Macleish, Archibald

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1892-07-05
Death 1982-04-20
US
English

Biographical notes:

Archibald MacLeish (1892-1982) was an American poet. Kaiser is a professor of comparative literature at Harvard.

From the description of Letters to Walter Jacob Kaiser, 1955-1957 and undated. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612367921

MacLeish (1892-1982) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American poet, playwright, teacher, librarian of Congress, and public official. He was also Boylston professor at Harvard (1949-1962).

From the description of Scratch : manuscript, 1971. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 80775633

American poet and public official.

From the description of For H.C. [Pony Rock for the memory of H.T.C.] : [n.p.] : autograph manuscript of the poem signed, 1928. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270609204

Archibald MacLeish (1892-1982) was an American poet and a 1919 graduate of Harvard Law School.

From the description of Note to Morris L. Cohen, 1976. (Harvard Law School Library). WorldCat record id: 235103225

American poet and playwright.

From the description of Letters, 1939-1959. (University of Iowa Libraries). WorldCat record id: 233100112

MacLeish (1892-1982) was a Pulitizer Prize winning American poet, playwright, teacher, Librarian of Congress, and public official. He was also Boylston professor at Harvard.

From the description of Plays, 1957-1968. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 80094176

The American Friends of Spanish Democracy (originally called Friends of Spanish Democracy) was founded in New York City in 1936 by a group of clergymen and intellectuals under the leadership of Roger Baldwin, a member of the executive committee, and Bishop Robert L. Paddock, the chairman. John Dewey was named vice-chairman but his role appears to have been largely honorific. The objective of the organization was to arouse support for the Loyalist government during the Spanish Civil War. By organizing public appeals, petitions and letters of protest and by disseminating information on the situation in Spain, it hoped to counteract the effects of fascist propaganda and bring pressure on the U.S. President and Congress to end the arms embargo against Spain. It also raised funds for medical aid and refugee relief which were distributed by the North American Committee to Aid Spanish Democracy. By decision of its executive committee the organization was dissolved in 1939.

From the guide to the American Friends of Spanish Democracy records, 1935-1939, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Two letters written by Archibald MacLeish to publisher William Ewert regarding Lawrence Thompson's biography of Robert Frost. In the letter of October 10th, MacLeish also mentions the opening of one of his plays in New York City.

From the description of Letters : Uphill Farm, Conway, Mass. to William Ewert, Concord, New Hampshire, 1970 August 15 and October 10. (Manchester City Library). WorldCat record id: 31855942

Archibald MacLeish was an American essayist, literary critic, playwright, screenwriter, and poet.

From the description of Archibald MacLeish collection of papers, 1923-1981. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 144652025

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish collection of papers, 1923-1981, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Archibald MacLeish (1892-1982), poet, playwright, and government official, won Pulitzer Prizes in 1932, 1952, and 1959 for Conquistador, Collected Poems, 1917-1952, and J. B. He was editor of Fortune magazine in the 1930s, served as Librarian of Congress, 1939-44 and Assistant Secretary of State for Public and Cultural Affairs, 1944-45, and was professor at Harvard University, 1949-62.

From the description of Archibald MacLeish collection, 1914-1982 (inclusive). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702131613

Poet, playwright, government official, and Librarian of Congress.

From the description of Papers of Archibald MacLeish, 1907-1981 (bulk 1925-1970). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71069990

Archibald MacLeish, poet, playwright, and Librarian of Congress, won Pulitzer Prizes in 1932, 1952, and 1959 for Conquistador, Collected Poems, 1917-1952, and J. B. He was editor of Fortune magazine in the 1930s, served as Librarian of Congress, 1939-44 and Assistant Secretary of State for Public and Cultural Affairs, 1944-45, and was professor at Harvard University, 1949-62.

From the description of Archibald MacLeish collection addition, 1801-1995. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702184268

American poet.

