Princeton university. Library

Alternative names
Dates:
Active 0017
Americans
English

History notes:

The Princeton University Library, consisting of the main Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library and 13 special libraries in locations around campus, is one of the world's most distinguished research libraries. Since its founding in 1750, the Library's collections have grown to include more than 6.2 million books, 6.3 million microforms, 36,000 linear feet of manuscripts, and impressive holdings of rare books, prints and archives.

The origins of the Princeton University Library can be traced back to a donation from the personal library of Colonial governor Jonathan Belcher in 1750. In the intervening years the continual growth of the library has necessitated its move to a series of new homes. After the 1802 fire in Nassau Hall, what remained of the library was moved to Stanhope Hall. Here it remained until 1860 when it was transferred back to Nassau Hall, moving again in 1873 when the college's first dedicated library building, Chancellor Green Library, was completed. This space was soon outgrown however, and a second library building, Pyne Library, was built in 1877. Finally in 1948, the Harvey S. Firestone Memorial Library was completed, which has been the University Library's main home ever since. The University's first librarian was Frederic Vinton, brought from the Library of Congress in 1873 by President McCosh. His successors have all been involved in national library affairs, and Firestone itself was one of the first modern open-stack research libraries in America.

From the description of Library records, 1810-2005. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 74214591

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, V, 1966-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Labor in Argentina, 1989-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Bolivia, I, 1982-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Arts and Culture in Brazil, 1962-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Industry and Infrastructure in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, VI, 1944-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Urban Issues in Brazil, 1975-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Brazil, 1981-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Peru, IV, 1976-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human Rights in Argentina, III, 1978-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba, IV, 1929-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Alternative Press from Venezuela, I, 1998-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Chile, II, 1967-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba III, 1947-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Brazil, 1940-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, 1955-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Gender Issues in Latin America, 1932-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Gender Issues in Bolivia, II, 1991-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Health and Society in Bolivia, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Argentina, I, 1985-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Agrarian Issues in Peru, III, 1920-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Armed Conflict and Human Rights in Colombia, 1973-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Peru, I, 1993-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian Poetry: Pamphlets I, 1948-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Chile, V, 1989-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics and Elections in Uruguay, I, 1984-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transvestite Issues in Argentina, 1985-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the The Catholic Church in Cuba, 1996-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: The Catholic Church, 1904-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Children & Youth in Venezuela, I, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Mexico I, 1851-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Augusto Pinochet Ugarte Case, 1998-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the HIV/AIDS in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Latin America, 1988-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the The Catholic Church in Cuba, IV, 1988-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian Literature and Criticism: Pamphlets I, 1916-1991, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human and Civil Rights in Bolivia, 1981-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, V: Pamphlets, 1982-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples and Ethnic Minorities in Peru, 1982-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Bolivia, I, 1985-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, III, 1953-2009, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-denominational Christian Organizations in Cuba, II, 1961-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Peru, I, 1931-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Mexico, 1993-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Catholic Church in Cuba, III, 1995-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Ecuador, 1977-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Youth in Chile, II, 1988-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, VII, 1993-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Argentina, II, 1943-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples in Chile, 1970-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay and lesbian issues in Chile, I, 1991-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Perú, 1871-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women and Children in Brazil, II, 1983-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Rural and Agrarian Issues in Brazil, 1971-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Brazil, I, 1899-2002, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Mexico, II, 1926-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Issues in Ecuador, 1983-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Peru, III, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Youth and Children in Peru, 1994-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Non-Christian Religious and Spiritual Organizations in Cuba, 1913-2006, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay and Lesbian Issues in Latin America, 1963-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Chile I, 1968-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Uruguay, II, 1914-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human Rights in Peru, II, 1978-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: Protestant Churches in Cuba, 1926-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Socioeconomic Crisis and Political Participation in Argentina, I, 1995-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Children and Youth in Bolivia, I, 1986-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Brazilian “Literatura de Cordel”, 1970s-1990s, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Agrarian Issues in Bolivia, I, 1989-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Economy, Industry, and Trade in Brazil, I, 1954-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Health in Peru, 1991-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Venezuela, I, 1978-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Chile, II, 1992-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Education in Colombia, I, 1962-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Economic Development and Conditions in Peru, III, 1987-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Indigenous Peoples, Peasants, and Ethnic Minorities in Bolivia, I, 1970-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Argentina, VI, 1989-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Ecuador, 1987-2003, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Chile, IV: Pamphlets, 1985-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Cuban Protestant Serials II, 1979-1999, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Church Materials from Guatemala, II, 1913-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University’s first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d’états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections’ finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Women in Central America, I, 1960-2004, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Labor in Brazil, 1980-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Protestant Churches in Cuba II, 1941-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Mexican Elections 1997, 1990-1997, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Religion in Cuba: Non-Christians and General Publications, 1972-1998, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson(1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized,they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection(Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Brazil, I, 1975-2001, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Fraternal Organizations in Cuba, 1954-2000, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

