Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892

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Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892

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Уитмен, Уолт, 1819-1892

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Whitman, Walter, 1819-1892

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Uitmen, Uolt, 1819-1892

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Waltvitmen, 1819-1892

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Ouïtman, Ouōlt , 1819-1892

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Uitman, Uollt, 1819-1892

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Huiteman, 1819-1892

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Vhitmanis, Valters, 1819-1892

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Vālṭviṭman̲, 1819-1892

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Viṭman̲, Vālṭ , 1819-1892

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Viṭman̲, Vālṭ, 1819-1892

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Vitmen, Volt, 1819-1892

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ויטמן, וולט, 1819-1892

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ホイットマン ウォルト 1819-1892

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Ouïtman, Ouōlt, 1819-1892

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Uitmen, Uot, 1819-1892

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Uitman, Uolʹt, 1819-1892

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Witʻŭmŏn, 1819-1892

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װיטמאן, װאלט

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Witumon, 1819-1892

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ويتمن, والت

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Ṿiṭman, Ṿolṭ, 1819-1892

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Vālṭviṭman̲, 1819-1892

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Uitman, Uol't, 1819-1892

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惠特曼, 华尔特, 1819-1892

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Witʻŭmŏn, 1819-1892

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惠特曼, 沃尔特, 1819-1892

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惠特曼, 沃尔特, 1819-1892


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Vālṭ Viṭman̲ 1819-1892

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Vālṭ Viṭman̲ 1819-1892


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Ṿiṭman, Ṿolṭ, 1819-1892

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װיטמאן, װאלט, 1819-1892

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ויטמן, וולט

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Veeitman, 1819-1892

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Vālṭ Viṭman̲, 1819-1892

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1892-03-26

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Biographical History

Walt Whitman (1819-1892), poet and author.

From the description of Walt Whitman collection, 1842-1949. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702172830

Poet, journalist, essayist.

From the description of Letter, 1863 July 27-1863 Sept. 9. (New York University). WorldCat record id: 477038304

American author.

From the description of Letter to Mary E. Van Nostrand, 1890 November 28. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 49377819

American poet.

From the description of Second preface to "As a strong bird" : autograph manuscript : [n.p., n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858316 From the description of Often too in real size and value : autograph draft, [not after 1892]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122617108 From the description of Autograph, [18--]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70975360 From the description of Letter, 1889 Jan. 4. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70975355 From the description of The prairie states [electronic resource], 1880. (Brigham Young University). WorldCat record id: 663131678 From the description of Walt Whitman Collection, 1846-1965. (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC); University of Texas at Austin). WorldCat record id: 122601862 From the description of Letter and manuscripts, ca. 1842-1969. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 122443145 From the description of The prairie states, 1880. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 367388413 From the description of Trent Collection of Whitmaniana, 1841-1947, (bulk 1845-1849, 1854-1857, and 1864-1892). (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 53308695

Written from his home in Camden where he lived from 1873 until 1882.

From the description of Letter, 1881 March 8, 431 Stevens Street, Camden, N.J. to J. Christopher Starr. (University of South Carolina). WorldCat record id: 56523146

American poet; of Camden, N.J.

From the description of Papers, [18--]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70976122

Poet.

From the description of Papers of Walt Whitman, 1862-1960. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71068462 From the description of Notebook of Walt Whitman, undated. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71068254 From the description of Walt Whitman papers, 1837-1957 (bulk 1840-1891). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70982670

Walt Whitman (1819-1892), a noted American poet, essayist, and journalist, was the author of "Leaves of Grass." He had lived in Camden, New Jersey since 1873. By the time he wrote this letter to William Ingram in 1889, Whitman's health was failing. He had suffered a stroke in June of 1888 and died of miliary tuberculosis on March 26, 1892. Ingram was a pallbearer at Whitman's funeral.

