United States. Pueblo Lands Board

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The Pueblo Lands Board was created by the U.S. Congress in 1924 to clarify Pueblo Indian land rights as well as clear land titles within Pueblo land grants.

From the description of Pueblo Lands Board records, 1924-1928. (Santa Fe Public Library). WorldCat record id: 37654496

From the guide to the Pueblo Lands Board Records, 1924-1930., (New Mexico State Records Center and Archives)

The Pueblo Lands Board was established by an Act of Congress on June 7, 1924, to clear claims by non-Indians against Pueblo Indian lands. These claims arose after a federal court ruled that Pueblo Indian lands were not federally protected, and therefore could be sold to non-Indians. The decision was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1913, which ruled that control of Pueblo Indian lands rightfully belonged to the federal government. By that time, however, there were enough non-Indian claims to throw ownership of almost ten percent of Pueblo lands into question. The Pueblo Lands Act of 1924 was a compromise measure that established the Pueblo Lands Board to address land disputes caused by the original court decision allowing Pueblo land sales. The Board's duty was to identify lands to which the Indian title had not been extinguished. It also had the authority to award compensation to the Pueblo Indians for land losses that the government could have prevented. The Board was to report the fair market value of the lands, improvements, and water rights, of non-Indian claimants who had made good faith settlement on Indian lands, but failed to sustain their claim under the provisions of the act. The claimants were awarded compensation for their losses based on the Board's report.

From the description of United States Pueblo Lands Board Report Regarding Pueblo of Laguna, 1931. (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 39267507

The Pueblo Lands Board was established by an Act of Congress on June 7, 1924, to clear claims by non-Indians against Pueblo Indian lands. These claims arose after a federal court ruled in U.S. v. Joseph that Pueblo Indian lands were not federally protected, and therefore could be sold to non-Indians. The decision was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. v. Sandoval, 1913, which ruled that control of Pueblo Indian lands rightfully belonged to the federal government. By that time, however, there were enough non-Indian claims to throw ownership of almost ten percent of Pueblo lands into question. The Pueblo Lands Act of 1924 was a compromise measure that established the Pueblo Lands Board to address land disputes caused by the original court decision allowing Pueblo land sales.

The Pueblo Lands Board consisted of the Secretary of the Interior, the Attorney General (each of whom could act through an assistant in all hearings, investigations, and deliberations in New Mexico), and a third member appointed by the President of the United States. The Board's duty was to identify lands to which the Indian title had not been extinguished. The Board also had the authority to award compensation to the Pueblo Indians for land losses that the government could have prevented. Furthermore, the Board was to report the fair market value of the lands, improvements, and water rights, of non-Indian claimants who had made good faith settlement on Indian lands, but failed to sustain their claim under the provisions of the act. The claimants were awarded compensation for their losses based on the Board's report.

From the guide to the United States Pueblo Lands Board Report Regarding Pueblo of Laguna, 1931, (University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research.)

Role Title Holding Repository
Relation Name
associatedWith Hagerman, Herbert J. 1871-1935. person
associatedWith New Mexico. Governor (1921-1922 : Mechem) corporateBody
associatedWith New Mexico. Governor (1923-1924 : Hinkle) corporateBody
associatedWith Quintana, Carmen. person
associatedWith Renehan, Alois B. person
associatedWith Walker, Roberts person
associatedWith Walker, Roberts. person
Place Name Admin Code Country
Laguna (N.M.)
Laguna (N.M.)
Laguna (N.M.)
Pojoaque Pueblo (N.M.)
Pojoaque Pueblo (N.M.)
Tesuque Pueblo (N.M.)
Pueblo of Laguna (N.M.)
New Mexico
Nambe Pueblo (N.M.)
Nambe Pueblo (N.M.)
Acoma (N.M.)
Cebolleta Grant (N.M.)
Acoma (N.M.)
Arizona
Tesuque Pueblo (N.M.)
Subject
Navajo Indians--Government relations
Acoma Indians--History
Indian land transfers
Cebolleta Grant (N.M.)
Laguna Indians--History
Pueblo Indians--Government relations
Navajo Indians--Land tenure
Pueblo Indians--Land tenure
Indian land transfers--New Mexico
Indian land transfers--Arizona
Occupation
Activity

Corporate Body

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