Stephens, Alexander Hamilton, 1812-1883

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1812-02-11
Death 1883-03-04
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Former vice-president of the Confederate States of America.

From the description of Letter, 1866 Dec. 26, Crawfordville, Georgia, to Henry Bradley Plant. (Boston Athenaeum). WorldCat record id: 260819402

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883), lawyer, politician, Vice President of the Confederate States of America.

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1844-1882. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38476996

Lawyer, journalist, governor of Georgia, U.S. senator and representative from Georgia, and vice president of the Confederate States of America.

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens papers, 1784-1886 (bulk 1850-1883). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71063777

E.E. Brown, proprietor of Brown Hotel, Macon, Ga., political center of Georgia.

From the description of Letter of Stephens, "Liberty Hall," Crawfordville, Ga., to E.E. Brown, proprietor of Brown Hotel, Macon, Ga., political center of Georgia, 14 Sept. 1875 [manuscript] 1875-1937. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647968568

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883), lawyer, politician, vice president of the Confederate States of America, and Georgia Governor, born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Letter to R.H. Norris, 1863 Aug. 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38478220

Member of Congress from Georgia 1843-1859; vice president of the Confederate States of America; returned to Congress 1873-1882; elected governor of Georgia 1882.

From the description of ALS : Washington, D.C.[?], to Frederick Watts, [ca. 1875] Aug. 20. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122365128

C.S.A. Vice-President.

From the description of Alexander Stephens letter [manuscript], 1867 March 13. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 700053996

Alexander H. Stephens was vice president of the Confederate States of America. His brother, Linton Stephens, was a lieutenant colonel of the 15th Georgia Regiment, Confederate States of America.

From the guide to the Alexander Hamilton Stephens Papers, ., 1834-1872, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883) was a lawyer and politician born in Wilkes County, Georgia. He served as a United States congressman, vice president of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865), and Governor of Georgia (1882-1883).

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens carte de visite and envelope, 1800s. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 441831927

Most famous for serving as the vice president of the Confederacy, Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a near-constant force in state and national politics for a half century. born near Crawfordville, in Taliaferro County, on February 11, 1812, to Margaret Grier and Andrew Baskins Stephens, the young Stephens was orphaned at fourteen, which intensified his already melancholic disposition. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832 and gained admittance to the bar two years later. There followed a steady and uninterrupted rise to political prominence.

From the description of Stephens, Alexander Hamilton collection, 1841-1882. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 274184206

Statesman and author.

From the description of Signature of Alexander Hamilton Stephens [manuscript], 1882 March 15. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647817272

Vice President of the Confederate States of America and legislator and governor of Georgia.

From the description of Papers of Alexander Hamilton Stephens, 1834-1880. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71067878

American statesman.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Crawfordsville, to Dr. R.H. Salter of Boston, 1867 Feb. 10. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270574650

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, to William Alexander of Crawfordville, Ga., 184 Feb. 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270579111

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, D.C., to T.B. Thorpe, 1858 May 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270579114

Alexander Hamilton Stephens served as vice president of the Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War, as a U.S. congressman before and after the war, and as governor of Georgia from 1882 until his death in 1883. Born in poverty in Crawfordville, Ga., he acquired his education through the generosity of several benefactors. Following a brief stint as a schoolteacher, Stephens turned to the study of law and served for some years as a successful lawyer in Crawfordville. He was elected as a Whig to a U.S. congressional seat in 1843 and quickly rose to prominence as one of the foremost southern Whigs, though he later left the party to join the Constitutional Union Party and, in 1855, the Democratic Party. While in Congress he was instrumental in getting the Kansas-Nebraska Act passed. Though he initially opposed Georgia's secession from the Union, he later joined the secessionists and was elected vice-president of the Confederacy in 1861. Following the war, he served several terms as a U.S. congressman, resigning from Congress in 1882, when he was elected governor of Georgia.

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens papers, 1834-1872. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 314376967

Alexander Hamilton Stephens, born in Wilkes County, Georgia, served as the Vice-President of the Confederate States of America and as a congressman for the State of Georgia after the Civil War.

