Redi, Francesco, 1626-1698

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1626-02-18
Death 1698-03-01
Italians
Italian

Biographical notes:

Epithet: of Florence, man of letters and scientist

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000298.0x0001eb

Redi was an Italian physician and poet; Angelo Maria Arcioni (1604-ca. 1689) was an Italian poet.

From the guide to the Letters to Angelo Maria Arcioni, 1678-1702., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Epithet: of Florence

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000001033.0x000028

Redi was an Italian physician and poet; Angelo Maria Arcioni was an Italian poet.

From the description of Letters to Angelo Maria Arcioni, 1678-1702. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 78113745

Rufus Ivory Cole served as the the director and physician-in-charge (1909-1937) of the Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, the first hospital in the United States devoted primarily to the investigation of disease. Cole's medical research centered on problems relating to immunity to diseases of the respiratory system, particularly pneumonia

From the guide to the Rufus Ivory Cole papers, ca. 1900-1966, 1900-1966, (American Philosophical Society)

In 1666 Grand Duke Ferdinando II appointed Redi as his first physician and director of the grand-ducal "Spezieria" (pharmacy): positions in which he was confirmed by Cosimo III in 1670, when he became grand duke. So Redi spent much of his life at the Medici's court and was, after Galileo, a unique example of scientist and courtier. He stressed the importance of medicine based on Hippocratic principles, and he emphasised the importance of prevention based on a balanced diet and the use of exclusively natural remedies. Most importantly, he helped invent the method of experimental biology and was involved in the greatest discovery of 17th century medicine: the origin of scabies from mites. His first publication, in 1664, was study of the toxicity, the origin, and the mode of injection of snake venom.

From the description of Francesco Redi letters, ca. 1683-1693. (National Library of Medicine). WorldCat record id: 50124896

In 1666 Grand Duke Ferdinando II appointed Redi as his First Physician and director of the grand-ducal "Spezieria" (Pharmacy): positions in which he was confirmed by Cosimo III in 1670, when he became Grand Duke. So Redi spent much of his life at the Medici's Court and was, after Galileo, a unique example of scientist and courtier. He stressed the importance of medicine based on Hippocratic principles, and he emphasised the importance of prevention based on a balanced diet and the use of exclusively natural remedies. Most importantly, he helped invent the method of experimental biology and was involved in the greatest discovery of 17th century medicine: the origin of scabies from mites. His first publication, in 1664, was study of the toxicity, the origin and the mode of injection of snake venom.

From the guide to the Francesco Redi Letters, 1683-1693, (History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6x35rkv
Ark ID:
w6x35rkv
SNAC ID:
38612052

Subjects:

  • History
  • Medicine
  • Hospitals--New York (State)--Administration
  • Snakes
  • Italian poetry--18th century
  • Medicine--Research--United States
  • Italian poetry--17th century
  • Literature
  • Alternative medicine

Occupations:

  • Poets

Places:

  • Great Britain (as recorded)