Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1902-02-01
Death 1967-05-22
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Poet, author, playwright, songwriter.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes collection, [microform], 1926-1967, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

From the description of Langston Hughes collection, 1926-1967. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 144652168

Langson Hughes: African-American poet and writer, author of Weary Blue (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works.

From the description of Uncle Tom: [poem, 7 drafts] : autograph manuscript, 1941. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122551822

Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902 in Joplin, Missouri to Caroline Leary Hughes. From 1903 to 1915, Hughes lived in Lawrence, Kansas with his grandmother, Mary Langston; in 1915 he joined his mother in Illinois. The family moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where Hughes graduated high school. He entered New York's Columbia University in 1921, but only attended for a year. During his time at Columbia Hughes discovered Harlem, where he became an influential part of the Harlem Renaissance. In 1926 he published his first book of poetry, The Weary Blues. Over the course of his life, Hughes created a wide range of works including novels, short stories, children's books, scripts, translations, and, of course, poetry. Following abdominal surgery, Langston Hughes died May 22, 1967.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes Photograph, estimated 1945, (University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library Kansas Collection)

Langston Hughes, African American poet and writer, author of Weary Blues (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works.

From the description of Langston Hughes: [autobiographical sketch], 1941. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122332620

Poet, novelist, short story writer, playwright, lyricist, and author of juvenile books, Langston Hughes was one of the most prolific African-American writers of the 20th century. Born in Joplin, Missouri, Hughes came to New York in the 1920s and joined other writers and artists in creating what would become known as the Harlem Renaissance.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes collection, 1929-1967, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, playwrights.

From the description of Mule bone : a comedy of Negro life in three acts: typescript, 1991. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122682825

(James) Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902-May 22, 1967), an African-American writer, poet, playwright and columnist made influential contributions in his life and work during the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920's. In 1925 Hughes won first prize in the poetry section of the 1925 Opportunity magazine literary contest, which launched his literary career. His first volume of poetry appeared in 1926. In 1942, he became a columnist for the African American newspaper, the Chicago Defender. Hughes used the rhythms of African American music, specifically jazz and blues in writing his poetry; thus, he was able to experiment with rhythmic free verse. The primary source of his writing was for the theater. His drama titled "Mulatto" became the longest running play on Broadway until the introduction of "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1958 by Lorraine Hansberry. Langston Hughes died in 1967 after having had abdominal surgery.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes Letters, 1946 -1965, (University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries. Special Collections Dept.)

Langston Hughes, well-known African-American author of Weary Blues (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works. Loren Miller was an African-American judge, attorney, and Civil Rights activist. He was a reporter for the California News and publisher of the California Eagle. Hughes and Miller were good friends. Miller served as legal counsel for Hughes on several occassions.

From the description of Papers of Langston Hughes, 1910-1976, (bulk 1932-1934). (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 77936924

Notable African-American author and poet known for his themes of African-American life and culture during the 1920's-1960's; also known for his contributions to the Harlem Renaissance movement in the 1920's.

From the description of Letter, signed : New York, NY, to Walter Goldwater (New York, NY), 5 April 1960. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 62718975

African American writer, especially of poems.

From the description of Poems, [ca. 1940-1954]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 46716053

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), African American poet, playwright, and novelist, born in Joplin, Missouri.

From the description of Langston Hughes collection, 1932-1969. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 220966919

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), African American poet, playwright, and lecturer.

From the description of Letters to Olive Lindsey Wakefield, 1945-1955. (Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System). WorldCat record id: 38476760

African American writer known especially for his poetry and for his use of Black cultural references, and Black musical rythms in his writing.

