Hormay, August Ludwig, 1907-1999

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1907-05-10
Death 1999

Biographical notes:

August "Gus" Ludwig Hormay (1907-1999) developed rest-rotation grazing systems for the management of rangelands in the Western United States during more than seventy years of work in natural resource conservation. After completing his academic studies at the University of California, Berkeley, Hormay began working for the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, in 1931. During the next thirty-six years, he worked out of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Berkeley, California, primarily concerned with the management of rangelands in national forests of northeastern California. During this period, he developed a theory of rest-rotation that asserts proper livestock grazing allows the land to "rest" in cycles. This resting of rangeland produces and maintains the highest possible yields of renewable rangeland values. In 1966, Hormay transferred to the Bureau of Land Management in the United States Department of the Interior, where he spearheaded a program educating government officials, land stewards, and livestock-holders in rest-rotation grazing techniques. He retired from government service in 1977, but continued to advise interested parties in rangeland management as a consultant.

From the guide to the August "Gus" Ludwig Hormay Papers, 1900-1999, (Montana State University-Bozeman Library, Merrill G Burlingame Special Collections)

August "Gus" Ludwig Hormay (1907-1999) developed rest-rotation grazing systems for the management of rangelands in the western U.S. during more than seventy years of work in natural resource conservation. After completing his academic studies at the University of California, Berkeley, Hormay began working for the U.S. Forest Service, in 1931. During the next thirty-six years, he worked out of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Berkeley, Calif., primarily concerned with the management of rangelands in national forests of northeastern California. During this period, he developed a theory of rest-rotation that asserts proper livestock grazing allows the land to "rest" in cycles. This resting of rangeland produces and maintains the highest possible yields of renewable rangeland values. In 1966, Hormay transferred to the Bureau of Land Management, where he spearheaded a program educating government officials, land stewards, and livestock-holders in rest-rotation grazing techniques. He retired from government service in 1977, but continued to advise interested parties in rangeland management as a consultant.

From the description of August "Gus" Ludwig Hormay papers, 1900-1999. (Montana State University Bozeman Library). WorldCat record id: 70975930

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Constellation Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66h6xc7
Ark ID:
w66h6xc7
SNAC ID:
29040827

Subjects:

  • Range management--West (U.S.)
  • Experimental rangelands
  • Range management
  • Experimental rangelands--California--Lassen National Forest
  • Forest management--California, Northern
  • Forest management
  • Range management--California, Northern
  • Experimental forests--California--Lassen National Forest
  • Moving Images
  • Forestry and Forestry Products
  • Experimental forests
  • Forest reserves
  • Photographs
  • Rotational grazing
  • Artifacts
  • Purshia tridentata
  • Forest reserves--California, Northern
  • California
  • Rotational grazing--West (U.S.)

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Lassen National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • Plumas National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • California--Lassen National Forest (as recorded)
  • Plumas National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • West (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • California, Northern (as recorded)
  • Lassen National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • Modoc National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • Modoc National Forest (Calif.) (as recorded)