From the description of Walt Whitman letter (MS 50), 1889. (Denver Public Library). WorldCat record id: 256488929

Walt Whitman was born on 31 May 1819, at West Hills, Long Island, N.Y. From 1830-1846, Whitman served variously as office boy, printer's devil, schoolteacher, typesetter, and journalist. He published his volume of verse Leaves of Grass in 1855. In January 1873, he suffered a stroke of paralysis from which he never completely recovered. Whitman died in Camden, NJ, on 26 March 1892.

From the guide to the Walt Whitman Papers, 1884-1888, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Rare Book Literary and Historical Papers.)

Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, at West Hills, Long Island, New York. From 1830-1846 Whitman served variously as office boy, printer's devil, schoolteacher, typesetter, and journalist. He published his volume of verse Leaves of Grass in 1855. In January 1873 he suffered a stroke of paralysis from which he never completely recovered. Whitman died in Camden, NJ, on 26 March 1892.

From the description of Walt Whitman papers, 1884-1888. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 14117398

Born May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, Walt Whitman spent his early life working variously as an office boy, school teacher, compositor, reporter, and editor. Growing up in Brooklyn, he received only six years of formal education and took his first job at age 11. He was 21 before his first success as a writer, and between 1843 and 1846 wrote articles for several New York City papers. He become editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1846, but was fired after two years over political differences with the owner.

In 1848 Whitman spent three months working at the New Orleans Daily Crescent, then returned to New York to edit the Brooklyn Daily Freeman for one year. From 1849 to 1855 he lived with his parents in Brooklyn, writing occasional pieces for area papers and working briefly as a carpenter. Throughout this period he read numerous literary and social works and maintained notebooks of his own writings. These formed the basis of his first edition of poetry, Leaves of Grass, published in 1855. It received mixed reviews and limited sales, and Whitman continued his newspaper writing and editing while he reworked and expanded the book.

In 1862 Whitman's brother was wounded at Fredericksburg and Whitman traveled to his aid. Finding him with minor wounds, Whitman settled in Washington, DC, where he tended wounded soldiers and worked for the army paymaster. In 1864 he took a position at the Interior Department, and in 1865 published Drum Taps, a collection of Civil War inspired poems.

Whitman lost his job in 1865, but was soon offered work by the U. S. Attorney General. New editions of Leaves of Grass appeared in 1866, 1867, and 1871. He also published Democratic Vistas and Passage to India in 1871, but his good fortune did not last and in 1873 he suffered a debilitating stroke followed closely by the death of his mother. By 1874 he had lost his job at the Attorney General's office and was living in Camden, New Jersey, again writing for New York area papers.

Whitman published a reprint of Leaves of Grass in 1876 and continued convalescing and receiving guests at his home. An 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass was declared obscene by the Boston District Attorney, but the notoriety caused such demand that the book was reprinted in 1883, 1884, and 1888. Whitman suffered a second stroke in 1888 and his health continued to deteriorate. He died soon after an 1892 printing of Leaves of Grass, which he determined was finally complete.

From the guide to the Walt Whitman Collection TXRC03-A4., 1846-1965, nd, (The University of Texas at Austin, Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center)

American poet Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York, and died of illness on March 26, 1892, in Camden, New Jersey. Whitman is best known for his collection of poetry, Leaves of Grass , which was first published in 1855. Whitman continued to revise and rework his Leaves of Grass for the remainder of his life, ultimately producing nine different editions, each featuring further revisions, new poems, and some deletions of earlier poems. In 1881 Whitman settled on the final arrangement of Leaves of Grass and subsequently made no further revisions to the core text. All new poems written after 1881 were added to Leaves of Grass as annexes to the 1881 edition; the final authorial edition of his poems, the so-called "death-bed" edition, appeared in 1892, shortly before his demise.

"Walt Whitman." Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC (accessed March 2011). Whitman, Walt. Notes and Fragments. Ed. Richard Maurice Bucke. London, Ontario, Canada: Printed for the Editor by A. Talbot & Co., 1899.