From the description of Letters, 1966. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 78439311

Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902 in Joplin, Missouri to Caroline Leary Hughes. From 1903 to 1915, Hughes lived in Lawrence, Kansas with his grandmother, Mary Langston; in 1915 he joined his mother in Illinois. The family then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where Hughes graduated high school. He then entered New York's Columbia University in 1921, but only attended for a year. During his time at Columbia Hughes discovered Harlem, where he became an influential part of the Harlem Renaissance. In 1926 he published his first book of poetry, The Weary Blues. Over the course of his life, Hughes created a wide range of works including novels, short stories, children's books, scripts, translations, and, of course, poetry. Following abdominal surgery, Langston Hughes died May 22, 1967.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes literary works collection, 1926-1967, (University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library Kansas Collection)

From the guide to the Langston Hughes papers, 1931-1967, (University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library Kansas Collection)

African American author and poet; b. James Langston Hughes.

From the description of James Langston Hughes papers, 1928-1966. (Fisk University). WorldCat record id: 70972579

Author.

From the description of Papers of Langston Hughes, 1921-1941. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79455169

African American writer.

From the description of Papers of Langston Hughes [manuscript], 1925-1982. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647825672

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), novelist and poet.

From the description of Langston Hughes collection, 1924-1969. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702171709

From the description of Langston Hughes collection, 1924-1969. (Yale University). WorldCat record id: 60366712

Langston Hughes, African-American poet and writer, author of Weary Blues (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works.

From the description of Letter to Beulah May, 1883-, 1941. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122584919

Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902 in Joplin, Missouri to Caroline Leary Hughes. From 1903 to 1915, Hughes lived in Lawrence, Kansas with his grandmother, Mary Langston; during that time, he briefly lived with his mother in Topeka, Kansas, circa 1908-1909 (he recalled this experience in his autobiography The Big Sea ). Following his grandmother's death in 1915 Hughes joined his mother in Illinois. The family then moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where Hughes graduated high school. He then entered New York's Columbia University in 1921, but only attended for a year. During his time at Columbia Hughes discovered Harlem, where he became an influential part of the Harlem Renaissance. In 1926 he published his first book of poetry, The Weary Blues . Over the course of his life, Hughes created a wide range of works including novels, short stories, children's books, scripts, translations, and, of course, poetry. Following abdominal surgery, Langston Hughes died May 22, 1967.

From the guide to the Langston Hughes literary ephemera, 1963, (University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library Kansas Collection)

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was a poet, playwright, and journalist closely associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes attended Central High School in Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for the school newspaper and yearbook.

From the description of Langston Hughes writings on Central High School centennial, 1946 April 23-May 25. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 780306511

African American poet and playwright.

From the description of Seven moments of love : an un-sonnet sequence in blues : typescript, 1939. (New York University, Group Batchload). WorldCat record id: 58758172

Langson Hughes: African-American poet, author of Weary Blues (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works.

From the description of Declaration: [poem, 6 drafts] : authograph manuscript, 1939. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122446257

Langston Hughes born Feb. 1, 1902 in Joplin, Mo., died May 22, 1967 in New York, N.Y. Hughes was an African-American writer of poetry, plays and short stories.

From the description of Dear lovely death : typescript, 1931 / Langston Hughes. (University of California, Berkeley). WorldCat record id: 52394302

A biographical timeline is provided in the Langston Hughes Papers (JWJ MSS 26).

From the guide to the Langston Hughes collection, 1924-1969, (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), poet, columnist, and novelist.

From the description of Langston Hughes papers, 1862-1980. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702135914

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), African American poet, playwright, and novelist, born in Joplin, Missouri. Thyra J. Edwards (1897-1953) [later Gitlin], African American social worker, teacher and activist, lived in Chicago, Illinois during the 1930s and 1940s. She edited THE PEOPLE'S VOICE and the NEGRO DIGEST, to which Hughes frequently contributed.

From the description of Thyra Edwards' collection of Langston Hughes material, 1935-1941 (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 610452673

Poet and dramatist.

From the description of Printed material, 1932-1967 and undated. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 191102113

Langston Hughes was an African-American poet, novelist, short story writer, playwright, song lyricist, radio writer, translator, author of juvenile books, and lecturer. Hughes was first recognized as an important literary figure during the 1920s, a period known as the "Harlem Renaissance" because of the number of emerging black writers.