From the description of Letter, 1977 December 15, to Amanda Kane [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809823

A biographical sketch of Archibald MacLeish can be found in the finding aid for the Archibald MacLeish Collection YCAL MSS 38.

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish Collection Addition, 1801-1995, (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

Poet, playwright, government official, and Librarian of Congress; d. 1982.

From the description of Papers, 1907-1981 (bulk 1925-1970). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122578109

American poet and librarian.

From the description of Letter [manuscript] : Hobe Sound, Florida, to John Norbutt, n.y. January 25. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647810642

From the description of Letters, 1976 and n.d., to Dick [Richard B. McAdoo] [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647810716

From the description of Letter, 1922 September 6, Cambridge, Massachusetts, to "Miss Loosy Prat" [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647804619

From the description of Letter [manuscript] New York, to Ernest A. Costello, Meriden, Connecticut, 1947 March 4. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647806248

Archibald MacLeish was born in Glencoe, Illinois on May 7, 1892 to Martha Hillard and Andrew MacLeish, a dry goods merchant. After graduating from Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut he entered Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1911. He married Ada Hitchcock in 1916 and served in the United States Army from 1917-1919. He received his L.L.B. from Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts and practiced law with Choate, Hall and Steward, Boston, Massachusetts, from 1920 -1923. After living in Paris, France from 1923-1928, he purchased Uphill Farm in Conway, Massachusetts. From 1929-1938, he was the editor of FORTUNE Magazine. MacLeish then held a number of federal appointments, including: Librarian of Congress, 1939-1944; Director, Office of Facts and Figures, War Department, 1941-1942; Assistant Director, Office of War Information, War Department, 1942-1943; Assistant Secretary of State for Cultural Affairs, 1944-1945. He served as Chairman of the American Delegation at the London conference of UNESCO in November of 1945. the primary purpose of which was to draft the constitution for UNESCO. From 1946-1948 he served as a member of the Executive Committee of the United States National Commission for UNESCO. In 1946, he was appointed Chairman of the American Delegation to the First General Conference of UNESCO in Paris, France and was elected the first American member of the Executive Board of UNESCO. Leaving government service, MacLeish became the Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts from 1949-1962; the President of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, 1953-1956; and Simpson Lecturer at Amherst College, 1963-1967. He died in Boston, Massachusetts on April 20, 1982.

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish Papers MS 0046., 1940-1948, 1946-1948, (Mount Holyoke College Archives and Special Collections)

MacLeish was Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard.

From the description of Papers of Archibald MacLeish, 1962. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 76973112

Archibald MacLeish "(7 May 1892-20 Apr. 1982), poet and playwright, was born in Glencoe, Illinois, the son of Andrew MacLeish, a prosperous dry-goods merchant, and Martha Hillard MacLeish, a college professor ... Once considered a major modernist poet of the generation that followed Pound and Eliot, MacLeish remains notable as one of those who influenced the development of modern poetry. With his sensitivity to technique and his lyrical gift, he expressed common existential anxieties of the time."-- "MacLeish, Archibald." American National Biography Online. http://www.anb.org/ (Retrieved January 29, 2009).

From the description of Archibald MacLeish poem, 193-?. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 300479092

Archibald MacLeish was a lawyer, statesman, and author, best known for his poetry. Educated in law at Yale and Harvard, he saw action in World War I and practiced law before deciding to concentrate on poetry. A distinguished poetry career led to five years as the Librarian of Congress, and tenure as assistant Secretary of State; he later chaired the first UNESCO conference in Paris, and had a long career as Harvard Professor of Rhetoric. He wrote poetry, drama, criticism, and social commentary, and won three Pulitzer Prizes.

From the description of Archibald MacLeish letters to Jon Bracker and theater flier, 1959-1975. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 57358479

Poet, Librarian of Congress.

From the description of Postcard, 1976 Mar. 15, Conway, Mass., to Amanda Stewart Bryan Kane, Charlottesville, Va. [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647809527

Archibald MacLeish was Librarian of Congress from 1939-1944.