From the guide to the Walt Whitman manuscript, circa 1870-1892, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

American poet Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York, and died of illness on March 26, 1892, in Camden, New Jersey. Whitman is best known for his collection of poetry, Leaves of Grass , which was first published in 1855. Whitman continued to revise and rework his Leaves of Grass for the remainder of his life, ultimately producing nine different editions, each featuring further revisions, new poems, and some deletions of earlier poems. In 1881 Whitman settled on the final arrangement of Leaves of Grass and subsequently made no further revisions to the core text. All new poems written after 1881 were added to Leaves of Grass as annexes to the 1881 edition; the final authorial edition of his poems, the so-called "death-bed" edition, appeared in 1892, shortly before his demise.

"Walt Whitman." Encyclopedia of World Biography , 2nd ed. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/BioRC (accessed March 2011).

From the guide to the Walt Whitman letter to Thomas Donaldson, 1889 June 9, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Biographical Note

1819, May 31 Born, West Hills, N.Y. 1830 1846 Held various jobs as office boy, schoolteacher, typesetter, and journalist chiefly in Long Island and Brooklyn, N.Y. 1839 1840 Writer and typesetter, Long Island Democrat 1841 1848 Associated with numerous newspapers and magazines, including the New York Aurora and the New York Evening Tattler 1846 1848 Editor, Brooklyn Eagle 1848 Writer, New Orleans Crescent Editor, Brooklyn Freeman 1855 Published Leaves of Grass (Brooklyn, N.Y.: n.p. 95 pp.). Enlarged and revised in succeeding editions of 1856, 1860-1861, 1867, 1871, 1876, 1881-1882, 1888-1889, and 1891-1892 1857 1859 Editor, Brooklyn Times 1862 1864 Served as hospital nurse, Washington, D.C. 1865 Published Drum Taps (New York: n.p. 72 pp.) Clerk, Department of Interior, Washington, D.C. 1865 1873 Clerk, Office of the Attorney General, Washington, D.C. 1871 Published Democratic Vistas (Washington, D.C.: n.p. [Printed by J. S. Redfield, New York]. 84 pp.) Published Passage to India (Washington, D.C.: n.p. [Printed by J. S. Redfield, New York]. 120 pp.) Published After All, Not to Create Only (Boston: Roberts Brothers. 24 pp.) 1872 Published As a Strong Bird on Pinions Free (Washington, D.C.: n.p. [Printed by S. W. Green, New York]. 14 pp.) 1873 Suffered paralytic stroke 1875 1876 Published Memoranda During the War (Camden, N.J.: n.p. 68 pp.) 1876 Published Two Rivulets (Camden, N.J.: n.p. 32 pp.) 1882 1883 Published Specimen Days and Collect (Philadelphia: David McKay. 376 pp.) 1888 Published November Boughs (Philadelphia: David McKay. 140 pp.) 1891 Published Good-Bye My Fancy (Philadelphia: David McKay. 66 pp.) 1892, Mar. 26 Died, Camden, N.J. From the guide to the Walt Whitman Papers in the Charles E. Feinberg Collection, 1763-1985, (bulk 1841-1981), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Biographical Note

