspondedWith Roper, Elmo, 1900-1971 person
associatedWith Susan Schechter person
associatedWith United Negro College Fund. corporateBody
associatedWith United Service Organizations (USO) corporateBody
associatedWith United States Army corporateBody
associatedWith United Way corporateBody
associatedWith War Advertising Council. corporateBody
Place Name Admin Code Country
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Subject
Outdoor Advertising
Advertising Material
Magazines
Business Press
Alcohol abuse
Child abuse
Recruiting
American Association of Advertising Agencies
Radio broadcasting
National Alliance of Businessmen
Health Careers
Religion
Volunteerism
Public service
Public policy
American Red Cross
World War II--Agricultural and Industrial Production and Construction
Sexual ethics
Newspapers
Technical education
Video tapes
Public Service Advertising
Communication
Job creation
Economic System
Crime prevention
Peace Corps
Nutrition
Posters
Economic planning
Inflation
Environmental issues
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA)
Social security
Ethnicity
Conservation
Advertising
Veterans employment
World War, 1939-1945--Propaganda
Veterans
Business Contributions
Advertising--Societies, etc
Advertising--Congresses
Capitalism
Communism
Advertising Council
Propaganda, American--Societies, etc
World War II--Intelligence, Morale and Propaganda
Artifacts
United Negro College Fund
Forest fires
Committees
Washington, D.C
Television broadcasting
Drug abuse
Natural disaster
War Advertising Council
Public health
Fund raising
Marketing
Advertising campaigns
Financial Planning
Higher Education, Financial Aid to
Television advertising
Smokey Bear
Aging
American Economic System
Council for Financial Aid to Education
Occupation
Activity
Collectors

Corporate Body

Active 1942

Active 1986

Information

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