Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte, 1798-1859

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Lamar served as President of Republic of Texas (1838-1841). This journal, in Lamar's own hand, documents his June-October 1835 trip from Columbus, Georgia to Brazoria, Texas. Observations of the climate, political situations, and people encountered during the journey, delving into Lamar's own thoughts on these subjects. Lamar, like other travelers, stopped overnight in private houses and farms, and stayed longer in settled areas such as San Augustine, Nacogdoches, Brazoria, and Velasco.

From the description of Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar journal, 1835. (Rice University). WorldCat record id: 28424756

Mirabeau B. Lamar of Georgia (1798-1859), poet, journalist, and politician, first visited Texas in 1835. He traveled from Columbus, Georgia on June 15, 1835 by stagecoach and steamboat as far as Natchitoches, Louisiana, where he acquired a horse and rode into Texas in July 17, 1835, following the Old San Antonio Road. During his four-month sojourn, Lamar made numerous acquaintances and learned much about Texas’ history, colonization, climate, economy, and more. He was particularly intrigued by the political status of Texas, which was on the verge of separating from Mexico, by war if necessary, and establishing herself as an independent republic.

Lamar decided to join in this struggle for independence; he went home briefly to settle his affairs, and returned to Texas just in time to distinguish himself at the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, rising from the rank of private to commander-in-chief of the army in a period of four weeks. However, the unruly Texas troops refused to accept him and he retired briefly to civilian life.

In September 1836, in the first national election, Texas elected Lamar Vice-President (1836-1838) and then President of the Republic (1838-1841). His major accomplishments include the early recognition by major European powers of Texas as an independent state, and the establishment of a foresighted system of public education. After his one term as President, Lamar retired from public life, except for service as U.S. Minister to Costa Rica and Nicaragua (1857-1858). He died of a heart attack in 1859.

Exerpted from Mirabeau B. Lamar's Texas Journal, by Nancy Boothe. (Rice University M.A. Thesis in History, 1979) and from "LAMAR, MIRABEAU BUONAPARTE." The Handbook of Texas Online. <http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/LL/fla15.html> [Accessed Tue Sep 7 10:33:55 US/Central 2004 ].

From the guide to the Guide to the Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar journal MS 311., 1835, (Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, TX)

First President of the Republic of Texas, poet, and historian Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (1798-1859) was born in Georgia. After attending academies near Milledgeville and Eatonton, Georgia, Lamar owned a general store, worked as a secretary for the governor of Georgia, and published the Columbia Enquirer . In 1829, Lamar became a state senator, but during his reelection campaign in 1830 he resigned due to the death of his wife. He unsuccessfully ran for United States Congress in 1832 and 1834. Following his last loss, Lamar sold his interests in the Enquirer and traveled to Texas. He supported Texas independence immediately and, after helping to build a fort, returned to Georgia to settle his affairs. Upon hearing about the Goliad Massacre and the Siege of the Alamo, he returned to Texas in time to join the Texas Army at Groce’s Point. After fighting in the battle of San Jacinto, Lamar became Secretary of War in David G. Burnet’s cabinet. Briefly in May 1836, Lamar became a major general and commander-in-chief of the army, but soon resigned due to the rank and file troops’ disapproval of his appointment.

By September 1836, Lamar was elected vice president of the Republic of Texas in the first statewide election. After spending most of his term in Georgia, publicizing the new republic, he returned in 1837, founded the Philosophical Society of Texas, and began his campaign for President. Lamar won in a landslide the following year, due to the suicides of his opponents. As president from 1838 until 1841, he opposed annexation, issued large amounts of paper money, took a stern stance on Indians, instigated the ill-fated Texan Santa Fe Expedition, and established on paper a public education system endowed by public lands.

A largely unpopular president, Lamar retired to his plantation at Richmond in 1841 to write poetry and collect historical documents. After the death of his daughter Rebecca Ann in 1843, Lamar traveled through the southern U.S. writing poetry. During the period between 1844 and 1857 Lamar became a U. S. Senator, reversed his opinion on annexation, fought in the Mexican War as a lieutenant, became a Texas legislator, remarried, and was appointed a U. S. minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica. In 1859, Lamar died of a heart attack at his plantation near Richmond, Texas.

Source:

Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/LL/fla15.html (accessed July 22, 2010).