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Subjects:

  • Children of women prisoners--Argentina
  • Manuscripts, Latin (Medieval and modern
  • Agriculture--Ecuador
  • Child abuse--Venezuela
  • Torture--Chile
  • Conservation of natural resources--Ecuador
  • Elections--Chile
  • Environmental law--Peru
  • Women--Argentina
  • Art and society--Brazil
  • Catholic youth--Mexico
  • Presbyterians--Cuba
  • Demonstrations--Argentina
  • Agriculture--Peru
  • Children--Employment--Bolivia
  • Presidential candidates--Mexico
  • Safe sex in Aids prevention--Latin America
  • Children--Employment--Peru
  • Insurgency--Colombia
  • Women--Health and hygiene--Argentina
  • Women--Employment--Bolivia
  • Sexual education--Venezuela
  • English literature--18th century--Manuscripts
  • Human rights--Chile
  • Bahais--Ecuador
  • Indians of South America--Chile
  • Catholic Church--Cuba
  • Women--Central America
  • Lutherans--Cuba
  • Mineral industries--Environmental aspects--Peru
  • Lesbians--Chile--Public opinion
  • Aids (Disease)--Information services--Latin America
  • Environmental protection--Peru
  • Peasantry--Bolivia--Social conditions
  • Youth--Chile
  • Education, Rural--Chile
  • Forest protection--Chile
  • Nutrition--Bolivia
  • Domestics--Peru
  • Academic library directors
  • Gay rights--Argentina
  • Conservation of natural resources--Bolivia
  • Religious education--Cuba
  • Sustainable development--Peru
  • Proverbs in the Bible
  • Drug abuse--Bolivia
  • Birth control--Argentina
  • Youth--Chile--Economic conditions
  • Family--Latin America
  • Environmental education--Chile
  • Education and state--Bolivia
  • Religious art--Guatemala
  • Environmental policy--Ecuador
  • Family violence--Latin America
  • Indians of South America--Ecuador--Religion
  • Multicultural education--Bolivia
  • Aids (Disease)--Patients--Latin America
  • Bible--Study and teaching--Mexico
  • Guerrillas--Colombia
  • Street children--Peru
  • Political parties--Venezuela
  • Working class--Argentina
  • Working class--Brazil
  • Working poor--Argentina
  • Children--Government policy--Chile
  • Local elections--Chile
  • Protestant churches--Cuba
  • Political candidates--Venezuela
  • Environmental education--Peru
  • Civil war--Colombia
  • Indigenous peoples--Ecuador
  • Women's rights--Argentina
  • Terrorism--Peru
  • Indigenous peoples--Bolivia
  • Agriculture and politics--Brazil
  • Water rights--Bolivia
  • Petroleum industry--Ecuador
  • Child labor--Chile
  • Brazil--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Latin American studies
  • Catholics--Mexico--Biography
  • Fertility, Human--Argentina
  • Cuba--Religion--African influences
  • Bisexuals--Brazil
  • Environmental education--Bolivia
  • Racism--Peru
  • Political candidates--Chile
  • Jehovah's Witnesses--Cuba
  • Rural development--Ecuador
  • Religious life--Cuba
  • Environmental protection--Brazil
  • Disappeared persons--Argentina
  • Indians of South America--Ecuador--Politics and government
  • Church and social problems--Catholic Church--Ecuador
  • Homosexuality--Chile--Public opinion
  • Protestants--Peru
  • Religious education--Peru
  • Performing arts--Brazil
  • Women labor union members--Bolivia
  • Sex instruction--Bolivia
  • Religion and social problems--Mexico
  • Political collectibles--Argentina
  • Children--Brazil--Social conditions
  • Social movements--Bolivia
  • Evangelicalism--Brazil
  • Presidential candidates--Peru
  • Women--Brazil--Political activity
  • AIDS (Disease)--Chile