Whitman, Walt

1819, May 31 Born, West Hills, Long Island, N.Y. 1830 1846 Various jobs as office boy, printer's devil, schoolteacher, typesetter, and journalist 1839 1840 Writer and typesetter, Long Island Democrat 1841 1848 Associated with over ten newspapers and magazines, including the Aurora (New York) and the Evening Tattler (New York) 1846 1848 Editor, Brooklyn Eagle 1848 Writer, New Orleans Crescent Editor, Brooklyn Freeman 1855 Published Leaves of Grass (Brooklyn, N.Y.: [Printed by Rome Brothers, Brooklyn, New York]. 95 pp.); enlarged and revised in succeeding editions of 1856, 1860-1861, 1867, 1871, 1876, 1881-1882, 1888-1889, and 1891-1892 1857 1859 Editor, Brooklyn Times 1862 1864 Hospital nurse, Washington, D.C. 1865 Published Drum Taps (New York: [Printed by Peter Eckler, New York]. 72 pp.) Clerk, Interior Department 1865 1873 Clerk, Office of the Attorney General, Justice Department 1871 Published Democratic Vistas (Washington, D.C.: [Printed by J. S. Redfield, New York]. 84 pp.) Published Passage to India (Washington, D.C.: [Printed by J. S. Redfield, New York]. 120 pp.) Published After All, Not to Create Only (Boston: Roberts Brothers. 24 pp.) 1872 Published As a Strong Bird on Pinions Free (Washington, D.C.: [Printed by S. W. Green, New York]. 14 pp.) 1873 Suffered paralytic stroke 1875 1876 Published Memoranda during the War (Camden, N.J.: Author's edition. 68 pp.) 1876 Published Two Rivulets (Camden, N.J.: Author's edition. 32 pp.) 1882 1883 Published Specimen Days and Collect (Philadelphia: David McKay. 376 pp.) 1888 Published November Boughs (Philadelphia: David McKay. 140 pp.) 1891 Published Good-Bye My Fancy (Philadelphia: David McKay. 66 pp.) 1892, Mar. 26 Died, Camden, N.J. From the guide to the Thomas Biggs Harned collection of Walt Whitman papers, 1842-1937, (bulk 1855-1892), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Walt Whitman was born May 31, 1819 on Long Island, one of seven children, and died March 26, 1892 in Camden, New Jersey. His family moved to Brooklyn when he was four years old. When he was thirteen he began work at the liberal Long Island Patriot, the beginning of his long involvement with journalism that included founding and running his own paper. Later in life, he worked as a teacher, a printer, a government clerk, and as a volunteer nurse to sick and wounded Civil War soldiers.

