Rosenthal, Irving, 1930-....

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1930
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Irving Rosenthal edited THE CHICAGO REVIEW in the late 1950s. He succeeded in publishing poetry by Jack Kerouac, prose from Edward Dahlberg, and the first parts of William Burroughs' NAKED LUNCH before the University of Chicago censored his editorial practice. Rosenthal and a colleague then started their own magazine, BIG TABLE, which survived only briefly. Its few issues did, however, connect Rosenthal both to the Dahlberg circle and with the Beats. His move to New York in the late 1950s led to friendships with Allen Ginsberg, Hubert Huncke, and other figures in the Beat movement, which subsequently resulted in his visiting Burroughs and Paul Bowles in Tangier in the early 1960s. On his return to New York, Rosenthal was drawn into the orbit of the experimental film maker, Jack Smith, and appeared in FLAMING CREATURES and NO PRESIDENT. In 1967 he moved to San Francisco with George Harris, founder of the Cockettes, to start the Kaliflower commune, which continues to exist and where he still lives.

From the description of Irving Rosenthal papers, ca. 1950-1996. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754864391

Biography / Administrative History

Irving Rosenthal was born in San Francisco on October 9, 1930. He attended Pomona College and then the University of Chicago, where he did graduate work in human development.

In the late 1950s, Rosenthal became editor of The Chicago Review and succeeded in publishing poetry by Jack Kerouac, prose by Edward Dahlberg, and the first parts of William Burroughs's Naked Lunch before the University of Chicago censored his editorial practice. After resigning from The Chicago Review, he moved to New York and started Big Table magazine with the help of a colleague. Its first issue included the entire contents of the suppressed 1959 winter edition of The Chicago Review . Although Big Table survived only briefly, its few issues strengthened Rosenthal's connection to both the Dahlberg circle and the Beats.

Living in New York, Rosenthal developed particularly close relationships with Allen Ginsberg, Hubert Huncke, and other figures in the Beat movement. He subsequently visited Burroughs and Paul Bowles in Tangier and lived there from 1962 to1964. During this period he also began work on a novel, Sheeper, which was later published by Grove Press in 1967. Returning to New York, Rosenthal was drawn into the orbit of the experimental film maker, Jack Smith, and appeared in Flaming Creatures and No President .

In 1967 Rosenthal moved back to San Francisco with George Harris, founder of the Cockettes, to start the Kaliflower commune, which continues to exist and where he still lives.

From the guide to the Irving Rosenthal papers, ca. 1950-1996, (Stanford University. Libraries. Dept. of Special Collections and University Archives.)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w62v57s5
Ark ID:
w62v57s5
SNAC ID:
4301247

Subjects:

  • American literature--20th century
  • Beat generation

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

not available for this record