  • Homophobia--Chile
  • Children--Legal status, laws, etc.--Chile
  • Women--Latin America--Social conditions
  • Children--Health and hygiene--Bolivia
  • Education--Political aspects--Brazil
  • Industries--Social aspects--Brazil
  • Political campaigns--Venezuela
  • Ecology--Ecuador
  • Presidents--Argentina--Election
  • Peasantry--Bolivia
  • Migration, Internal--Peru
  • Social movements--Chile
  • Church and state--Cuba--Catholic Church
  • Gay rights--Chile
  • Child abuse--Chile
  • Children--Venezuela
  • Political paraphernalia--Chile
  • Religion and politics--Cuba
  • Agriculture and politics--Peru
  • Violence--Central America
  • Judaism--Brazil
  • Peru--Economic policy
  • Political participation--Peru
  • Women--Brazil
  • Community health services--Latin America
  • Church newsletters--Cuba
  • Families--Brazil
  • Youth--Brazil
  • Work and family--Brazil
  • Religious biography--Guatemala
  • Women--Argentina--Political activity
  • Education--Social aspects--Brazil
  • Human rights--Ecuador
  • Peasantry--Ecuador--Political activity
  • Aids (Disease)--Latin America
  • Protestantism--Cuba--Periodicals
  • Women--Argentina--Social conditions
  • Religious architecture--Guatemala
  • Church and social problems--Cuba
  • Women--Brazil--Economic conditions
  • Transvestites--Argentina
  • Drug abuse--Peru
  • AIDS (Disease)--Brazil
  • Young adults--Chile
  • Environmental protection--Chile
  • Elections--Uruguay
  • AIDS (Disease)--Mexico
  • Community development--Peru
  • Children's rights--Venezuela
  • Environmental policy--Brazil
  • Sex--Political aspects--Latin America
  • Abortion--Latin America
  • Gay men--Chile--Public opinion
  • Educational change--Bolivia
  • Women's rights--Bolivia
  • Local elections--Venezuela
  • Rural women--Chile
  • Religion and politics--Guatemala
  • Gay men--Peru--Periodicals
  • Methodists--Cuba
  • Academic libraries
  • Environmental protection--Ecuador
  • Environmental policy--Chile
  • Women in politics--Bolivia
  • Political persecution--Argentina
  • Women--Employment--Peru
  • Agriculture and politics--Bolivia
  • Independent churches--Cuba
  • Local elections--Uruguay
  • Political corruption--Peru
  • Popular education--Bolivia
  • Violence--Peru
  • Unemployment--Brazil
  • Student movements--Peru
  • Economic development projects--Peru
  • Women--Employment--Chile
  • Gay men--Uruguay--Periodicals
  • Press, Protestant--Cuba--Periodicals
  • Presidents--Uruguay--Election
  • Mapuche Indians--Education
  • Land conservation--Ecuador
  • Presidents--Peru--Election
  • Women--Crimes against--Central America
  • Lesbians--Costa Rica--Periodicals
  • Religion and state--Mexico
  • Religious literature, Mexican
  • Sustainable agriculture--Brazil
  • Environmental law--Brazil
  • Abandoned children--Bolivia
  • Seventh Day Adventists--Cuba
  • Political campaigns--Chile
  • Elections--Mexico
  • Religious education--Ecuador
  • Brazil--Rural conditions
  • Political parties--Peru
  • Forest management--Bolivia
  • Papal visits--Ecuador
  • Forest management--Chile
  • Children and violence--Brazil
  • Women--Crimes against--Argentina
  • Pentecoastal churches--Cuba
  • Social participation--Bolivia
  • Manuscripts
  • Presidential candidates--Uruguay
  • Lesbians--Mexico--Periodicals
  • Political collectibles--Peru
  • Governors--Mexico--Election
  • Monetary policy--Brazil
  • Peasantry--Bolivia--Economic conditions
  • Minors--Peru
  • Gay men--Latin America
  • Women--Health and hygiene--Bolivia
  • Presidential candidates--Venezuela
