Lamb, Charles, 1775-1834

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1775-02-10
Death 1834-12-27
Britons
Latin, English

Biographical notes:

Author and critic who collaborated with his sister, Mary .

From the description of Papers of Charles Lamb and Mary Lamb, circa 1797. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71015040

Was originally mounted in Lamb's Mrs. Leicester's School.

From the description of Letter to "Dear T" : ALS, [1826?] Sept. 29. (University of California, Berkeley). WorldCat record id: 26560794

English essayist.

From the description of Another version of the same : autograph poem, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270595334

From the description of Autograph letter : [Enfield], to Sarah Stoddart, [1830 June 3]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 662517966

Charles Lamb (1775-1834) was an English author, essayist and critic. He is best known for his "Essays of Elia" and for the children's book Tales from Shakespeare, written with his sister Mary.

From the guide to the Charles Lamb Letter, 1830?, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

English writer.

From the description of Satan in search of a wife : manuscript : New York, 1872 Dec. 10. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858313

Charles Lamb, English essayist. Lamb's first published literary works were verses included in the second edition of Poems (1797) by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, his boyhood friend. He and his sister Mary, with whom he lived throughout most of his life, contributed several works to William Godwin's Juvenile Library, including the perennial favorite Tales from Shakespeare. Lamb is best remembered for the essays he wrote for The London Magazine under the pseudonym "Elia."

From the description of Charles Lamb manuscript material : 8 items, ca. 1800-1829 (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 162505245

English writer, poet and essayist.

From the description of Charles Lamb collection, 1817-1935. (Scottsdale Public Library). WorldCat record id: 30058077

English essayist and humorist. For thirty-three years he worked as a clerk in the Accountant's Office of the East India Company in London.

From the description of ALS : London, to John Rickman, 1819 May 21. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122610909

Charles Lamb was an English poet, essayist, playwright, journalist, and literary critic.

From the guide to the Charles Lamb collection of papers, 1797-1934, 1797-1836, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

From the description of Charles Lamb collection of papers, 1797-1934 bulk (1797-1836). (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122533796

English essayist and humorist.

From the description of ALS : [London?], to Charles Ollier, [1822 Aug.]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122540730

From the description of ALS : London, to Edward Moxon, [1825 Feb. 23]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122586107

From the description of Will and ALsS , [1828]-[1833]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122633836

From the description of Commonplace book, [ca. 1805-1808]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122586144

From the description of ALS : Edmonton, to Louisa Holcroft Badams, 1833 Aug. 20. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122489396

From the description of ALS (initials) : Enfield, to Charles Cowden Clarke, [1828] Feb. 25. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122490335

From the description of ALS (initials) : to Robert Southey, 1814 Oct. 20. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122489395

From the description of ALsS : to Thomas Allsop, [ca. 1819-1831]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 145507001

From the description of ALS : London, to John Howard Payne, Paris, [18]22 Nov. 13. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122442948

From the description of ALS : Margate, to John Taylor, [1821 June 8]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122633832

From the description of ALS : London, to William Hone, [1825 Oct. 18]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 145507002

From the description of AL : Enfield, to Thomas Hood, [1827 Sept. 18]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86139021

From the description of Poems and ALsS, [1799]-1842. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122380660

From the description of ALS : London, to William Hazlitt, 1810 Nov. 28. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86102610

From the description of Collection , 1813-1878. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122610930

From the description of ALS : London, to William Hazlitt, 1806 Jan. 15. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86156198

From the description of ALS : Edmonton, to Thomas Hood, [after 1834 Oct. 20]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122586101

From the description of ALS : Dalston, to Charles Jeremiah Wells, [1822]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525241

From the description of ALS : London, to Robert Lloyd, [1798]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525253

From the description of ALS : Islington, to Charles Ollier, [1826 Jan. 17]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525059

From the description of ALS : Islington, to Thomas Allsop, 1825 Oct. 5. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122684212

From the description of ALS : Islington, to Charles Ollier, [1826 Apr. 10]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122690135

From the description of ALS and notes : Edmonton, to John Fuller Russell, [1834]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122690138

From the description of ALS (initials) : Edmonton, to Thomas Manning, [1834 May 10]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122581008

From the description of ALS : Enfield, to John Wilson, [1833?]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122581002

English author.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : India House, to Benjamin Haydon, 1822 Oct. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270595850

From the description of Autograph letter signed : "Monday," to "M." [Edward Moxon], [The Case, Enfield, 1827 Oct. 1]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270871236

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Mr. Walden's, Church Street, Edmonton, to Mrs. [William] Hazlitt, [1833 May 31]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270871227

Charles Lamb was born in London on February 10, 1775, to John and Elizabeth Field Lamb. In October 1787, he began his education at Christ's Hospital where he met his life-long friend, Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Christ's Hospital was intended to prepare boys for a university education followed by taking orders in the Church of England. However, Lamb's stammer caused him to leave school early and find work first as a secretary to the businessman Joseph Paice, then as a clerk at the East India Company where he would remain for thirty-three years. After Lamb left school, he met Ann Simmons, the inspiration for some of his earliest poetry, which was first published in the 1796 edition of Coleridge's Poems .

