Brodie, Alexander O. (Alexander Oswald), 1849-1918

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1849-11-13
Death 1918-05-10
English

Biographical notes:

Territorial governor of Arizona from 1902 to 1905, engineer, and Rough Rider.

From the description of Brodie papers, 1892-1905. (Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division). WorldCat record id: 42199158

Alexander Oswald Brodie was born in Edwards, New York in 1849 to Joseph and Margaret Brodie. Alexander Brodie attended a boarding high school in Canton, New York until his appointment to the United States Military Academy in 1866. He graduated from West Point in 1870 and became a second lieutenant in the First Cavalry and was assigned to Arizona later that year. Brodie participated in Indian campaigns with General Crook and was stationed at Fort Apache until 1873. In 1874, he transferred to Fort Walla Walla, Washington and fought in the Nez Perce War. Brodie had risen to first lieutenant when he resigned his commission in 1877 following the deaths of his wife and daughter after childbirth.

Brodie worked as a cattleman and miner before re-enlisting in the cavalry in 1883. Once more he was sent to Arizona and stayed in the territory after his discharge in 1884. In 1891, Brodie became Colonel of the First Regiment National Guard of Arizona but he resigned in 1892. He served as Yavapai County Recorder from 1892 to 1895. When the Spanish American War appeared imminent in 1898, Brodie telegraphed President William McKinley and Governor Myron McCord and asked to raise a volunteer cavalry regiment. When war was declared, Brodie's regiment became the First Volunteer Cavalry which was commonly known as the "Rough Riders." Future president Teddy Roosevelt served as the regiment's lieutenant colonel and Brodie was a regimental officer. At the battle of Las Guasimas in Cuba, a bullet shattered Brodie's right wrist but he returned to service within two months.

After the war ended, Brodie returned to Arizona and worked as a mining engineer once more. In 1902, President Roosevelt appointed Brodie to the governorship. During his administration, he pursued statehood, federally assisted irrigation projects, better schools for Indian children, and new tax and incorporation laws. On February 14, 1905, Brodie resigned and returned to the United States Army as a major. He retired from the Army in 1913 and moved to Haddonfield, New Jersey. Brodie died on May 10, 1918 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Brodie married his second wife, Mary Louise Hanlon, on December 15, 1892 and they had two sons; both were named after their father. Their first son died in 1896 and the second was born in 1898 and was commonly known as "Sandy."

From the guide to the MG 132, Alexander O. Brodie, Correspondence, 1893-1902, (Arizona State Archives)

Alexander Oswald Brodie was born in Edwards, New York in 1849 to Joseph and Margaret Brodie. Alexander Brodie attended a boarding high school in Canton, New York until his appointment to the United States Military Academy in 1866. He graduated from West Point in 1870 and became a second lieutenant in the First Cavalry and was assigned to Arizona later that year. Brodie participated in Indian campaigns with General Crook and was stationed at Fort Apache until 1873. In 1874, he transferred to Fort Walla Walla, Washington and fought in the Nez Perce War. Brodie had risen to first lieutenant when he resigned his commission in 1877 following the deaths of his wife and daughter after childbirth.

Brodie worked as a cattleman and miner before re-enlisting in the cavalry in 1883. Once more he was sent to Arizona and stayed in the territory after his discharge in 1884. In 1891, Brodie became Colonel of the First Regiment National Guard of Arizona but he resigned in 1892. He served as Yavapai County Recorder from 1892 to 1895. When the Spanish American War appeared imminent in 1898, Brodie telegraphed President William McKinley and Governor Myron McCord and asked to raise a volunteer cavalry regiment. When war was declared, Brodie's regiment became the First Volunteer Cavalry which was commonly known as the "Rough Riders". Future president Teddy Roosevelt served as the regiment's lieutenant colonel and Brodie was a regimental officer. At the battle of Las Guasimas in Cuba, a bullet shattered Brodie's right wrist but he returned to service within two months.

After the war ended, Brodie returned to Arizona and worked as a mining engineer once more. In 1902, President Roosevelt appointed Brodie to the governorship. During his administration, he pursued statehood, federally assisted irrigation projects, better schools for Indian children, and new tax and incorporation laws. On February 14, 1905, Brodie resigned and returned to the United States Army as a major. He retired from the Army in 1913 and moved to Haddonfield, New Jersey. Brodie died on May 10, 1918 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Brodie married his second wife, Mary Louise Hanlon, on December 15, 1892 and they had two sons; both were named after their father. Their first son died in 1896 and the second was born in 1898 and was commonly known as "Sandy".

From the guide to the Governor's Office, Alexander O. Brodie, RG 1 SG 5, 1902-1904, (Arizona State Archives)

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6tb327t
Ark ID:
w6tb327t
SNAC ID:
62256099

Subjects:

  • Governor
  • Arizona, Governor's Office

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Arizona (as recorded)