  • Evangelistic work--Ecuador
  • Human rights--Brazil
  • Brazil--Social conditions
  • Birth control--Peru
  • Child welfare--Chile
  • Women--Employment--Argentina
  • Child health services--Peru
  • Forced migration--Colombia
  • Children--Bolivia--Social conditions
  • Election monitoring--Peru
  • Protestant churches--Guatemala
  • Recycling (waste, etc.)--Chile
  • Women labor union members--Argentina
  • Folk literature, Brazilian
  • Political campaigns--Argentina
  • Political parties--Mexico
  • Peasantry--Peru
  • Women--Employment--Latin America
  • Education, Rural--Bolivia
  • Chapbooks, Brazilian
  • Poor--Education--Colombia
  • Children’s rights--Chile
  • Agriculture and state--Brazil
  • Family violence--Chile
  • Deforestation--Brazil
  • Prostitution--Peru
  • Church and state--Cuba
  • Religious institutions--Cuba
  • Women's rights--Chile
  • Privatization--Peru
  • Labor laws and legislation--Argentina
  • Poor--Education--Bolivia
  • Political violence--Colombia
  • Social participation--Argentina
  • Human rights--Colombia
  • Education and state--Chile
  • Sustainable agriculture--Ecuador
  • Labor movement--Brazil
  • Political participation--Bolivia
  • Marital violence--Latin America
  • Protestantism--Ecuador
  • Women in the civil service--Argentina
  • Agriculture and state--Bolivia
  • Gay men--Mexico--Periodicals
  • Civil rights--Argentina
  • Gays--Brazil--Societies, etc
  • Youth--Chile--Social conditions
  • Keyboard instrument music--18th century
  • Human rights--Bolivia
  • Evangelicalism--Uruguay
  • Mapuche Indians--Government policy
  • Mines and mineral resources--Bolivia
  • Gay liberation movement--Argentina
  • Women's rights--Peru
  • Women labor union members--Central America
  • Political participation--Argentina
  • Debts, External--Brazil
  • Campaign paraphernalia--Venezuela
  • Environmental protection--Bolivia
  • Civil rights--Peru
  • Children's rights--Peru
  • Rural development--Brazil
  • Women--Health and hygiene--Latin America
  • Communism--Peru
  • Gay rights--Latin America
  • Music--Manuscripts
  • Environmental policy--Peru
  • Local elections--Argentina
  • Political crimes and offenses--Peru
  • Mines and mineral resources--Peru
  • Religious education--Guatemala
  • Women--Crimes against--Latin America
  • Vice--Presidents--Uruguay--Election
  • Political violence--Argentina
  • Gay men--Chile--Societies, etc
  • Indigenous women--Chile
  • Liturgies
  • Political parties--Argentina
  • Judaism--Cuba
  • Women in politics--Argentina
  • Arts--Brazil
  • Indians of South America--Ecuador--Social life and customs
  • Public health--Bolivia
  • Church and social problems--Brazil
  • Social movements--Argentina
  • Civil rights--Latin America
  • Architecture--Brazil
  • Birth control--Bolivia
  • Papal visits--Cuba
  • Peru--Race relations
  • Lesbians--Brazil
  • Political violence--Peru
  • Christian sects--Peru
  • Reconciliation--Religious aspects--Christianity
  • Children--Health and hygiene--Peru
  • Reproductive health--Brazil
  • Violence--Argentina
  • Women--Argentina--Societies, clubs, etc
  • Protest movements--Argentina
  • Campaign paraphernalia--Mexico
  • Forest protection--Bolivia
  • Religious education--Brazil
  • Indians of South America--Bolivia
  • Women--Chile--Political activity
  • Mapuche Indians--Religion
  • Missing children--Argentina
  • Christian education--Cuba
  • Gay men--Latin America--Periodicals
  • Family violence--Bolivia
  • Church architecture--Mexico