In September 1796, tragedy struck the Lamb family when Mary, Lamb's elder sister who had a history of mental instability, killed their mother. She was judged temporarily insane and sent to Hoxton Asylum. To prevent her permanent confinement in a mental institution, Charles made the decision to devote his life to his sister's care. While her illness did necessitate occasional periods of confinement, Mary was able to lead a somewhat normal life under the care of her brother, with whom she lived and even helped to write children's literature.

For a time, Lamb took a break from writing to focus on caring for his sister, but he soon took it up again, and in June 1797 contributed fifteen poems to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Poems, Second Edition . Lamb continued to write poetry throughout his life, but he also began to try his hand at theater, novel writing, children's literature, and journalistic writing. He wrote plays, including John Woodvil, a tragedy in Shakespearean blank verse, but he turned increasingly to prose, the earliest example of which is his novel A Tale of Rosamund Gray (1798).

In 1820, Lamb began writing essays under the pseudonym Elia for London Magazine . These essays, for which Lamb is best known, were published as Elia (1823) and The Last Essays of Elia (1833). In 1823, Charles and Mary moved to Colebrooke Row in Islington where they adopted Emma Isola, whom they had met in Cambridge when she was nine. In the following years, Lamb was able to retire from the East India Company, but despite his new freedom, Lamb wrote less in the last decade of his life. He died on December 27, 1834.

From the guide to the Charles Lamb Collection, 1801-1834, (The University of Texas at Austin, Harry Ransom Center)

Charles Lamb was born to John and Elizabeth (Field) Lamb in London on February 10, 1775. Two of his siblings survived to adulthood, John (1763-1821) and Mary Ann (1764-1847). Charles Lamb studied at Christ's Hospital but left the school at the age of fifteen due to his chronic stammering. He began working as a secretary and later entered the mercantile trade, joining the East India Company as a clerk in the accounting department in 1792. Mental illness ran in the Lamb family, and Charles spent six weeks in an asylum in Hoxton in 1795. In September of 1796, Mary Lamb (who was afflicted with the same disease and spent considerable amounts of time in private asylums during her life) killed her mother in a fit of mania. A jury found her to be insane and she was removed to the Hoxton asylum. Once she was deemed to be recovered, she would only be allowed to return home on the condition that a family member take responsibility for her care. Charles Lamb accepted this responsibility and devoted much of the rest of his life to his sister.

Lamb began his literary career in the late 1790s, contributing several poems to his friend Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Poems, second edition, by S. T. Coleridge, to which are now added poems by Charles Lamb, and Charles Lloyd (1797). During the 1800s, Lamb began writing journalistic pieces, theatre, and children's literature. He authored several children's books with his sister Mary, including Tales from Shakespear (1807) and Mrs Leicester's School (1809). Charles and Mary Lamb also began giving weekly soirées at their home in 1806. Charles Lamb became increasingly well known in the London literary scene in the 1810s and began writing essays for John Scott's London Magazine under the pseudonym Elia (an anagram for a lie ). He retired from the East India Company in 1825 due to declining health and died on December 27, 1834 following a fall at his home.

From the guide to the Charles Lamb Collection, 1817-1935, (Arizona State University Libraries Special Collections)

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Subjects:

  • Poets, English--19th century--Correspondence
  • Authors, English--19th century--Manuscripts
  • Moving, household--Miscellanea
  • Days
  • Authors, English--19th century
  • Poets, English--19th century--Manuscripts
  • Authors, English--19th century--Miscellanea
  • English literature--19th century
  • Authors, English--Archives
  • English wit and humor
  • Manuscripts, English--19th century
  • Greek literature--Translations into English
  • English literature
  • Authors, English
  • Writing--Observations
  • English essays--19th century
  • Literature--British
  • Authors, English--19th century--Biography
  • Poets, English--19th century
  • English language--Diction
  • English poetry--19th century

Occupations:

  • Playwrights
  • Publisher
  • Critic
  • Authors
  • Poets
  • Painter
  • Scribe

Places:

  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)