From the guide to the Lamar, Mirabeau B. Papers 1930; 1938; 1942; 1949; 90-371., 1825-1846, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Veteran and Texas political figure during the early days of the Republic of Texas, Mirabeau B. Lamar was born near Louisville, Georgia in 1798 to John and Rebecca Lamar. He spent most of his youth living at Fairfield, Georgia reading, writing verses and painting. Lamar's interest in political affairs began in 1823, when Lamar became secretary to George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia. Lamar resigned from this office shortly after his first wife, Tabitha Jordon, became ill. He moved his wife and daughter Rebecca Ann to Columbus, Georgia where he established the Columbus Enquirer . In 1829, he was elected state senator of Georgia but did not seek reelection due to the death of his wife. Lamar unsuccessfully ran for Congress in 1832 and 1834. He sold the Enquirer in 1835 and followed James W. Fannin to Texas on the premise of collecting historical data.

In Texas, Lamar was a supporter of Texas gaining its independence from Mexico. Affairs in Georgia kept him from entering the army initially, but his decisive actions on April 20, 1836 caused him to be commissioned a Colonel and he led the cavalry the next day at the Battle of San Jacinto. After the battle he was named Secretary of War in David G. Burnet's cabinet. Although he was commissioned to command the Texas army as commander in chief, unruly Texas troops refused to accept his appointment and Lamar retired to civilian life.

In 1836, Lamar was elected Vice President of Texas and in 1838 President of Texas. His presidency faced many obstacles including the recognition of Texas as a separate Republic, continued hostilities with Mexico and with Native Americans, and the accumulation of debt. During his term he passed the act which set aside land for public schools and two universities. It is Lamar's advocacy for education that earned him the nickname Father of Texas Education. In 1841, Lamar retired to his home in Richmond, Texas, and concentrated on collecting historical materials. In 1851, he married Henrietta Maffitt with whom he had one daughter, Loretto Evalina. He was appointed United States minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica in 1857 and published Verse Memorials in September 1857. Shortly after returning from his post, he died of a heart attack at his home in Richmond on December 19, 1859.

From the guide to the Mirabeau B. Lamar papers MC083., 1825-1938, (Bulk: 1840-1861), (Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library, )

First President of the Republic of Texas, poet, and historian Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (1798-1859) was born in Georgia.

After attending academies near Milledgeville and Eatonton, Georgia, Lamar owned a general store, worked as a secretary for the governor of Georgia, and published the Columbia Enquirer. In 1829, Lamar became a state senator, but during his reelection campaign in 1830 he resigned due to the death of his wife. He unsuccessfully ran for United States Congress in 1832 and 1834. Following his last loss, Lamar sold his interests in the Enquirer and traveled to Texas. He supported Texas independence immediately and, after helping to build a fort, returned to Georgia to settle his affairs. Upon hearing about the Goliad Massacre and the Siege of the Alamo, he returned to Texas in time to join the Texas Army at Groce's Point. After fighting in the battle of San Jacinto, Lamar became Secretary of War in David G. Burnet's cabinet. Briefly in May 1836, Lamar became a major general and commander-in-chief of the army, but soon resigned due to the rank and file troops' disapproval of his appointment.

By September 1836, Lamar was elected vice president of the Republic of Texas in the first statewide election. After spending most of his term in Georgia, publicizing the new republic, he returned in 1837, founded the Philosophical Society of Texas, and began his campaign for President. Lamar won in a landslide the following year, due to the suicides of his opponents. As president from 1838 until 1841, he opposed annexation, issued large amounts of paper money, took a stern stance on Indians, instigated the ill-fated Texan Santa Fe Expedition, and established on paper a public education system endowed by public lands.

A largely unpopular president, Lamar retired to his plantation at Richmond in 1841 to write poetry and collect historical documents. After the death of his daughter Rebecca Ann in 1843, Lamar traveled through the southern U.S. writing poetry. During the period between 1844 and 1857 Lamar became a U. S. Senator, reversed his opinion on annexation, fought in the Mexican War as a lieutenant, became a Texas legislator, remarried, and was appointed a U. S. minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica. In 1859, Lamar died of a heart attack at his plantation near Richmond, Texas.

Source:

Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/LL/fla15.html (accessed July 22, 2010).

