Miller, Henry, 1891-1980.

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1891-12-26
Death 1980-06-07
Americans
English, French

Biographical notes:

Novelist.

From the description of Papers, 1952-1957. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155457225

Henry Miller (1891-1980) was an American author. He was known for his experimental, surrealist novels, such as Tropic of Cancer, which mixed fiction and autobiography. His writing was controversial for its graphic depictions of sexuality, leading to a 1964 obscenity trial in the United States, Grove Press, Inc. v. Gerstein.

From the guide to the Henry Miller Letter, undated, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 - June 7, 1980), was an American writer and painter. He is known for breaking with existing literary forms and developing a new sort of "novel" that is a mixture of novel, autobiography, social criticism, philosophical reflection, surrealist free association, and mysticism, one that is distinctly always about and expressive of the real-life Henry Miller and yet is also fictional. His most characteristic works of this kind are Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, and Black Spring. He also wrote travel memoirs and essays of literary criticism and analysis. His daughter, Valentine Miller lives today on the Monterey Peninsula.

From the description of Valentine Miller collection of Henry Miller letters, 1952-1964. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 311868387

From the description of Henry Miller sound recording, 1945. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 701732065

Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 - June 7, 1980), was an American writer and painter. He is known for breaking with existing literary forms and developing a new sort of "novel" that is a mixture of novel, autobiography, social criticism, philosophical reflection, surrealist free association, and mysticism, one that is distinctly always about and expressive of the real-life Henry Miller and yet is also fictional. His most characteristic works of this kind are Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, and Black Spring. He also wrote travel memoirs and essays of literary criticism and analysis.

From the description of Elmer Gertz collection of Henry Miller, 1962-1975. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 263031248

From the description of The Noel Riley Fitch collection of Henry Miller, 1987-1993. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 262833495

From the description of Henry Miller collection, 1965-1978. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 262699178

From the description of Robert Fink collection of Henry Miller, 1939-1958. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 298241759

Henry Miller (1891-1980) was born in New York and resided in France and other European cities. Miller was a writer noted for his candid treatment of sex and his espousal of the "natural man". His "Tropic of Cancer" (1934) and "Tropic of Capricorn" (1939) were banned as obscene in the United States until 1961. Other books include the trilogy "The Rosy Crucifixion". Miller was a major influence on the "Beat Generation" of writers.

From the description of Henry Miller collection. [1937-1963]. (University of Victoria Libraries). WorldCat record id: 651603411

Henry Valentine Miller was born December 26, 1891 in Manhattan to Heinrich Miller and Louise Nieting. A year later, the family moved to Brooklyn where Miller spent the majority of his childhood and adolescence. After graduating from high school in 1909, Miller attended the City College of New York for two months before leaving school. Throughout his twenties, Miller had a series of odd jobs, and in 1913 he left New York and traveled west, working briefly in California before he returned home to work in his father's tailor shop. In 1917 Miller married Beatrice Sylvan Wickens, and their first daughter, Barbara, was born two years later. At this time, Miller started working for Western Union Telegraph company where he made his first serious attempts at writing. Miller met June Edith Smith (June Mansfield) at a dance hall in 1923, and they were married in 1924 following a divorce from his first wife. At this time, Miller quit his job at Western Union in order to devote his time to writing, a decision that left him in poverty for much of this period. Miller and June traveled to Europe in 1928. Miller returned to Europe again in 1930 with the intention of living there permanently. He settled in Paris, where he would spend the majority of the next ten years, and immediately began writing Tropic of Cancer. This became his first published book in 1934. In Paris, Miller became involved in the literary and artistic scene, befriending writers and artists such as Alfred Perlès, Michael Frankel, Abraham Rattner, Hans Reichel, and Lawrence Durrell. Miller met Anaïs Nin in 1931, and both a romantic relationship and a lasting literary friendship developed. Miller was divorced from his second wife, June, in 1934. At the invitation of his friend Lawrence Durrell, Miller traveled to Greece in 1939, a trip that inspired his famous work, The Colossus of Maroussi. He was forced to return to the United States in 1940 as a result of the war in Europe. After his return, Miller lived in Los Angeles. During these years, Miller had several watercolor exhibitions in Los Angeles and London and prepared more of his writings for publication. In 1944, Miller married Janina Lepska, a graduate student who he had met on a trip to New York, and the Millers moved to Big Sur that same year. Daughter Valentine was born in 1945, and son Tony was born in 1948. Miller separated from Lepska in 1951. In 1953, Miller and Eve McClure toured Europe together; on their return, Miller and Eve were married. They divorced in 1960. In 1961 Tropic of Cancer was published for the first time in the United States, and censorship battles began. It wasn't until 1964 that the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the book was not pornographic. The stateside publication of Tropic of Cancer made Miller famous in the United States, and a steady stream of fans began to visit and write to him at his home in Big Sur. In an attempt to flee the constant attention, Miller moved to Pacific Palisades in 1962 where he lived for the remainder of his life. In 1966, Miller met Hiroko "Hoki" Tokuda, a Japanese nightclub singer. They were married that same year, but Hoki left Miller in 1977. Miller continued to write, but poor eyesight and health problems decreased the frequency. He did, however, continue to produce watercolors until his death. Miller died at the age of 88 on June 7, 1980.