From the description of Letter, 1862. (Atlanta History Center). WorldCat record id: 31690469

Alexander H. Stephens was a Georgia lawyer, politician and Vice President of the Confederate States of America. He lived from 1812-1883.

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1823-1954. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 20188613

Alexander Hamilton Stephens, lawyer, legislator, and Georgia governor, was born 11 February 1812, in Wilkes County, Georgia, and died 4 March 1883, in Atlanta, Georgia. Alexander H. Stephens graduated from the University of Georgia (1832); was admitted to the Georgia bar (1834); served as a Georgia legislator (1836-1843); served as a U.S. legislator from Georgia (1843-1859; 1873-1882); and joined the Democratic Party (1852). Stephens was a spokesman for Southern interests, a champion of slavery and states rights, and became vice-president of the Confederacy (1861), though he opposed many of the policies of the new government and attempted peace negotiations with Lincoln (1863; 1865). He was elected governor of Georgia (1882), authored two books (1870, 1872), and was editor of the SOUTHERN SUN, an Atlanta newspaper. John Alexander Stephens, the son of Alexander Stephens's brother, John Lindsay Stephens, died in 1887. John A. Stephens served in the Confederate Army with the 15th Georgia Regiment, practiced law in Crawfordville and Atlanta, Georgia, where he was a partner of Lucius J. Gartrell, and was Adjutant General of Georgia (1883-1886).

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens collection, 1800-1899. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 173862968

Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a lawyer, politician, Vice President of the Confederate States of America, and Georgia Governor. He was born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens letter to R. C. Daniel, 1860 December 14. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 463292232

Stephens represented Georgia in Congress from 1843 to 1859. In 1861, he was elected vice-president of the Confederate States of America. He was elected governor of Georgia in 1882 and served until his death in 1883.

From the description of Letter, 1848. (Auburn University). WorldCat record id: 29717444

Stephens, a Georgia lawyer and politician, among other posts served in the U. S. Congress (1843-1859, 1873-1882) and as vice president of the Confederacy.

From the description of Letters, 1860, 1861, and 1872. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 436775737

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883), lawyer, politician, Vice-President of the Confederate States of America, and Georgia Governor, born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Letters to J. Glancy Jones, 1868, 1871-1872. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38478221

American politician.

From the description of Signature to printed form : Washington, 1879 Dec. 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270581128

From the description of Autograph note signed, added to a letter from H.R. Harris, W.H. Felton, and H.P. Bell, ca. 1877-79. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270580450

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883), lawyer, politician, Vice President of the Confederate States of America, and Georgia Governor, born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1831-1843. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38478303

"Most famous for serving as the vice president of the Confederacy, Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a near-constant force in state and national politics for a half century. Born near Crawfordville [Georgia], in Taliaferro County, on February 11, 1812, to Margaret Grier and Andrew Baskins Stephens, the young Stephens was orphaned at fourteen, which intensified his already melancholic disposition. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832 and gained admittance to the bar two years later. There followed a steady and uninterrupted rise to political prominence...Georgians returned Stephens to the House of Representatives in 1877, and he served there until 1882. That same year he was elected governor of the state but died in office on March 4, 1883." - "Alexander Stephens." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved September 4, 2008)

From the description of Alexander Stephens letter, 1862 August 3. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 432659877

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens letter, 1872 February 4. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 341367920

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens letter, 1875 April 7. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 319708997

Alexander H. Stephens was vice-president of the Confederate States of America.

From the description of Papers, 1863-1866. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122557642

Alexander Stephens (1812-1883), lawyer, journalist, author, statesman, was elected vice president of the Confederate States (1861-1865). After the war, he was elected to U.S. Senate from Georgia, but never presented his credentials. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1873-1 882), and as governor of Georgia (1882-1883).

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens Papers, 1784-1886 1850-1883. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122387833

Alexander Hamilton Stephens was vice president of the Confederate States of America.

