Akins, Zoë (1886-1958).

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1886-10-30
Death 1958-10-29
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Zoë Akins (1886-1958) was a dramatist, novelist, poet and screenwriter. Born in Missouri, Akins wrote plays for the better part of two decades before she moved to California in 1928 and worked as a screenwriter under contract to Paramount and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. She won the Pulitzer prize for her play, The old maid (1936), which she adapted from the story by Edith Wharton.

From the description of Papers of Zoë Akins, 1907-1951. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 228718369

Akins was born on Oct. 30, 1886 in Humansville, MO; early poetry published in the St. Louis Mirror; her first play produced in NY was The magical city (1919); Akins was made famous by her theatrical piece, Déclassée, starring Ethel Barrymore; her plays enjoyed great popularity in the 1920s and 1930s; she moved to CA in 1928; her Broadway hit, The Greeks had a word for it (1930) was filmed by Samuel Goldwyn in 1932; won the Pulitzer Prize with her 1935 stage adaptation of Edith Wharton's novel, The old maid; collaborated with George Cukor on film, Camille (1936), which starred Greta Garbo and Robert Taylor; died on Oct. 29, 1958 in Los Angeles.

From the description of Papers, 1915-1958. (University of California, Los Angeles). WorldCat record id: 38128618

American poet and dramatist.

From the description of Zoë Akins writings, [ca. 1900-1958]. (University of California, Berkeley). WorldCat record id: 86093740

Zoë Akins (1886-1958) was a dramatist, poet and screenwriter. In 1935, she won the Pulitzer Prize for her dramatization of Edith Wharton's story, The old maid. In addition to many screenplays and plays, Akins also authored two volumes of poetry, criticism, two novels, teleplays, magazine and newspaper articles.

From the description of Akins-Jannay Collection, 1920-1992. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 352893704

Biography

Akins was born on October 30, 1886 in Humansville, Missouri; early poetry published in the St. Louis Mirror; her first play produced in New York was The Magical City (1919); Akins was made famous by her theatrical piece, D?lass?, starring Ethel Barrymore; her plays enjoyed great popularity in the 1920s and 1930s; she moved to California in 1928; her Broadway hit, The Greeks Had a Word for It (1930) was filmed by Samuel Goldwyn in 1932; won the Pulitzer Prize with her 1935 stage adaptation of Edith Wharton's novel, The Old Maid ; collaborated with George Cukor on film, Camille (1936), which starred Greta Garbo and Robert Taylor; died on October 29, 1958 in Los Angeles.

From the guide to the Zoë Akins Papers, 1915-1958, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

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Subjects:

  • Women poets, American--20th century--Archives
  • Authors, American--20th century--Archival resources
  • Women poets, American--20th century
  • Women novelists, American--20th century--Archives
  • Women poets
  • Women dramatists
  • Poets, American
  • Women dramatists, American--20th century
  • Women screenwriters--Archives
  • Dramatists, American--20th century
  • Poets, American--20th century
  • Screenwriters--Archival resources
  • Dramatists, American
  • Women dramatists, American--20th century--Archives
  • Dramatists, American--20th century--Archival resources

Occupations:

  • Screenwriters--United States--Archival resources

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)