From the description of First annual report as Librarian of Congress : manuscript, 1940. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 49373513

Biographical Note

1892, May 7 Born, Glencoe, Ill. 1915 A.B., Yale University,New Haven, Conn. 1916 Married Ada Hitchcock 1917 1919 Served in United States Army 1919 LL.B., Harvard University,Cambridge, Mass. 1920 1923 Member of Boston, Mass., law firm, Choate, Hall and Stewart 1923 1928 Moved to Paris, France, devoting time to travel and literature 1929 1938 Editor, Fortune magazine 1932 Pulitzer Prize in poetry 1939 1944 Librarian of Congress 1941 1942 Director, Office of Facts and Figures,War Department 1942 1943 Assistant Director, Office of War Information, War Department 1944 American delegate, Conference of Allied Ministers of Education,London, England 1944 1945 Assistant secretary of state for cultural affairs 1945 London London Londonderry Fire Rescue Department Central Station New London Hospital New London Elementary School Mount London London Crown London Grove Hilton London Kensington North Londonderry Red Roof Inn New London New London Church London Town Shopping Center New London Harbor Lighthouse Mrongondoni Township of South Londonderry Comfort Inn London - Wellington Road Londongbiang Jack London Junior High School Days Htl London South Ruislip Londonderry Road Public School London Post Office Glondong London Marsh Rivulet Chairman, American delegation to London conference to draft constitution for UNESCO Participated in drafting of United Nations charter at the San Francisco Conference 1946 Paris, France Paris Les Paris Paris Chairman, American delegation to the First General Conference of UNESCO,Paris, France First American member, executive council of UNESCO 1949 1962 Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, Mass. 1953 Pulitzer Prize in poetry Bollingen Prize in poetry National Book Award in poetry 1953 1956 President, American Academy of Arts and Letters 1959 Pulitzer Prize in drama 1963 1967 Simpson lecturer, Amherst College,Amherst, Mass. 1977 Presidential Medal of Freedom 1978 National Medal for literature 1982, April 20 Died, Boston, Mass.

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish Papers, 1907-1981, (bulk 1925-1970), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Archibald MacLeish (1892-1982) was a Pulitzer Prize winning poet and author, awarded the prize for his Conquistador (1933), Collected Poems (1917-52), and J. B. (1958). In 1939, President Roosevelt nominated MacLeish Librarian of Congress and, in 1944, Assistant Secretary of State for Cultural Affairs. He resigned this post in 1945 and in 1946, served as assistant head of the U.S. delegation to UNESCO.

H. (Henry) Tatnall Brown (1900-?) authored several works on American journalist, poet, and author Christopher Morley.

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish Letter (MS 135), 16 February 1939, (University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.)

Archibald MacLeish, poet, playwright, and government official, was born on May 7, 1892, in Glencoe, Illinois. He graduated from Yale in 1915, entered Harvard Law School, and married Ada Hitchcock in 1916. After the United States entered World War I, he enlisted as a private in the army, served in the artillery in France, and was discharged with the rank of captain. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1919 and the next year joined the Boston law firm of Choate, Hall, and Stewart. In 1923 the MacLeish family moved to Paris, where they remained for five years. After returning to the United States, he travelled to Mexico to follow the route of Cortez's army in preparation for writing Conquistador .

During the 1930s MacLeish was an editor of Fortune magazine. He served as Librarian of Congress, 1939-44, Assistant Secretary of State for Public and Cultural Affairs, 1944-45, and Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Poetry at Harvard University, 1949-62. MacLeish's poetry and dramatic writings earned him Pulitizer Prizes in 1932, 1952, and 1959, the Bollingen Prize and the National Book Award for poetry in 1953, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and the National Medal for Literature in 1978. Archibald MacLeish died in Boston on April 20, 1982.