From the description of Alexander Hamilton Stephens papers, 1834-1872. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 26380318

Vice-President of Confederate States and Governor of Georgia.

From the description of Papers, 1834-1880. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155542012

"Most famous for serving as the vice president of the Confederacy, Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a near-constant force in state and national politics for a half century. Born near Crawfordville [Georgia], in Taliaferro County, on February 11, 1812, to Margaret Grier and Andrew Baskins Stephens, the young Stephens was orphaned at fourteen, which intensified his already melancholic disposition. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832 and gained admittance to the bar two years later. There followed a steady and uninterrupted rise to political prominence...Georgians returned Stephens to the House of Representatives in 1877, and he served there until 1882. That same year he was elected governor of the state but died in office on March 4, 1883." - "Alexander Stephens." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved September 4, 2008)

Julius L. Brown (1848-1910) was the son of Joseph E. Brown and brother of Joseph M. Brown. He received an A.B in 1868 and an A.M. in 1869 from the University of Georgia and a B.L. from the Harvard College Law Department. -- "Brown, Julius L., b. 1848." University of Georgia Centennial Alumni Catalog. http://dlg.galib.uga.edu/centennialcatalog/html (Retrieved June 26, 2009)

From the description of Alexander Stephens letter to Julius L. Brown, 1869 December 10. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 420157433

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883) was a lawyer and a politician born in Wilkes County, Georgia. He served as a United States congressman, vice president of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865), and Governor of Georgia (1882-1883).

Robert Cunningham Daniel was born on 31 Oct 1807 in Wilkes County, Georgia. He died on 1 Dec 1862 in Penfield, Greene County, Georgia. He married Emily G Milner on 23 Jun 1831 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia. Currently, Globe Ridgebacks, located in Philomath, Georgia, operates out of the original home of Robert Cunningham Daniel. Established circa 1833, the house was built for, Robert Cunningham Daniel, and has remained in the family. His family enjoyed Shakespeare, and the house was named for the Globe Theatre in London.

From the description of Alexander Stephens photograph, undated. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 413359711

"A mid-nineteenth-century politician, Howell Cobb served as congressman (1843-51; 1855-57), Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (1849-51), governor of Georgia (1851-53), and secretary of the treasury (1857-60). Following Georgia's secession from the Union in 1861, he served as president of the Provisional Confederate Congress (1861-62) and a major general of the Confederate army." - "Howell Cobb." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved July 25, 2008)

"Most famous for serving as the vice president of the Confederacy, Alexander Hamilton Stephens was a near-constant force in state and national politics for a half century. Born near Crawfordville [Georgia], in Taliaferro County, on February 11, 1812, to Margaret Grier and Andrew Baskins Stephens, the young Stephens was orphaned at fourteen, which intensified his already melancholic disposition. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832 and gained admittance to the bar two years later. There followed a steady and uninterrupted rise to political prominence...Georgians returned Stephens to the House of Representatives in 1877, and he served there until 1882. That same year he was elected governor of the state but died in office on March 4, 1883." - "Alexander Stephens." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved September 4, 2008)

From the description of Alexander H. Stephens and Howell Cobb letters, 1848-1880. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 374038236

Biographical Note

  • 1812, Feb. 11: Born near Crawfordsville, Wilkes County (now Taliaferro County), Ga.
  • 1832: Graduated, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga.
  • 1834: Admitted to the bar, Crawfordsville, Ga.
  • 1836 - 1842 : Served in the Georgia house and senate
  • 1843 - 1859 : Served in U.S. House of Representatives
  • 1861: Member, Georgia secession convention; elected to congress of the Confederate States of America
  • 1861 - 1865 : Vice president, Confederate States of America
  • 1865: Headed unsuccessful Confederate Peace Commission at Hampton Roads, Va., with President Abraham Lincoln Arrested and confined at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor, Boston, Mass. Paroled
  • 1866: Elected U.S. senator from Georgia, but did not present his credentials
  • 1871: Became part owner and editor, Atlanta Southern Sun
  • 1872: Unsuccessful candidate for U.S. Senate
  • 1873 - 1882 : Served in U.S. House of Representatives
  • 1882 - 1883 : Governor of Georgia
  • 1883, Mar. 4: Died, Atlanta, Ga.