  • Women--Societies and clubs--Peru
  • Mineral industries--Bolivia
  • Youth--Peru--Social conditions
  • Youth--Employment--Chile
  • Water supply--Environmental aspects--Brazil
  • Education--Venezuela
  • Indigenous women--Peru
  • Political participation--Ecuador
  • Sexual health--Venezuela
  • Labor unions--Brazil
  • Blacks--Peru
  • Brazilian poetry
  • Urban transportation--Brazil
  • Gays--Brazil--Periodicals
  • Environmental education--Ecuador
  • Water use--Bolivia
  • Indians of South America--Legal status, laws, etc.--Ecuador
  • Women--Legal status, laws, etc.--Argentina
  • Gay men--Brazil
  • Abortion--Argentina
  • Political campaigns--Mexico
  • Civil rights--Bolivia
  • Squatter settlements--Brazil
  • Political parties--Uruguay
  • Aids (Disease)--Government policy--Latin America
  • Children--Chile
  • Women--Chile
  • Children's rights--Bolivia
  • Social work with gays--Argentina
  • Mapuche Indians--Government relations
  • Gay rights--Brazil
  • Christian sects--Cuba
  • Church and society--Uruguay
  • Political prisoners--Argentina
  • Civil society--Colombia
  • Employment--Argentina
  • Urbanization--Brazil
  • Women in politics--Chile
  • Rural development--Peru
  • Women's health--Peru
  • Christian saints--Biography
  • Land reform--Brazil
  • Indians of South America--Ecuador--Agriculture
  • Protestant churches--Brazil
  • Lesbians--Latin America
  • Christian education--Brazil
  • Protestantism--Cuba
  • Lesbians--Argentina
  • Gays--Brazil
  • Popular literature--Brazil
  • Women's rights--Latin America
  • Sects--Peru
  • Rain forest conservation--Brazil
  • Ecology--Chile
  • Women--Legal status, laws, etc.--Latin America
  • Education--Chile--Handbooks, manuals, etc
  • Christian sects--Brazil
  • Child labor--Brazil
  • Lesbians--Uruguay--Periodicals
  • Sex discrimination in employment--Chile
  • Local government--Peru
  • Baptists--Cuba
  • Political persecution--Bolivia
  • Peasantry--Ecuador
  • Syndicalism--Argentina
  • Non-governmental organizations--Latin America
  • Popular culture--Brazil
  • Women--Government policy--Latin America
  • Abandoned children--Peru
  • Pentecostal churches--Cuba
  • Child development--Bolivia
  • HIV positive persons--Latin America
  • Evangelistic work--Catholic Church--Ecuador
  • Indigenous women--Bolivia
  • Family violence--Central America
  • Infrastructure (Economics)--Venezuela
  • Women and religion--Mexico
  • Sex--Political aspects--Brazil
  • Poor children--Bolivia--Social conditions
  • Lesbians--Latin America--Periodicals
  • Political collectibles--Mexico
  • Internally displaced persons--Colombia
  • Vice--Presidents--Venezuela--Election
  • Political campaigns--Uruguay
  • Local elections--Peru
  • Children’s rights--Brazil
  • Sustainable development--Bolivia
  • Gays--Health and hygiene--Latin America
  • Education--Bolivia
  • Environmental education--Brazil
  • Peasantry--Brazil
  • Child labor--Bolivia
  • Catholic Church--Cuba--Periodicals
  • Child welfare--Bolivia
  • Church and state--Peru
  • Sustainable development--Brazil
  • Women--Bolivia--Social conditions
  • Women's rights--Central America
  • Academic librarians
  • Poor--Education--Chile
  • Human rights--Latin America
  • Family violence--Peru
  • Gay men--Brazil--Societies, etc
  • Brazilian literature--History and criticism
  • Peru--Ethnic relations
  • Women in community development--Bolivia
  • Political candidates--Argentina
  • Aymara women--Bolivia
  • Sects--Ecuador
  • Children--Brazil--Economic conditions
  • Refugees--Colombia