His major works of poetry include Tower of Ivory (1917), The Pot of Earth (1925), The Hamlet of A. MacLeish (1928), New Found Land (1930), Conquistador (1932), America Was Promises (1939), Collected Poems, 1917-1952 (1952), and Songs for Eve (1954). MacLeish also wrote several plays, some of the most important being Panic (1935), The Fall of the City (1937), Air Raid (1938), J.B. (1958), Herakles (1967), and Scratch (1971). Counted among his works of prose are A Time to Speak (1941), The American Story (1944), Poetry and Experience, (1960), and A Continuing Journey (1968).

From the guide to the Archibald MacLeish collection, 1914-1982 (inclusive), (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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SNAC ID:
36579488

Subjects:

  • Copyright
  • Authors--Political and social views.
  • Theater--Production and direction
  • Liberty Bell--Drama
  • Poetry, Modern--Study and teaching
  • United States Department of State -- UNESCO Relations Staff
  • Theater--20th century
  • Unesco -- Management
  • American periodicals.
  • MacLeish Symposium
  • Frescoes for Mr. Rockefeller's city
  • Lectures and lecturing
  • Pulitzer Prizes
  • Poetry, Modern.
  • Drama --Technique.
  • American literature--20th century
  • Authors--Political and social views
  • Dramatists--20th century
  • Authors, American--20th century--Archives
  • Dramatists, American--20th century--Manuscripts
  • Evening's journey to Conway, Massachusetts (Drama)
  • International Cooperation -- History -- 20th Century
  • Poets, American --20thcentury.
  • Herakles (DRAMA)
  • Poetry--Study and teaching
  • Playwriting
  • Popular culture
  • Refugees -- Spain
  • Poets, American --20th century.
  • American poetry
  • Archibald MacLeish: Reflections (book)
  • Verse drama, American--20th century
  • Authors and publishers
  • Night watch in the city of Boston
  • Political poetry
  • Collected poems of Archibald MacLeish
  • Fortune (Magazine)
  • Introduction of speakers
  • Unesco -- History
  • Drama--Technique
  • An evening's journey to Conway, Massachusetts
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • American poetry--20th century
  • Memorial Day
  • Portraits
  • Poets, American--20th century
  • Uphill Farm
  • MacLeish, Archibald, 1892-1982
  • Historical drama, American--20th century
  • Theater --Production and direction.
  • Publishers and publishing
  • Arciniegas, German, 1900-1999
  • Artists, American
  • American literature.
  • American drama--20th century
  • Authors, American--Political and social views
  • Fourth of July--Poetry
  • Rosen, Aaron Tani
  • Publishers and publishing.
  • Authors, American--Correspondence
  • Drama
  • Drama--20th century
  • Embargo -- Spain
  • Hansen, Kurt Heinrich
  • Playwriting.
  • Obituaries
  • Radio plays
  • Murder in the cathedral (Drama)
  • Neutral trade with belligerents
  • Playwriting--20th century
  • Bombing, Aerial -- Spain
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Promptbooks
  • U.S. National Commission for UNESCO
  • Poetry
  • Hamlet (Legendary character)--Poetry
  • Conquistador
  • Authors, American
  • Speeches, addresses, etc.
  • Firuski, Maurice
  • J.B. (Drama)
  • American literature
  • Drama.
  • The great American Fourth of July parade
  • American periodicals
  • Poetry, Modern
  • Unesco
  • World War, 1939-1945--United States.
  • Art, American
  • Dedication services
  • Authors, American--Europe.

Occupations:

  • Librarians of Congress.
  • Librarians--United States.
  • Dramatists.
  • Public officials.
  • College teachers--Massachusetts--Cambridge.
  • Periodical editors--United States.
  • Poets.
  • Authors.
  • Translators.
  • Authors, American.

Places:

  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Conway (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Cambridge (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Conway (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Conway (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Conway (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Conway (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)