From the description of Langston Hughes letters, 1936-1966. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 48822638

From the description of Langston Hughes letters, 1936-1966. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 81646003

Langston Hughes was a 20th century African American author, playwright, and poet best known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance.

From the description of Langston Hughes letters, 1946-1965. (Denver Public Library). WorldCat record id: 181085007

Langston Hughes (1902-1967), African-American poet, author of Weary Blues (1926), The Big Sea (1940), and other works.

From the description of Big Sur: [poem] / Langston Hughes, 1902-1967, 1941. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122644160

Langston Hughes was a well-known African-American poet, novelist, short story writer, playwright, song lyricist, radio writer, translator, author of juvenile books, and lecturer. He attended Columbia University (1921-1922) and Lincoln University, A.B. (1929). In addition to his writing he was Madrid correspondent for the Baltimore Afro-American, 1937; visiting professor in creative writing, Atlanta University, 1947; poet in residence, Laboratory School, University of Chicago, 1949.

(Source: Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2003.)

From the guide to the Langston Hughes Collection, ca 1937, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

Poet, novelist, short story writer, playwright, lyricist, and author of juvenile books, Langston Hughes was one of the most prolific African-American writers of the 20th century.

Born in Joplin, Missouri, Hughes came to New York in the 1920s and joined other writers and artists in creating what would become known as the Harlem Renaissance.

From the description of Langston Hughes collection, 1929-1967. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122626236

Adele M. Glasgow was a researcher for and secretary to Langston Hughes in the 1950s and 1960s.

Langston Hughes, poet and writer, 1902-1967.

From the description of Adele M. Glasgow papers relating to Langston Hughes, 1962-1984. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79096074

Adele M. Glasgow was a researcher for and secretary to Langston Hughes in the 1950s and 1960s.

Langston Hughes, poet and writer, 1902-1967.

From the description of Adele M. Glasgow papers relating to Langston Hughes, 1962-1984. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702150305

The Life of Langston Hughes has been written about in a wide range of biographies, which are available at many libraries. What follows is a brief timeline of important dates in his life.

1902: James Langston Hughes born February 1, in Joplin, Missouri, to Carrie Langston Hughes and James Nathaniel Hughes.

1902-1914: Lived in Mexico, Missouri, and Kansas for short periods with his mother and father, then, after they separated, with his grandmother in Lawrence, Kansas.

1914: Moved from Lawrence to join his mother and stepfather in Lincoln, Illinois.

1916: Elected class poet for grammar school graduation at Lincoln. Moved from Lincoln to Cleveland, Ohio.

1920: Chosen editor of Central High School Yearbook, Cleveland. Graduated from Central High School. Spent the year after graduation in Mexico with his father.

1921: Published juvenile poetry in The Brownie's Book. "A Negro Speaks of Rivers" published in The Crisis. Entered Columbia University in New York.

1922: Left Columbia to take assorted jobs in New York area.

1923-24: Employed as cook's helper on tramp steamer to Africa, Holland, and Europe. Employed as cook in Paris night club; stranded as a beachcomber in Genoa. Returned from Europe to live with his mother in Washington, D.C.

1925: Lived in Washington, D.C. Won first prize for poetry in Opportunity contest. Won second prize for essay and third prize for poetry in The Crisis contest. Carl Van Vechten introduced his poetry to Alfred Knopf.

1926: Entered Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. Weary Blues published. Fire published. Won first prize in Witter Bynner Undergraduate Poetry Contest.

1927: Fine Clothes to the Jew published. Traveled in South.

1929: Graduated from Lincoln University.

1930: Not Without Laughter published. Won Harmon award for literature.

1931: Dear Lovely Death and The Negro Mother published. Traveled to Haiti and Cuba. Conducted poetry reading tour in the South and West.

1932: The Dream Keeper, Scottsboro Limited, and Popo and Fifina published.

1933: Returned to California from Russia by way of Japan. Spent year writing at Carmel by the Sea.

1934: Ways of White Folks published. Death of father in Mexico.

1935: Received Guggenheim Fellowship. Lived and worked in Mexico.

