Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1874-08-10
Death 1964-10-20
US
English

Biographical notes:

Thirty-first president of the U.S. (1929-1933), U.S. Secretary of Commerce (1920s), head of American Food Administration (under Woodrow Wilson), mining engineer, and author.

From the description of Herbert Hoover typed letter signed, 1917 June 16. (Maine Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 233832875

Herbert Hoover was chair of the Finnish Relief Fund.

From the description of TLS, 1940 February 5 : New York, NY to Jacob Stern & Sons / Herbert Hoover. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 51608523

Harry Chandler was an American newspaper publisher (Los Angeles Times) and investor who became owner of the largest real estate empire in the United States. At the time this letter was written he had just retired from the Stanford University Board of Trustees. Harry Chandler's daughter, May, married Roger Gordan in 1915.

From the description of Herbert Hoover typed letter signed to Harry Chandler, 1942 Aug. 27. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754866009

President Hoover, a Quaker, was succeeded by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

From the description of TLS, 1936 January 19 to Mrs. F.M. Gambrill / Herbert Hoover. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 53018334

United States President.

From the description of Typed letter signed : the Waldorf Astoria Towers, New York, to Mrs. John C. Hughes, 1957 Oct. 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270874939

United States Secretary of Commerce.

From the description of Papers, 1926-1928. (Washington State University). WorldCat record id: 29853654

Herbert Clark Hoover was an American statesman, best known as the thirty-first President of the United States, 1929-1933. Born to a Quaker family in Iowa, Hoover was raised in Oregon after being orphaned at nine. A member of the very first class at Stanford University, he turned his geology degree into a fortune as a mining engineer, before turning his attention to philanthropy and later politics, serving as Food Administrator during World War I and then as Secretary of Commerce under Presidents Harding and Coolidge. His progressive ideas and popular acclaim helped him make a successful run for President in 1927; his administration was plagued by the Great Depression, and Hoover's inability to address the financial crisis made him one of the least popular presidents in American history. Ironically, many of his policies were adapted by President Roosevelt for the New Deal. He lived for thirty-one years after his presidency, and remained active in politics and society.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter to Edward Steidle, 1945 Oct. 20. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 227389544

U.S. president and statesman.

From the description of New York Public Library collection, 1917-1964. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70969658

From the description of Herbert Hoover papers, 1914-1964. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70981688

Hoover served as 31st president of the United States from 1929-1933.

From the description of LS, 1928 April 3 : Washington, to Walter Russell, President, Society of Arts and Sciences, New York City. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 14880851

Herbert Hoover, born in West Branch, Iowa, in 1874, made his fortune as a mining engineer and gained international acclaim for his humanitarian efforts during and after World War I before being elected 31st President of the United States (1929-1933).

From the description of Herbert Hoover correspondence with Frederic L. Roberts, 1937-1940. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 762830206

Herbert Hoover was Secretary of Commerce at the time this letter was written.

From the description of TLS, 1926 March 18, Washington, D.C. to Edward B. Walsh / Herbert Hoover. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 37296698

Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964), thirty-first president of the United States, was born in Iowa, and was orphaned as a child. A Quaker known from his childhood as "Bert" to his friends, he began a career as a mining engineer soon after graduating from Stanford University in 1895. Within twenty years he had used his engineering knowledge and business acumen to make a fortune as an independent mining consultant. In 1914 Hoover administered the American Relief Committee, which assisted more than one hundred thousand Americans trapped in Europe at the outbreak of World War I. During the war he was praised for his efficiency as head of the Commission for Relief in Belgium, as U.S. Food Administrator, and as chairman of the Interallied Food Council. After the war he directed the American Relief Administration. All told, Hoover was responsible for distributing more than $5 billion worth of food, clothing, and supplies during and after the war, and he was deservedly acclaimed worldwide as a great humanitarian. From 1918 into the early 1920s Europeans sent him tens of thousands of cards, letters, and drawings to express their gratitude for their "Hoover lunches." In Finland to "hoover" came to mean to act in a kindly and helpful manner. In the United States to "hooverize" came to mean to ration one''s food and supplies, because while he was U.S. Food Administrator in 1917-1918, Hoover importuned the nation to conserve voluntarily resources and comply with meatless and wheatless days. Franklin D. Roosevelt said of Hoover in 1920, "He is certainly a wonder and I wish we could make him President of the United States. There could not be a better one." In 1919 Hoover founded the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace at Stanford University. As Secretary of Commerce in the Harding and Coolidge administrations from 1921 to 1929, Hoover was widely celebrated for his leadership. Known to insiders as "Secretary of Commerce and Under Secretary of Everything Else," Hoover made Commerce one of the most active cabinet departments. Not a doctrinaire conservative like many other Republican cabinet officers of the decade, Hoover championed progressive capitalism, attempting to balance laissez-faire dogma with humanitarian values. Hoover strove to implement his principles of "cooperative capitalism" by forging an alliance between government and business that relied on experts and volunteers to promote efficiency and self-regulation. To accomplish these goals he organized hundreds of national conferences to study business and economic trends, bringing together experts, amassing information, and disseminating new ideas for making business more efficient and profitable. One of Hoover''s crowning achievements was his encouragement of western states to cooperate in building a major dam, later named in his honor, on the Colorado River. He also coordinated relief efforts after the Mississippi River flood of 1927, one of the worst natural disasters of the decade. In 1928 he defeated Democrat Al Smith for the presidency. Inaugurated on March 4, 1929, Hoover had been president only seven months when the stock market crashed. During the first eight months of his presidency Hoover had exhibited his progressive tendencies through conservation policy, prison reform, a conference on child welfare, and the promotion of humanitarian treatment of African Americans. Ironically, at the start of his campaign he had declared that Americans were approaching "the final triumph over poverty," and he praised Americans'' "rugged individualism" as a solution to the nation''s economic problems. When it became clear that the Depression could not be ended without government intervention, Hoover reversed his stand and initiated a series of innovative federal programs in an attempt to counteract the economic downturn. But the economy continued to worsen, and he was handily defeated by Roosevelt in the presidential election of 1932. During Hoover''s 1932 campaign one of his critics, Walter Lippmann, observed: "Mr. Hoover has long since abandoned his old faith in rugged individualism. His platform is a document of indefatigable paternalism. Its spirit is that of the Great White Father providing help for all his people. Every conceivable interest which has votes is offered protection, or subsidies, or access of some kind to the Treasury." After his defeat, Hoover kept silent on public policy for two years. In late 1934 he began his attack on the New Deal with The Challenge to Liberty, a book in which he articulated his ideological views. He remained active in the Republican Party, quietly and unsuccessfully seeking his party''s presidential nomination in 1936 and 1940. As an elder statesman he headed government commissions under Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower.

From the description of Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964 (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration). naId: 10678005

Herbert Hoover, born in West Branch, Iowa, in 1874, made his fortune as a mining engineer and gained international acclaim for his humanitarian efforts during and after World War I before being elected 31st President of the United States (1929-1933). Harriet Taylor Upton, born in Ravenna, Ohio, in 1853, was involved in the women's suffrage movement, was the first woman to serve on the executive committee of the Republican National Committee, ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 1926, and authored several books of history.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter to Harriet Taylor Upton, 1943 November 9. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 762830207

Herbert Hoover, President of the United States, 1929-1933, earned his A.B. in geology at Stanford University in May 1895. He founded the Hoover War Library at Stanford in 1919 and was instrumental in creating the Food Research Institute and the Graduate School of Business at Stanford. He served on the university's Board of Trustees from 1912 to 1961.

From the description of Off the record talks : typescripts, 1938-1940. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122332875

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover off the record talks typescripts, 1938 and 1940, (Department of Special Collections and University Archives)

President of the U.S.

From the description of Miscellaneous papers, 1921-1960. (Filson Historical Society, The). WorldCat record id: 49242924

J. Robert Oppenheimer who had been Executive Director of the Manhattan Project lost his security clearance because of alleged ties to the Communist Party. In 1920, Herbert Hoover was chair of the American Relief Administration; in 1959, he was a private citizen.

From the description of Correspondence, 1920-1959. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 46956556

Hoover, Stanford University Trustee, founded the Hoover War Library at Stanford in 1919.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter to Frank A. Golder, 1924. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 703840624

United States president, 1929-1933.

From the description of Copy of letter: Washington, [D.C.], to Mrs. Charles A. Munroe, Chicago, Ill., 1918 July 19. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 33973580

From the description of Ticket: Springfield, Ill., 1932 Nov. 4. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 33973600

From the description of Letter: to Mary L. Morton, Montclair, N.J., 1934 Feb. 16. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 33973588

U.S. president.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter, 1930 May 3. (Arkansas History Commission). WorldCat record id: 645485578

Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States (1929-1933).

From the description of [Letter] 1946 Nov. 8, 420 Lexington Ave., New York 17, New York [to] Miriam Webb / Herbert Hoover. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 234302208

Engineer, government official, president.