1842 Published a commissioned temperance novel in the November 23 supplement to the New World, entitled Franklin Evans; or the Inebriate . NYPL is one of only four institutions known to have the supplement. 1855 First edition of Leaves of Grass published to mixed reviews. 1855 Father died. Whitman assumed responsibility for his family. 1856 Second edition of Leaves of Grass brought out. 1860 Third edition of Leaves of Grass was published. 1862-1864 Whitman traveled to Fredericksburg, Virginia, in search of his brother George who had been listed among the soldiers wounded there. During the five days of his successful search for his brother, he became so overwhelmed by the suffering he saw that he remained, visiting and caring for sick and wounded soldiers as an unofficial nurse in Washington, D.C. and on the front. Supporting himself with a job at the Army Paymaster's Office, Whitman nursed wounded soldiers after work. In addition to volunteering his time, he collected money to augment his personal contributions for the purchase of fruit, biscuits, tobacco, milk, paper and stamps for the soldiers. Finally in 1865, he was forced to give up nursing because of his own ill health. 1865 Early in the year, Whitman's friend William O'Connor helped him obtain a position at the Office of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior. When, on June 30, 1865, the Secretary of the Interior James Harlan discovered a heavily revised edition of Leaves of Grass in his desk, he fired Whitman. (This copy, known as the "Blue Book" because of the color of its cover, can be found in the Oscar Lion Collection, Manuscripts Division, The New York Public Library.) A former Methodist minister, Harlan found a number of passages indecent and felt they advocated free love. William O'Connor came to Whitman's defense and managed to have him transferred to the Attorney General's office. O'Connor then wrote The Good Gray Poet, a pamphlet that defended Whitman against Harlan's accusations of indecency. He wished to speed Whitman's acceptance by the general public, which in many ways he did. The sobriquet “Good Gray Poet” stuck. 1865Drum-Taps was published in the summer. 1865 In October Drum-Taps was republished as Sequel to Drum-Taps, bound with an additional twenty-four pages which included poems in memory of Abraham Lincoln who had been assassinated on April 14, 1865. 1867 Whitman published Democracy and a fourth edition of Leaves of Grass . 1868 English edition of Leaves of Grass is published, edited by William Rossetti and entitled Poems of Walt Whitman . It received warm reviews, including Algernon Charles Swinburne's praise which likened Whitman to William Blake. Alfred, Lord Tennyson began to correspond with him, and Anne Gilchrist, the widow of the Blake biographer Alexander Gilchrist, proposed marriage. 1871 Fifth edition of Leaves of Grass published. Democratic Vistas and Passage to India, two new works, also published. 1873 Whitman suffered a serious stroke that resulted in lameness and general weakness. Only a few months earlier his mother had died, an experience he described as the "great dark cloud of my life." Unable to work after the stroke, he went to Camden, N.J., to live with his brother and sister-in-law while he recovered (a process which took years), moving into the room in which his mother had died. Magnifying the period's bleakness for him was a dispute with William O'Connor that caused their estrangement. 1875 Now able to move around more easily, he spent long periods visiting nearby friends. 1875 On November 17, Whitman attended the reburial of Edgar Allan Poe and the dedication of a Poe monument in Baltimore. He was the only literary figure to attend. 1876Democratic Vistas was reissued with additional poems under the title Two Rivulets . 1879 Whitman's health improved enough to allow him to lecture and travel more broadly. 1881 Sixth edition of Leaves of Grass published in November in Boston, MA. 1882Leaves of Grass is banned in April. When Whitman refused to make required changes, Osgood & Company halted publication. By June, Whitman had entered into an agreement with another company, Rees Welsh & Company in Philadelphia, and the book was released in 1882. Because of the scandal, the reissue sold well. 1882 Rees Welsh also published Specimen Days and Collect . 1883 Dr. Bucke, a Canadian physician and alienist, as well as a friend of Whitman's, published the first biography of Whitman. (Whitman's in-depth revision of Bucke's Analysis of Poems is now in the Berg Collection.) 1884 Whitman bought his own house at 328 Mickle Street in Camden, N.J. 1886 He began work on November Boughs, another work of prose and poetry, and continued to write short pieces for magazines and newspapers to supplement his income. 1888 Suffered another stroke in June, this one severe. Because of paralysis he now required a male nurse and a wheelchair for mobility. With Horace Traubel's assistance, however, he was able to complete and publish November Boughs as well as the Complete Poetry & Prose of Walt Whitman, 1855-1888 . 1889 A large celebration was given in honor of the poet's seventieth birthday. Whitman worked hard throughout his life to attain the literary attention he felt he deserved. By the end of his life he was respected in both the United States and England and his work had been translated into a number of languages. Visitors to his house at Mickle Street included Oscar Wilde, Edmond Gosse, Horace Howard Furness and Joseph Penell. Financial support in his later years came from a varied group that included Edwin Booth, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mark Twain, Henry James and Robert Louis Stevenson. 1891 Completed and published Good-Bye My Fancy and the final version of Leaves of Grass . 1892 Walt Whitman died on March 26. From the guide to the Walt Whitman papers, 1854-1892, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Walt Whitman (1819-1892), noted American poet, essayist, and journalist, was author of "Leaves of Grass."

Whitman had lived in Camden, New Jersey since 1873. By the writing of this letter to William Ingram in 1889, Whitman's health was failing. He had suffered his most recent stroke in June of 1888 and died of miliary tuberculosis 26 March 1892. Ingram was a pallbearer at Whitman's funeral.

From the guide to the Walt Whitman Letter (MS 50), 1889, (University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.)

Teunis G. Bergen was born in the town of New Utrecht, New York on October 6, 1806, the eldest child of Garret Bergen and his wife Jane (nee Wyckoff). While growing up, he worked on his father's farm in the Gowanus area of Brooklyn and was educated at both the common school of the district and at Erasmus Hall Academy in Flatbush. As a young man, he was trained as a surveyor and subsequently pursued a successful career in this field.