  • Education, Higher--Colombia
  • Campaign paraphernalia--Uruguay
  • Christians--Peru
  • Labor supply--Brazil
  • Rural women--Peru
  • Lesbians--Chile--Societies, etc
  • Peasantry--Peru--Societies, etc
  • Protestants--Uruguay
  • Mapuche Indians--Politics and government
  • Education, Bilingual--Bolivia
  • Public health--Latin America
  • Lesbians--Brazil--Societies, etc
  • Child welfare--Peru
  • Peasantry--Peru--Political activity
  • Privatization--Argentina
  • Rural development--Bolivia
  • Pensions--Argentina
  • Women--Health and hygiene--Central America
  • Human rights--Peru
  • Urban poor--Brazil
  • State-sponsored terrorism--Peru
  • Women--Health and hygiene--Chile
  • Wife abuse--Latin America
  • Lesbians--Chile
  • Conservation of natural resources--Chile
  • Church music--Catholic Church--Mexico
  • Religious education--Mexico
  • Political analyses--Peru
  • Nutrition policy--Peru
  • Conservation of natural resources--Peru
  • Sustainable development--Chile
  • Manuscripts--English
  • Gays--Medical care--Argentina
  • Evangelicalism--Mexico
  • Labor unions--Argentina
  • HIV infections--Peru
  • Land reform--Bolivia
  • Mapuche Indians--Civil rights
  • Negotiation--Colombia
  • Religion and state--Peru
  • Labor market--Brazil
  • Reproductive health--Bolivia
  • Political crimes and offenses--Argentina
  • Environmental law--Bolivia
  • Protestant churches--Ecuador
  • Youth--Bolivia--Social conditions
  • Labor movement--Argentina
  • Women--Brazil--Social conditions
  • Poor children--Peru--Social conditions
  • Family violence--Argentina
  • Women--Employment--Central America
  • Episcopalians--Cuba
  • Gay liberation movement--Chile
  • Environmental policy--Bolivia
  • Urban renewal--Brazil
  • Elections--Venezuela
  • Education and state--Colombia
  • Recycling (waste, etc.)--Bolivia
  • Rural women--Bolivia
  • Coca--Peru
  • Christian saints--Peru
  • Ethnic groups--Peru
  • Sustainable development--Ecuador
  • Children--Employment--Chile
  • Youth--Government policy--Chile
  • Women--Peru
  • Youth--Religious life--Peru
  • Women employees--Argentina
  • Afro--Brazilian cults--Brazil
  • Political collectibles--Uruguay
  • Elections--Peru
  • Women--Bolivia--Societies and clubs
  • Gay men--Chile
  • Sustainable agriculture--Bolivia
  • Church and education--Cuba
  • Bahai Faith--Ecuador
  • Free trade--Argentina
  • Industrial policy--Venezuela
  • Human rights--Argentina
  • Youth--Drug use--Chile
  • Gays--Health and hygiene--Argentina
  • Non-governmental organizations--Chile
  • Reproductive health--Peru
  • Land reform--Peru
  • Women--Peru--Social conditions
  • Children--Government policy--Brazil
  • Education and state--Brazil
  • Health education--Peru
  • Indians of Mexico--Religion
  • Citizen's associations--Argentina
  • Colombia--Politics and government--1974-
  • Political parties--Chile
  • Church and society--Cuba
  • Church polity--Peru
  • Evangelicalism--Cuba
  • Fertility, Human--Chile
  • Missing persons--Argentina
  • Education, Higher--Brazil
  • AIDS (Disease)--Bolivia
  • AIDS (Disease)--Peru
  • Indians of South America--Education--Bolivia
  • Mapuche Indians--Land tenure
  • Women’s rights--Brazil
  • Race discrimination--Peru
  • Presidents--Venezuela--Election
  • Gay men--Costa Rica--Periodicals
  • Street children--Bolivia
  • Education--Brazil
  • Poor youth--Peru--Social conditions
  • Freemasonry--Cuba
  • Children--Peru--Social conditions
  • Poor youth--Bolivia--Social conditions.
  • Reproductive health--Chile