From the description of Lamar, Mirabeau B., Papers, 1825-1846 (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 742022848

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creatorOf Lamar, Mirabeau B. Lamar, Mirabeau B., Papers, 1825-1846 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn James L. Britton collection MC010. 46636450., 1817-1889, (Bulk: 1829-1855) Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library,
referencedIn Department of State diplomatic correspondence, 1831-1832, 1835-1846, undated Texas State Archives.
referencedIn Britton, James L., II. Britton Collection of Texana, 1818-1846, 1864-1866, 1885 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Rhode, Robert David, 1911-. Rhode, Robert David, Essay, 1936 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Swisher, John Milton Items 1923; 71-132., 1879, 1881 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
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referencedIn Houston Endowment Texana collection MC042. 48149722., 1805-1936, (Bulk: 1839-1848) Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library,
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referencedIn Huling, Thomas Byers, Papers, 1826, 1831-1881, 1901 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Morse, Samuel Finley Breese, 1791-1872. Morse, Samuel F. B. Letters, 1839, 1860. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
creatorOf Bryan, Moses Austin, 1817-1895. Moses Austin Bryan papers, 1814-1930, (bulk 1836-1889). San Jacinto Museum of History
referencedIn Thomas W. Streeter collection of Texas manuscripts, 1787-1864 Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Goodman, H. H. Essay, 1918 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
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referencedIn Smith, Henry Papers 2001-173., 1834-1879 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
creatorOf Texas. Secretary of State. General correspondence of the Department of State, Republic of Texas, 1822-1859, undated, bulk 1835-1846. Texas State Library & Archives Commission
referencedIn Huling, Thomas Byers. Huling, Thomas Byers, Papers, 1826, 1831-1881, 1901 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
creatorOf Texas. Secretary of State. Secretary of State boundary records, 1837-1843. 1858-1860, 1873-1877, 1882, 1885-1887, 1911, undated. Texas State Library & Archives Commission
referencedIn General correspondence of the Department of State, Republic of Texas, 1822-1859, undated, bulk 1835-1846 Texas State Archives.
referencedIn Thomas Jefferson Rusk Papers, 1824-1859 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Philosophical Society of Texas Records 99-042; 2000-030; 2003-074; 2006-260., 1838, 1935-1998 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
creatorOf Texas (Republic). Dept. of State. Department of State diplomatic correspondence, 1831-1832, 1835-1846, undated. Texas State Library & Archives Commission
creatorOf Bollaert, William, 1807-1876. Notes : Cherokees Memos : to publish for an article on the Cherokees, 1843. Newberry Library
referencedIn Clark, James, Family Papers, 1825-1852 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
creatorOf Guide to the Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar journal MS 311., 1835 Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, TX
referencedIn Swisher, John Milton. Swisher, John Milton Items, 1879, 1881 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Morgan, Joseph I. Letter, 1836 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Morgan, Joseph I. Morgan, Joseph I., Letter, 1836 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Samuel F. B. Letters 65-171., 1839, 1860. Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Bolton, Herbert Eugene, 1870-1953. Collection, 1730-1786. Library of Congress
referencedIn Fontaine, Edward, 1814-1884. Fontaine, Edward, narrative, 1857. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Starr, James Harper. Starr, James Harper, Papers, 1796-1905 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Kaufman, David S. (David Spangler), 1813-1851. Kaufman, David Spangler, papers, 1841-1848. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
creatorOf Lamar, Mirabeau B. Papers 1930; 1938; 1942; 1949; 90-371., 1825-1846 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Fontaine, Edward, 1841-1884. Collection, 1841-1942, (bulk 1841-1857). University of Texas at Arlington, Central Library
referencedIn Lamar, Mirabeau B. Lamar, Mirabeau B., Papers, 1825-1846 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Biography -- Lamar, Mirabeau. Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library
creatorOf Texas. General Land Office. [Land grant] : Austin, [Tex.], 1841 April 3. University of North Texas Library, UNT
referencedIn Starr, James Harper, Papers 78-67., 1796-1905 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Jones, Anson, 1798-1858. Jones, Anson, Papers, 1809-1910 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Fontaine, Edward. Biographical sketch of General Mirabeau B. Lamar, third president of the Republic of Texas. San Jacinto Museum of History