From the guide to the Alexander Hamilton Stephens Papers, 1784-1886, (bulk 1850-1883), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Mrs. Darling was born in New Hampshire in 1840, a descendant of Henry Adams who settled in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1636. She married Col. Edward Irving Darling, 22 years her senior, in 1860, and went with him to live at his Louisiana home. He died of wounds received in battle, December 2, 1863. Her only son was Edward Erving Darling, a minor musician-composer, who died July 13, 1894. Mrs. Darling suffered from repeated attacks of malarial fever and, after 1876, from deafness. Her years of widowhood were spent in writing Mrs. Darling's Letters, or Memoirs of the Civil War A Social Diplomat and other books.

From 1889 to 1896 her major interests and efforts were devoted to the founding of women's patriotic societies. Mrs. Darling's obsession for organizing and ruling patriotic societies, and her willingness to abandon one when her opinion or desires were thwarted, is illustrated by the rapid succession with which the societies followed each other: Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) founded October 11, 1890; Daughters of the Revolution (D.R.) founded June 18, 1891; Daughters of the United States of the War of 1812, founded January 8, 1892; founded because of disagreement over policies of the D. A. R., policies adopted over the protest of Mrs. Darling. This collection is composed almost entirely of letters written to her during these years of controversy. There are some delightful, pithy and well-written letters in the group.

From the guide to the Flora Adams Darling Papers, 1862-1908, (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

Alexander Hamilton Stephens was born in Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia on February 11, 1812 to Andrew B. and Margaret Grier Stephens. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Literary Society. He taught school for the next eighteen months while pursuing legal studies and passed the bar in Georgia in 1834. Stephens maintained a successful law practice for thirty-two years while simultaneously serving as an elected official in both state and federal political realms and as Vice President of the Confederate States of America. He died in 1883.

  • 1836: Elected to the Georgia House of Representatives as a Whig; served until 1840
  • 1842: Elected to the Georgia State Senate; served for one year.
  • 1843: Elected to the United States Congress; served until 1859
  • 1861: Elected to attend the Secession Convention of Georgia
  • 1861: Elected Vice President of the Confederate States of America
  • 1865: Arrested by the United States; served five months in prison
  • 1866: Elected to the United States Senate but not allowed to take his seat
  • 1873: Elected to United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ambrose R. Wright; served until his resignation in 1882
  • 1882: Elected Governor of Georgia
  • 1883, March 4: Died in Georgia

From the guide to the Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1823-1954 (bulk 1823-1883), (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University)

Alexander Hamilton Stephens was born in Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia on February 11, 1812 to Andrew B. and Margaret Grier Stephens. He graduated from Franklin College (later the University of Georgia) in 1832, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Literary Society. He taught school for the next eighteen months while pursuing legal studies and passed the bar in Georgia in 1834. Stephens maintained a successful law practice for thirty-two years while simultaneously serving as an elected official in both state and federal political realms and as Vice President of the Confederate States of America. He died in 1883.

  • 1836: Elected to the Georgia House of Representatives as a Whig; served until 1840
  • 1842: Elected to the Georgia State Senate; served for one year.
  • 1843: Elected to the United States Congress; served until 1859
  • 1861: Elected to attend the Secession Convention of Georgia
  • 1861: Elected Vice President of the Confederate States of America
  • 1865: Arrested by the United States; served five months in prison
  • 1866: Elected to the United States Senate but not allowed to take his seat
  • 1873: Elected to United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ambrose R. Wright; served until his resignation in 1882
  • 1882: Elected Governor of Georgia
  • 1883, March 4: Died in Georgia

From the guide to the Alexander H. Stephens Papers, 1823-1954 (bulk 1823-1883), (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University)

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