Canaday, John, 1907-1985

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1907-02-01
Death 1985-07-19

Biographical notes:

John Canaday (1907-1985) was an art critic and author.

From the description of Papers, ca. 1980-1983. (University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center). WorldCat record id: 30019844

Art critic (New York, N.Y.).

From the description of John Canaday interviews, 1971 Aug. 17-Aug. 24. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 220178367

John Canaday was an American author and educator, best known as a respected art historian. Born in Kansas and educated at the Universities of Texas and Yale, Canaday taught art history at Virginia and Tulane, and later worked for the Philadelphia Museum of Art; he was a long-time art critic for the New York Times. His writing career began in the 1940s with a series of acclaimed mystery novels, written under the pseudonym Matthew Head, before choosing to concentrate his efforts on art history. Notable accomplishments include the twelve-volume Metropolitan Seminars in Art, the four-volume Lives of the Painters, and What is Art?, a brief yet comprehensive overview. His writing style and knowledge were consistently praised, and his books were enjoyed by serious students and casual readers alike. Canaday died in 1985.

From the description of John Canaday letter to Francis Hyslop, Jr., 1962 Sept. 21. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 144873620

John Canaday (1907-1985) was an art critic from New York, N.Y.

From the description of Oral history interview with John Canaday, 1971 Aug. 17-24 [sound recording]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 495595038

American critic.

From the description of Letter and drawings, 1972 & 1973 [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821808

From the description of Portrait of James Joyce [manuscript], 1947. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647976692

John Edwin Canaday was a writer on art history and art criticism who served as art critic for the New York Times from 1959-1977.

From the description of John Canaday collection of music recordings [sound recording], 1925-1945. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 123527579

Born in Fort Scott, Kansas, John Edwin Canaday (1907-1985) was one of six children of Franklin and Agnes F. Canaday. At the age of seven, Canaday moved with his family to Dallas, Texas and then to San Antonio. In 1924, he enrolled at the University of Texas, where he met life-long friend Miriam Brown Keeler and received his undergraduate degree in French and English literature. After receiving his Master’s degree in art history and painting from Yale University in 1933, Canaday taught art history at several colleges and universities, including Tulane University and the University of Virginia. On September 19, 1935, he married Katherine S. Hoover, with whom he had two sons. After teaching for ten years, Canaday served as a French interpreter for the Bureau of Economic Welfare in the Belgian Congo. He joined the United States Marine Corps in 1944 and subsequently was appointed a lieutenant in the South Pacific during World War II. Following his service, Canaday was head of the art school at Newcomb College in New Orleans (1950 - 1952), and chief of the educational division at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (1953 - 1959). A prolific writer, Canaday published many books on art historical topics, including The Lives of Painters (1969) and What is Art? An Introduction to Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (1980). He also wrote several mysteries set in the Congo. From 1959 through 1976, Canaday wrote art criticism columns for the New York Times, for which he gained a great deal of notoriety and acclaim.

Source:

Curlee, Kendall. Canaday, John Edwin. Handbook of Texas Online. Accessed January 7, 2011. http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fcabt .

From the guide to the Canaday, John Edwin, Papers 75-19., 1925-1985, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Art critic; New York, N.Y.

Died 1985.

From the description of John Canaday papers, 1932-1973. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122502780

Born in Fort Scott, Kansas, John Edwin Canaday (1907-1985) was one of six children of Franklin and Agnes F. Canaday.

At the age of seven, Canaday moved with his family to Dallas, Texas and then to San Antonio. In 1924, he enrolled at the University of Texas, where he met life-long friend Miriam Brown Keeler and received his undergraduate degree in French and English literature. After receiving his Master's degree in art history and painting from Yale University in 1933, Canaday taught art history at several colleges and universities, including Tulane University and the University of Virginia. On September 19, 1935, he married Katherine S. Hoover, with whom he had two sons. After teaching for ten years, Canaday served as a French interpreter for the Bureau of Economic Welfare in the Belgian Congo. He joined the United States Marine Corps in 1944 and subsequently was appointed a lieutenant in the South Pacific during World War II. Following his service, Canaday was head of the art school at Newcomb College in New Orleans (1950 - 1952), and chief of the educational division at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (1953 - 1959). A prolific writer, Canaday published many books on art historical topics, including The Lives of Painters (1969) and What is Art? An Introduction to Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (1980). He also wrote several mysteries set in the Congo. From 1959 through 1976, Canaday wrote art criticism columns for the New York Times, for which he gained a great deal of notoriety and acclaim.

From the description of Canaday, John Edwin, Papers, 1925-1985 (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 717176214

John Canaday (1907-) was an American writer and art critic for the New York Times .

Born in Fort Scott, Kansas, on Feb. 1, 1907, Canaday received his B.A. from the University of Texas in 1929 and his M.A. from Yale in 1933. From 1938 to 1950, Mr. Canaday taught art history in the department of architecture at the University of Virginia. From 1950-1952, he served as director of the Newcomb School of Art at Tulane University. In 1953, he became Chief of the Division of Education of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a position which he held until 1959. Beginning in 1959, Canaday served as art critic for the New York Times . He wrote a series, "Metropolitan Seminars in Art," as well as Mainstreams of Modern Art, Embattled Critic, and articles for various magazines. He also published seven mystery novels under the pseudonym "Matthew Head."

From the guide to the John Canaday Papers, 1954-1966, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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SNAC ID:
33071133

Subjects:

  • Artists -- 20th century
  • Writers and critics--20th century
  • Art Critics--20th century
  • Art critics
  • Art criticism.
  • Detective and mystery stories
  • Authors, American.
  • Piano music (Jazz)
  • Art critics -- United States.
  • Literature -- American Fiction
  • Art Critics -- 20th century
  • Writers and critics -- 20th century
  • Art critics--20th century--Correspondence
  • Art
  • Novelists, American.
  • Jazz
  • Authors and publishers
  • Artists--Biography
  • Art--History
  • Art Historians--20th century
  • Artists--20th century
  • Piano music (Blues)
  • Art Historians -- 20th century
  • Art criticism

Occupations:

  • Authors.
  • Novelists.
  • Collectors.
  • Art critics.

Places:

  • Austin (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • San Antonio (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • San Antonio (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • Austin (Tex.) (as recorded)