referencedIn Houston, Sam, 1793-1863. Hearne, Madge Williams, collection, 1817-1853. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Travis, William Barret, 1809-1836. Houston Endowment Texana collection, 1805-1836, (bulk 1839-1848). San Jacinto Museum of History
referencedIn Payne, John Howard, 1791-1852. Papers, 1804-1916. Campbell University, Wiggins Memorial Library
creatorOf Texas. Dept. of State. Department of State records of legislative and executive bodies prior to the Republic, 1835-1836, undated. Texas State Library & Archives Commission
creatorOf Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte, 1798-1859. Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar journal, 1835. Rice University, Fondren Library
referencedIn Andrew Jackson Sowell Family Papers Col 14817., Circa 1880-circa 1954 Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library at the Alamo, San Antonio, Texas
referencedIn Rusk, Thomas J. (Thomas Jefferson), 1803-1857. Rusk, Thomas Jefferson, papers, 1824-1859. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Philosophical Society of Texas. Philosophical Society of Texas Records, 1838, 1935-1998 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Smith, Henry. Smith, Henry Papers, 1834-1879 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Clark, James, 1799-1838. Clark, James, Family Papers, 1825-1852 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Streeter, Thomas W(Thomas Winthrop), 1883-1965,. Thomas W. Streeter collection of Texas manuscripts, 1787-1864. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Papers concerning José Antonio Navarro and the Texan Santa Fé Expedition, 1841-1843. Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
referencedIn Mirabeau B. Lamar papers MC083., 1825-1938, (Bulk: 1840-1861) Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library,
referencedIn Rhode, Robert David, Essay, 1936 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Moses Austin Bryan papers MC060. 49802680., 1814-1930, (Bulk: 1836-1889) Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library,
referencedIn Lamar, Mirabeau B. Papers 1930; 1938; 1942; 1949; 90-371., 1825-1846 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Britton Collection of Texana 2003-099; 2005-038; 2006-092., 1818-1846, 1864-1866, 1885 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Sam Houston Hearne Collection 21794369., 1820-1929 Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin
referencedIn Ward, Thomas, 1807-1873. Ward, Thomas William, papers, 1825-1885. University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
referencedIn Richard Bachman Collection, about 1820-1983, undated, bulk 1840-1920 Texas State Archives.
referencedIn Eberstadt Collection AR 76-62., 1699-1959 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Thomas William Ward Papers 73-102; 85-022; 86-211; 98-387; 2004-065; 2008-173; 2008-303; 2009-257., 1825-1885 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Jones, Anson, Papers 1930; 1934; 63-009; 65-025; 70-110., 1809-1910 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin .
referencedIn Taylor (Charles Stanfield) Papers, 1832-1864 Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
referencedIn Department of State records of legislative and executive bodies prior to the Republic, 1835-1836, undated Texas State Archives.
referencedIn Goodman, H. H., d. 1937. Goodman, H. H., Essay, 1918 University of Texas Libraries, University of Texas Libraries
creatorOf Texas. Government bond : Austin, [Tex.], 1841 January 1. University of North Texas Library, UNT
creatorOf Mirabeau B. Lamar papers MC083., 1825-1938, (Bulk: 1840-1861) Albert and Ethel Herzstein Library,
creatorOf Tod, John Grant, 1808-1877. John G. Tod papers, 1836-1929, (bulk 1836-1841). San Jacinto Museum of History
Role Title Holding Repository
Direct Relationships
Relation Name
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associatedWith Bollaert, William, 1807-1876. person
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Place Name Admin Code Country
Nacogdoches (Tex.)
San Patricio (Tex.)
San Jacinto Battleground State Historical Park (Tex.)
Southern States
Goliad (Tex.)
Brazoria (Tex.)
New Orleans (La.)
Southern States
Nacogdoches (Tex.)
Brazoria (Tex.)
San Felipe (Tex.)
Natchitoches (La.)
Texas
Texas--History
Nacogdoches (Tex.)
New Orleans (La.)
Mobile (Ala.)
Natchitoches (La.)
Mobile (Ala.)
United States
Texas
Columbus (Ga.)
Columbus (Ga.)
San Antonio (Tex.)
Velasco (Tex.)
Victoria (Tex.)
San Felipe (Tex.)
San Augustine (Tex.)
Velasco (Tex.)
Texas
United States
Nacogdoches (Tex.)
Texas
Subject
San Jacinto, Battle of, Tex., 1836--Veterans
Courts
Mexican War, 1846-1848
Comanche Indians--Texas History - 19th century
Voyages and travels--19th century
Occupation
Function

Person

Birth 1798-08-16

Death 1859-12-19

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