Bergen was also a farmer and an active civic leader. As a member of the 241st regiment of the New York State Militia, he held the ranks of Ensign, Captain, Adjutant, Lieutenant-Colonel, and finally, Colonel. He served on the Kings County Board of Supervisors as the Supervisor of the town of New Utrecht for twenty-three years, 1836-1859, and was Chairman of the Board from 1842 to 1846. Bergen served as a member of the New York State Constitutional Conventions of 1846, 1867, and 1868, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1860. In 1864, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Democrat to the Thirty-ninth Congress, an office which he held until 1867.

In addition to his professional and civic activities, Teunis G. Bergen was a self-trianed historical researcher and genealogist, as well as a published author. His genealogical interests included not only his own family, but also many other prominent Brooklyn families. His published works include The Register of the Early Settlers and Freeholders of Kings County, NY, from its First Settlement by Europeans, to 1700, with Biographical Notices and Family Genealogies ; Genealogy of the Van Brunt Family, 1653-1867 ; The Bergen Family; or, the Descendents of Hans Hansen Bergen, One of the Early Settlers of New York and Brooklyn, L.I., with Notes on the Genealogy of Some of the Branches of the Cowenhoven, Voorhees, Eldert, Stoothoof, Cortelyou, Stryker, Suydam, Lott, Wyckoff, Barkeloo, Lefferts, Martense, Hubbard, Van Brunt, Vanderbilt, Vanderveer, Van Nuyse, and Other Long Island Families ; Genealogy of the Lefferts Family, 1650-1878 ; and his seven volume A History of New Utrecht, Long Island . Additionally, he contributed frequently to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record .

Teunis G. Bergen died of pneumonia at his residence in New Utrecht, Long Island at the age of 74, and was interred at Green-Wood Cemetery.

The Bergen family that settled and proliferated throughout New York and New Jersey beginning in the 17th century is descended from the common ancestor, Hans Hansen Bergen, a native of Bergen, Norway. A ship's carpenter by trade, Bergen moved to Holland as a young man, and subsequently emigrated to the colony of New Amsterdam in 1633. His name appeared in land and church records in different forms, including Hans de Boer, Hans Noorman, Hans Hanszen Van Bergen, Hans Hansen, and Hans Hansen Bergen. It was not until the late 17th or early 18th century that his descendents formally adopted the surname, Bergen.

In 1639, Hans Hansen Bergen married Sara Rapalje, who was mistakenly rumored to have been the first European child born in the colony of New Netherland. They had eight children, among them Michael Hansen Bergen (baptized November 4, 1646), who held civil office for several years and was one of the patentees named in Governor Thomas Dongan's patent of May 13, 1686, which provided the land grant that established the village of Breuklen in the colony of New York. He and his wife, Femmetje Bergen (nee Theunis) had five children.

Michael Hansen Bergen's son, Hans Michielzse Bergen (baptized March 11, 1689) was a baker who resided near Brooklyn Ferry with his wife, Rachel (nee Bensing or Benson). They had seven children, among them Tunis Bergen (baptized October 15, 1730), who held civil and military office in Brooklyn. Tunis and his wife, Johanna (nee Stoothoff) had nine children, including their son, Garret Bergen.

Garret Bergen (born January 11, 1772) held civil and church office in Brooklyn, and was married to Jane Wyckoff on January 6, 1806. Together they had eleven children, including their first born, Teunis G. Bergen, who was born on October 6, 1806.