From the description of Papers, 1896-1984, 1930-1980. (University of California, Los Angeles). WorldCat record id: 40102641

Henry Miller was an American novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and literary and social critic.

From the description of Henry Miller collection of papers, [1932]-1978. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122485097

From the guide to the Henry Miller collection of papers, 1932]-1978, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 - June 7, 1980) was an American novelist and painter. His novels include Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn and Black Spring . He also wrote travel memoirs and essays of literary criticism and analysis. During the writing of his novels in the 1930s, Miller lived in Paris. His work was banned in the United States on the grounds of obscenity, but would be smuggled into the country to create his reputation as an underground writer. In 1940, he returned to the United States, settling in Big Sur, California. The publication of Tropic of Cancer in the United States in 1961 led to a series of obscenity trials that tested American laws on pornography.

From the guide to the Henry Miller papers, 1939-1966, (Ohio University)

Writer.

From the description of Henry Miller manuscripts, 1950-1957 (Johns Hopkins University). WorldCat record id: 318643806

Henry Miller was a larger-than-life American writer. After unproductive early years, he travelled to Paris in 1930, where his peculiar and distinctive style of semi-autobiographical prose began to take shape. Explicit passages in his work caused an uproar, leading to a landmark Supreme Court case in the 1960s. Aside from this notoriety, and in spite of his wildly uneven body of work, Henry Miller remains an important 20th century novelist, conveying an aimless but intense sense of artistic self-expression.

From the description of Henry Miller letter and manuscripts, 1965-1979. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 54484348

Henry Miller was an American author. Among his famous works are Tropic of Cancer, Black Spring and Tropic of Capricorn.

From the description of Letter from Henry Miller to Jesse L. Greenstein. 1943, Dec. 3. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 226351725

Henry Miller was a writer. He died in 1980.

From the description of Miscellaneous manuscripts, 1938, n.d. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 190872478

American author.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Pacific Palisades, Ca., to John Rewald, 1968 Jan. 5. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270871534

From the description of Letter, 1947 March 22 Big Sur, Ca., to Jim Hiner [Minneapolis?] [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647832061

From the description of Photoprint [manuscript], 1940 September 10. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647812054

From the description of Papers of Henry Miller [manuscript], 1943-1946. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647855121

From the description of Correspondence with William H. Runge [manuscript], 1964-1966. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647874262

Author.

From the description of Letters, 1939-1941. (Indiana University). WorldCat record id: 47721623

From the description of Letters, 1948-1976. (Indiana University). WorldCat record id: 39287804

From the description of Papers, 1951-1952, 1955. (Indiana University). WorldCat record id: 182631335

From the description of Opus pistorum : corrected typescript, circa 1941? (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71132402

Henry Miller (1891-1980) was an American writer noted for his candid treatment of sex. His Tropic of Cancer (1934) and Tropic of Capricorn (1939) were banned as obscene in the United States until 1961. Popular throughout Europe and the United States, Miller was influential on the "Beat Generation" of writers. Miller was also an artist well-known for his watercolor paintings.

From the description of Henry Miller papers, 1944-1989. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 671537409

From the guide to the Henry Miller papers, 1944-1989., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

American author Henry Miller (1891–1980) was raised by German-American parents in Brooklyn. Before becoming a writer, Miller traveled throughout the western United States working at odd jobs and then returned to New York to work at his father’s tailor shop. After working for Western Telegraph Company for four years, Miller left for France in 1930 and lived there for nine years. During this period, he published Tropic of Cancer (1934), Tropic of Capricorn (1939), and Black Spring (1936). In 1940, Miller returned to the United States, traveled extensively, continued to write, and eventually settled in Big Sur, California. Miller’s early works were unavailable in America until the 1960s because they contained explicit sexual passages that were deemed obscene.

Perkins, George and Barbara Perkins and Phillip Leininger. Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia of American Literature . New York: Harper Collins, 1991.