  • Medical care--Bolivia
  • Sex discrimination against women--Chile
  • Housing policy--Brazil
  • Freemasonry--Cuba--Periodicals
  • Industries--Venezuela
  • Mineral industries--Peru
  • Social movements--Brazil
  • Motion pictures--Brazil
  • Gays--Argentina
  • Health education--Bolivia
  • Political candidates--Uruguay
  • Gays--Chile--Periodicals
  • Presidential candidates--Argentina
  • Peru--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Non-governmental organizations--Argentina
  • City planning--Brazil
  • Jews--Brazil
  • Libraries and colleges
  • Refugees--Peru
  • Reproductive health--Argentina
  • Liberation theology--Peru
  • Church and social problems--Guatemala
  • Political participation--Colombia
  • Presidential candidates--Chile
  • Community organization--Ecuador
  • Christians--Cuba
  • Indians of South America--Ecuador
  • Women domestics--Bolivia
  • Church renewal--Peru
  • Aids (Disease)--Latin America--Prevention
  • Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia
  • Citizen's associations--Peru
  • Education--Bolivia--Handbooks, manuals, etc
  • Religious newspapers and periodicals--Cuba
  • Transvestites--Brazil
  • Housing--Brazil
  • Abortion--Chile
  • Education--Colombia
  • Women in the civil service--Central America
  • Women--Chile--Social conditions
  • Conservation of natural resources--Brazil
  • Human ecology--Bolivia
  • Urban policy--Brazil
  • Vice--Presidents--Argentina--Election
  • Political prisoners--Peru
  • Lesbians--Peru--Periodicals
  • AIDS (Disease)--Argentina
  • Street children--Brazil
  • Unemployment--Argentina
  • Land tenure--Brazil
  • Campaign paraphernalia--Argentina
  • Rain forest conservation--Brazil--Amazon River Region
  • Indigenous peoples--Peru
  • Evangelistic work--Peru
  • Elections--Argentina
  • Popular education--Brazil
  • Political participation--Mexico
  • Christian education
  • Presidents--Chile--Election
  • Child labor--Peru
  • Religious biography
  • Education--Chile
  • Disappeared persons--Peru
  • Feminism--Latin America
  • Vice--Presidents--Chile--Election
  • Women--Peru--Political activity
  • Religion and politics--Brazil
  • Indians, Treatment of--Chile
  • Petroleum industry and trade Venezuela
  • Protestants--Cuba
  • Political posters--Mexico
  • Women--Central America--Social conditions
  • Gays--Legal status, laws, etc.--Chile
  • Mineral industries--Environmental aspects--Bolivia
  • Low-income housing--Brazil
  • Presidents--Mexico--Election
  • Political campaigns--Peru
  • Training manuals

Occupations:

  • Children--Services for--Chile

Functions:

  • Collectors

Places:

  • Argentina (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Argentina (as recorded)
  • Bolivia (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Bolivia (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Uruguay (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Venezuela (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Venezuela (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Colombia (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Chile (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Chile (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • Argentina (as recorded)
  • Venezuela (as recorded)
  • Chile (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Argentina (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Bahai Faith (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Brazil (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Chile (as recorded)