From the description of Reminiscences of Herbert Clark Hoover : oral history, 1950. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 122569697

U. S. President.

From the description of Letter, 1920, June 9, New York, to Dr. W. H. P. Faunce, Brown University. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122529401

U.S. President from 1929-1933.

From the description of Correspondence 1972. (Denver Public Library). WorldCat record id: 50788996

Herbert Hoover was elected to Stanford University's Board of Trustees in 1912.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter to Timothy Hopkins, 1913. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 703840674

Engineer; later 31st United States President. In 1897 he travelled to the Coolgardie Goldfields, WA where he was employed by Berwick Moreing and Co. as a mining engineer. He managed the Sons of Gwalia Mine before returning to the United States in 1899.

From the description of Correspondence. (Libraries Australia). WorldCat record id: 221780663

Herbert Hoover was the thirty-first president of the United States.

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover letters, 1917-1964, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

President of the United States.

From the description of Typed letter signed : Washington, to Miss C.E. Mason, 1923 Oct. 2. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269555852

From the description of Letter signed (while Secretary of Commerce) : Washington, to Alfred C. Lane of Tufts College, 1928 June 18. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269553623

From the description of Message to Congress : typed drafts unsigned (2) : [Washington, D.C.], 1932 May 4. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269553701

From the description of Typed letters signed (2) : [n.p.] and New York, to Edward Wagenknecht, 1838 Apr. 7 and 1940 June 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270868107

President of the United States Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) was born to Jessie and Hulda Minthorn Hoover in West Branch, Iowa. After the death of his parents, Hoover moved to Oregon and later graduated from Stanford University (1895). He married Lou Henry in 1899 and worked as a mining engineer in Australia and China. At the onset of World War I, Hoover managed a food relief effort as chairman of the Commission for Relief in Belgium and was appointed head of the U.S. Food Administration in 1917. Following the war, Hoover served on the Supreme Economic Council and was head of the American Relief Administration, which oversaw the shipment of foodstuffs to Europe.

After serving as the Secretary of Commerce under Presidents Harding and Coolidge, Hoover was elected to the presidency on the Republican ticket in 1929. During the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, Hoover sought a balanced Federal budget and was resistant to increasing Federal welfare programs. After the Great Depression spread throughout the world, he was defeated in 1932. In the 1930s, he was a critic of the New Deal and chaired commissions to increase the efficacy of the executive department in 1947 and 1953.

Source: “Herbert Hoover.” White House Biography. Accessed on May 5, 2011. http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/herberthoover/

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover Newspaper Clipping Collection 2009-333., 1928-1954, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Herbert Clark Hoover was an American statesman, best known as the thirty-first President of the United States, 1929-1933. Born to a Quaker family in Iowa, Hoover was raised in Oregon after being orphaned at nine. A member of the very first class at Stanford University, he turned his geology degree into a fortune as a mining engineer, before turning his attention to philanthropy and later politics, serving as Food Administrator during World War I and then as Secretary of Commerce under Presidents Harding and Coolidge. His progressive ideas and popular acclaim helped him make a successful run for President in 1927; his administration was plagued by the Great Depression, and Hoover's inability to address the financial crisis made him one of the least popular presidents in American history. Ironically, many of his policies were adapted by President Roosevelt for the New Deal. He lived for thirty-one years after his presidency, and remained active in politics and society.

Richard LLoyd Noble, son of Eloise and Lloyd Noble. Memoriam can be found at: http://www.thomasaquinas.edu/news/newsletter/2003/spring/noble.html.

From the description of Herbert Hoover letter to Richard Noble, 1960 July 30. (Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Library). WorldCat record id: 234179354

Biographical/Historical note

Hoover, Stanford University Trustee, founded the Hoover War Library at Stanford in 1919.

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover letter to Frank A. Golder, 1924, (Department of Special Collections and University Archives)

Biographical/Historical Sketch

Herbert Hoover was elected to Stanford University's Board of Trustees in 1912.