From the guide to the Teunis G. Bergen and Bergen family collection, 1639-1893, (Brooklyn Historical Society) 1819 May 31 Born Walter Whitman in West Hills, Huntington Township, N.Y. to Walter and Louisa (VanVelsor) Whitman 1823 Whitman family moved to Brooklyn 1825 1830 Attended Brooklyn public schools 1830 1831 Worked as office boy for lawyer and doctor 1831 1832 Printing apprentice for Long Island Patriot 1832 1835 Worked as compositor for Long Island Star 1836 1838 Taught school on Long Island 1838 1839 Worked on two newspapers, Long Islander and Long Island Democrat 1840 Campaigned for Martin Van Buren 1840 1841 Taught school on Long Island 1841 Moved to New York City; worked as compositor for The New World 1842 1845 Worked for and contributed to various newspapers in New York City 1845 1846 Returned to Brooklyn and worked for Evening Star 1846 1848 Edited Brooklyn's Daily Eagle 1848 Left Daily Eagle, went to New Orleans to edit Daily Crescent. Resigned and returned to Brooklyn. 1848 1849 Founded and edited Weekly Freeman, a "free-soil" newspaper 1849 1854 Operated printing office, bookstore, and house building business and did freelance journalism 1855 Copyrighted first edition of Leaves of Grass 1855 1856 Wrote for Life Illustrated; published second edition of Leaves of Grass 1857 1860 Edited Brooklyn Daily Times 1860 Published third edition of Leaves of Grass 1861 1862 Wrote freelance journalism; visited soldiers in New York Hospital; visited wounded brother in Fredericksburg 1863 1864 Moved to Washington, D.C.; worked as clerk in Army Paymaster's Office; visited military hospitals; returned to Brooklyn for 6 months in 1864 1865 Returned to Washington, D.C. and worked as clerk in Indian Bureau of Department of the Interior; began and suspended printing of Drum-Taps; discharged by Secretary James Harlan for writing "obscene" poetry; transferred to clerkship in Attorney General's Office; again published Drum-Taps and Sequel; began relationship with Peter Doyle 1866 William D. O'Connor published The Good Gray Poet, a defense co-written by Whitman in response to Whitman's firing by Harlan 1867 4th edition of Leaves of Grass published 1868 Poems of Walt Whitman published in London 1870 5th edition of Leaves of Grass published 1873 Suffered paralytic stroke; mother died on May 23rd; moved in with brother George in Camden, N.J. 1874 Discharged from his position in Washington, D.C. 1876 Published Centennial edition of Leaves of Grass and Two Rivulets, and Memoranda During the War; befriended Harry Stafford 1879 Gave first Lincoln lecture in New York 1882 Publicity concerning the suppression of Leaves of Grass in Boston resulted in unprecedented sales 1888 Suffered a second paralytic stroke; made will naming Richard Maurice Bucke, Thomas Harned, and Horace Traubel literary executors 1889 70th birthday commemorated in Camden's Compliment to Walt Whitman 1892 Died March 26th; buried in Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, N.J. From the guide to the Trent Collection of Whitmaniana, 1841-1992, bulk 1845-1849, 1854-1857, and 1864-1892, (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University)

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External CPF Relations (Same As)

Whitman, Walt (1819-1892)

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http://catalogue.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/cb119291430/PUBLIC


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Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892

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http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79081476


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Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892

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https://catalog.archives.gov/id/10581715


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Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892

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http://viaf.org/viaf/2478331


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Walt Whitman

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman


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http://www.worldcat.org/wcidentities/lccn-n79081476


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eng

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Subjects

Invitation cards


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American poetry--19th century


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American literature


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City and Town Life


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English literature--19th century


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Poetry


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American prose literature


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Safe-conducts


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Presidents--Election--1840


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Poets, American--19th century


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Poets, American


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Presidents--United States--Election--1840


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Poets, American--Correspondence


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Travelers--19th century--Diaries


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Civil war


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Education--New York (State)--Long Island


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Railroad travel--19th century


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English poetry--19th century


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Poetry, American


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Busts


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Manuscripts, American


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Archival resources


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Whitman family


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Pneumonia


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Legislators--United States


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Poets, American--19th century--Archives


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Surveying


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American poetry


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Poets, American--19th century--Correspondence


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Authors, American--19th century


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Labor movement--History


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Labor unions--History


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Conveyancing--New York (State)


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Political parties--History


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Authors, American--19th century--Correspondence


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American literature--19th century


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Military passes


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Authors, American


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Genealogy


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Women in literature


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Sculpture


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Deeds--New York (State)--Kings County


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Authors, American--19th century--Archives


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Nationalities

US


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Occupations