From the guide to the Collection of Henry Miller's, Reflections on the Life of Mishima, documents, 1971–1973, 1971, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Biography

Henry Valentine Miller was born December 26, 1891 in Manhattan to Heinrich Miller and Louise Nieting. A year later, the family moved to Brooklyn where Miller spent the majority of his childhood and adolescence. After graduating from high school in 1909, Miller attended the City College of New York for two months before leaving school. Throughout his twenties, Miller had a series of odd jobs, and in 1913 he left New York and traveled west, working briefly in California before he returned home to work in his father's tailor shop. In 1917 Miller married Beatrice Sylvan Wickens, and their first daughter, Barbara, was born two years later. At this time, Miller started working for Western Union Telegraph company where he made his first serious attempts at writing. Miller met June Edith Smith (June Mansfield) at a dance hall in 1923, and they were married in 1924 following a divorce from his first wife. At this time, Miller quit his job at Western Union in order to devote his time to writing, a decision that left him in poverty for much of this period. Miller and June traveled to Europe in 1928. Miller returned to Europe again in 1930 with the intention of living there permanently. He settled in Paris, where he would spend the majority of the next ten years, and immediately began writing Tropic of Cancer . This became his first published book in 1934. In Paris, Miller became involved in the literary and artistic scene, befriending writers and artists such as Alfred Perle's, Michael Frankel, Abraham Rattner, Hans Reichel, and Lawrence Durrell. Miller met Anaïs Nin in 1931, and both a romantic relationship and a lasting literary friendship developed. Miller was divorced from his second wife, June, in 1934. At the invitation of his friend Lawrence Durrell, Miller traveled to Greece in 1939, a trip that inspired his famous work, The Colossus of Maroussi . He was forced to return to the United States in 1940 as a result of the war in Europe. After his return, Miller lived in Los Angeles. During these years, Miller had several watercolor exhibitions in Los Angeles and London and prepared more of his writings for publication. In 1944, Miller married Janina Lepska, a graduate student who he had met on a trip to New York, and the Millers moved to Big Sur that same year. Daughter Valentine was born in 1945, and son Tony was born in 1948. Miller separated from Lepska in 1951. In 1953, Miller and Eve McClure toured Europe together; on their return, Miller and Eve were married. They divorced in 1960. In 1961 Tropic of Cancer was published for the first time in the United States, and censorship battles began. It wasn't until 1964 that the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the book was not pornographic. The stateside publication of Tropic of Cancer made Miller famous in the United States, and a steady stream of fans began to visit and write to him at his home in Big Sur. In an attempt to flee the constant attention, Miller moved to Pacific Palisades in 1962 where he lived for the remainder of his life. In 1966, Miller met Hiroko "Hoki" Tokuda, a Japanese nightclub singer. They were married that same year, but Hoki left Miller in 1977. Miller continued to write, but poor eyesight and health problems decreased the frequency. He did, however, continue to produce watercolors until his death. Miller died at the age of 88 on June 7, 1980.

From the guide to the Henry Miller Papers, 1896-1984, 1930-1980, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

Biography

Henry Valentine Miller was born on December 26, 1891 in New York City. He attended the College of the City of New York, 1909 and worked for various employers from 1909-27. In 1930 Miller went to Europe and lived in Paris until 1939. During this time he wrote Tropic of Cancer (1934), Black Spring (1936), and Tropic of Capricorn (1939). Miller was also a painter and his water colors were exhibited internationally. He died on June 7, 1980, in Pacific Palisades, California. E.E. Schmidt was a client of Miller's; no further information is available about him.

From the guide to the Henry Miller letters to E.E. Scmidt and other material, 1949-1950, (University of California, Irvine. Library. Special Collections and Archives.)

Novelist and painter Henry Miller (1891-1980) was the author of numerous twentieth-century works. His Tropic of Cancer, often censored, became the focus of an obsenity trial heard before the Supreme Court in 1964.

Bern Porter (1911-2004) was author of Henry Miller Miscellanea (1945); The Happy Rock; a Book about Henry Miller (1945); H.L. Mencken : a Bibliography (1957). Porter also gained a reputation as a philosopher and scientist. He worked on the Manhattan Project and the Saturn V rocket, work that brought him into contact with Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Werner von Braun. He left the Manhattan Project immediately following the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima in 1945; as noted by Alex Irvine (2005), Porter preferred to devote time to "do something constructive with what limited talents and funds I had."

From the guide to the Henry Miller letter to Bern Porter (MS 138), August 1944, (University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.)

Henry Valentine Miller was born on December 26, 1891 in New York City.

He attended the College of the City of New York, 1909 and worked for various employers from 1909-27. In 1930 Miller went to Europe and lived in Paris until 1939. During this time he wrote Tropic of Cancer (1934), Black Spring (1936), and Tropic of Capricorn (1939). Miller was also a painter and his water colors were exhibited internationally. He died on June 7, 1980, in Pacific Palisades, California. E.E. Schmidt was a client of Miller's; no further information is available about him.

From the description of Henry Miller letters to E.E. Schmidt and other material, 1949-1950. (University of California, Irvine). WorldCat record id: 56829194

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Places:

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