1937: Traveled to Spain as correspondent for Baltimore Afro- American . Death of mother.

1938: A New Song published. Founded Harlem Suitcase Theatre.

1939: Founded The New Negro Theater in Los Angeles.

1940: The Big Sea published.

1941: Received Rosenwald Fellowship.

1942: Shakespeare in Harlem published. Founded Skyloft P1ayers in Chicago.

1943: Freedom's Plow and Jim Crow's Last Stand published. Began Chicago Defender columns. Granted Hon. Litt. D. from Lincoln University.

1946: Elected to membership in National Institute of Arts and Letters.

1947: Fields of Wonder and translation of Jacques Roumain's Masters of the Dew published. Appointed Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Atlanta University.

1948: Translation of Nicolas Guillen's Cuba Libre published.

1949: Appointed Poet in Residence at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. Troubled Island presented in New York.

1950: Simple Speaks His Mind and The Poetry of the Negro published. The Barrier presented in New York.

1951: Montage on a Dream Deferred and translation of Garcia Lorca's Romancero Gitano published.

1952: Laughing to Keep From Crying and First Book of Negroes published.

1953: Received Ainsfeld-Wolfe Award (Best book of year on race relations). Simple Takes a Wife published.

1954: Famous American Negroes and First Book of Rhythms published.

1955: Sweet Flypaper of Life, Famous Negro Music Makers, and First Book of Jazz published.

1956: I Wonder As I Wander, A Pictorial History of the Negro In America, and The First Book of the West Indies, published.

1957: Simple Stakes a Claim and Selected Poems of Gabriela Mistral published. Simply Heavenly presented on Broadway.

1958: Famous Negro Heroes of America and The Book of Negro Folklore published.

1959: Selected Poems and Tambourines to Glory published.

1960: Received Spingarn Medal. African Treasury and The First Book of Africa published.

1961: Ask Your Mama and The Best of Simple published. Black Nativity presented in New York.

1962: Fight for Freedom published. Attended literary conference in Uganda and Nigeria. Began New York Post columns.

1963: Something in Common and Other Stories . Poems from Black Africa . Tambourines to Glory (play based on novel) presented on Broadway. Received Doctor of Letters degree from Howard University.

1964: New Negro Poets : U.S.A. edited. Jerico-Jim Crow presented in New York. Helped prepare BBC's The Negro in America series. Granted Hon. Litt. D. from Western Reserve.

1965: Simple's Uncle Sam published. The Prodigal Son presented in New York. Wrote script for WCBS-TV's Easter program. "It's a Mighty World". Lectured in America Houses in Europe for United States Information Agency.

1966: La Poesie Negro-Americaine, and The Book of Negro Humor edited.

1967: The Best Short Stories by Negro Writers, edited. The Panther and the Lash, Black Magic: A Pictorial History of the Negro in American Entertainment, with Milton Meltzer. Hughes died May 22, 1967.

[from Donald C. Dickinson's A Bio-Bibliography of Langston Hughes and James A. Emanuel's Langston Hughes ]

From the guide to the Langston Hughes papers, 1862-1980, (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

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Subjects:

  • African Americans--Intellectual life
  • Poets, American--20th century
  • Manuscripts, American
  • Education--African Americans--20th century
  • African Americans--Civil rights
  • Miscegenation
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  • Wolle, Francis, 1889-1977--Correspondence
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  • City and town life--Drama
  • Poetry--Black authors
  • Authors, Afro--Cuban
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  • Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967--Correspondence
  • Harlem Renaissance
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  • American theater--20th century

Occupations:

  • African American authors
  • Poets
  • Lyricists
  • Authors
  • African American poets

Places:

  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • Virginia--Louisa County (as recorded)
  • Cleveland (Ohio) (as recorded)
  • Harlem (New York, N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • California--San Francisco (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • Ohio--Cleveland (as recorded)
  • Haiti (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Chapel Hill (N.C.) (as recorded)
  • New York (New York) (as recorded)
  • Africa (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • Louisa County (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)