From the guide to the Hoover, Herbert, letter to Timothy Hopkins, 1913, (Department of Special Collections and University Archives)

Biographical Note

  • 1874: Born, August 10, West Branch, Iowa
  • 1895: A.B., Geology, Stanford University
  • 1897 - 1914 : International mining engineer
  • 1899: Married Lou Henry (1874-1944)
  • 1912 - 1962 : Trustee, Stanford University
  • 1914: Chairman, American Relief CommitteeReceived first gold medal of the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America
  • 1914 - 1916 : Vice-president, American Institute of Mining Engineers
  • 1914 - 1920 : Chairman, Commission for Relief in Belgium
  • 1917 - 1920 : Administrator, United States Food Administration
  • 1918 - 1919 : Alternating chairman, Inter-Allied Food CouncilDirector-general, Relief for the Allied and Associated PowersMember, President's Committee of Economic Advisers, Paris Peace Conference
  • 1919 - 1923 : Director-general, American Relief Administration
  • 1919: Founder, Hoover War Collection (later called the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace), Stanford University
  • 1919 - 1920 : Vice-chairman, President's Industrial Conference
  • 1921: Member, Advisory Committee, Limitation of Armaments Conference
  • 1921 - 1923 : Director, Russian Famine Relief
  • 1921 - 1928 : Secretary of Commerce of the United StatesChairman, Colorado River Commission
  • 1922: Chairman, President's Conference on Unemployment
  • 1922 - 1925 : Chairman, National Radio Conferences
  • 1922 - 1926 : Chairman, Annual Aviation Conferences
  • 1922 - 1927 : Member, World War Foreign Debt Commission
  • 1923 - 1938 : Chairman, Rio Grande River Commission
  • 1924 - 1928 : Member, Federal Oil Conservation Board
  • 1924 - 1928 : Chairman, Committee on Coordination of Rail and Water FacilitiesChairman, National Conferences on Street and Highway SafetyChairman, St. Lawrence Waterway Commission
  • 1926: Member, Cabinet Committee on Reorganization of Government Departments
  • 1927: Director, Mississippi Flood Relief
  • 1929 - 1933 : President of the United States
  • 1936 - 1964 : Chairman, Boys' Clubs of America
  • 1939 - 1940 : Founder, Finnish Relief Fund
  • 1940 - 1942 : Chairman, Committee on Food for the Small Democracies
  • 1946: Initiator (through General William H. Haskell), CARE
  • 1946 - 1947 : Cofounder, UNICEFCoordinator, food supply for thirty-eight nations in the world famine of 1946-1947
  • 1947: Head, special mission to investigate the economy of Germany and Austria at the request of President Truman
  • 1947 - 1949 : Chairman, Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government
  • 1953 - 1955 : Chairman, Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government
  • 1954: Chairman, mission to Germany at the request of President Eisenhower and Chancellor Adenauer
  • 1956 - 1957 : Honorary chairman, First Aid to Hungary
  • 1958: United States Representative, World's Fair, Brussels
  • 1962: Recipient of gold medal, Stanford University, fifty years as Trustee
  • 1964: Unanimous Resolution of Appreciation, United States Congress (third such resolution during his lifetime)Died, October 20, New York City

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover subject collection, 1895-2006, (Hoover Institution Archives)

Biographical Note

  • 1874: Born, West Branch, Iowa
  • 1895: A.B., Stanford University
  • 1914 - 1920 : Chairman, Commission for Relief in Belgium
  • 1917 - 1920 : Administrator, United States Food Administration
  • 1919 - 1923 : Director, American Relief Administration
  • 1921 - 1928 : United States Secretary of Commerce
  • 1929 - 1933 : President of the United States
  • 1939 - 1940 : Founder, Finnish Relief Fund
  • 1940 - 1942 : Chairman, Committee on Food for the Small Democracies
  • 1946: Chairman, President's Famine Emergency Committee
  • 1947 - 1949 : Chairman, Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government
  • 1953 - 1955 : Chairman, Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government
  • 1964: Died, New York City

From the guide to the Herbert Hoover papers, 1928-1978, (Hoover Institution Archives)

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Subjects:

  • Society of Friends
  • Statesmen--Correspondence
  • Statesmen--20th century--Autographs
  • Research libraries
  • Conservatism in the press
  • Presidents--Correspondence
  • World War, 1939-1945--Diplomatic history
  • Industrial management
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  • Stock market crash, 1929--Press coverage
  • Ex-presidents--Correspondence
  • Mining engineers--Correspondence
  • World War, 1914-1918--War work
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Presidents--Archives--1929-1933
  • Government executives--Interviews
  • Politics and culture--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Food conservation
  • Letters
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  • World War, 1914-1918--Civilian relief
  • Education and state
  • World War, 1914-1918--Food supply
  • World War, 1939-1945--Civilian relief
  • Presidents--Autographs
  • President--Archives
  • Christmas
  • Presidents--Interviews
  • Manuscripts--English
  • Radio--Law and legislation
  • Depressions--1929
  • Elections
  • Universities--20th century
  • Voluntarism
  • presidents
  • International relief

Occupations:

  • Presidents--United States
  • Statesmen--United States
  • Statesmen

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