Toombs, Robert Augustus, 1810-1885

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1810-07-02
Death 1885-12-15

Biographical notes:

Robert Toombs (1810-1885), lawyer, U.S. Senator (1844-1861), Confederate General, married Julia Ann DuBois, resided in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Robert Toombs papers, 1837-1880 (bulk 1850-1866). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38477000

Robert Toombs (1810-1885) lawyer, U.S. Senator (1844-1861), Confederate General, married Julia Ann DuBois, resided in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Letters to Julia Ann DuBois Toombs, 1850-1867. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38477227

Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885), U.S. Senator and Congressman, Confederate Secretary of State, and Confederate General.

From the description of Letter to John C. Breckinridge, 1867 Apr. 30. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38476606

Congressman and senator from Georgia, Confederate secretary of state.

From the description of ALS : Washington, Georgia, to John Pettit, Lafayette, Ind., 1858 Sept. 2. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122633617

Robert Augustus Toombs served as Secretary of State (1861) of the Confederate States of America, and as a C.S.A. general during the Civil War.

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs letter, 1857 Jan. 3. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 269035979

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs letter, 1848. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 269037511

Robert Toombs (1810-1885), lawyer and politician, born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Letter to General Gustavus W. Smith, 1865 Mar. 25. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38476952

"Robert Toombs, one of the most ardent secessionists in the U.S. Senate, helped to lead Georgia out of the Union on the eve of the Civil War. This was surprising; although Toombs was a slaveholding planter, he had dedicated the majority of his political career to preserving the Union. Spanning almost four decades, his career in Georgia politics began in the state legislature, and he later ventured into national affairs as a U.S. congressman and senator. During the early months of the Civil War he became secretary of state for the Confederacy. He concluded his political leadership as one of the major architects of the state Constitution of 1877." - "Robert Toombs." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved September 4, 2008)

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs autograph, 1881. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 441886934

From the description of Robert Toombs letter, 1870 April 30. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 374014490

U.S. senator and representative from Georgia and Confederate secretary of state and army officer.

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs papers, 1834-1862. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70980633

Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885), lawyer and politician, born in Wilkes County, Georgia.

From the description of Letter to Capt. A.J. Mays, 1871 Mar. 27. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38478052

Robert Toombs, one of the most ardent secessionists in the U.S. Senate, helped to lead Georgia out of the Union on the eve of the Civil War. This was surprising; although Toombs was a slaveholding planter, he had dedicated the majority of his political career to preserving the Union. Spanning almost four decades, his career in Georgia politics began in the state legislature, and he later ventured into national affairs as a U.S. congressman and senator. During the early months of the Civil War he became secretary of state for the Confederacy. He concluded his political leadership as one of the major architects of the state Constitution of 1877. Toombs's statesmanship, personality, and unyielding convictions made him one of Georgia's most influential politicians of the nineteenth century. Toombs County, in southeast Georgia, is named in his honor. Robert Toombs (1810-1885) - New Georgia Encyclopedia http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved March 24, 2009).

From the description of Robert Toombs letters, 1855-1872. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 373897807

Lawyer, U.S. congressman, 1845-1853, U.S. senator, 1853-1861, and member of the first Confederate Congress; of Wilkes County, Ga.

From the description of Correspondence, 1846-1881. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 20400303

Lawyer, of Wilkes County, Ga.; Secretary of State, Confederate States of America; delegate, of Georgia Constitutional Convention, 1877; member of U.S. Senate, 1853-1861; member of U.S. House, 1845-1853; member of Georgia House, 1837-1843; Brig. Gen., Confederate States Army; Adjutant and Inspector-Genreral of Georgia Militia, 1864; graduate of Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., 1828.

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs papers, 1861. (University of South Carolina). WorldCat record id: 42576031

Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885) was born in Wilkes County, Georgia, the son of a Revolutionary War major. He studied at the University of Georgia, but completed his degree at the University of Schenectady, New York. He received his law degree from the University of Georgia and was admitted to the bar in 1830. That same year, Toombs married Julia DuBose. He was elected to the Georgia legislature in 1837 and to Congress in 1844. He served as Secretary of State of the Confederate States of America; in 1861 he accepted a military commission and commanded a Georgia brigade. A bullet shattered his left hand while his troops were defending a bridge at the battle of Antietam.

From the description of Robert Augustus Toombs letters, petitions, and writs, 1834-1871. (Georgia Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 144570319

"Robert Toombs, one of the most ardent secessionists in the U.S. Senate, helped to lead Georgia out of the Union on the eve of the Civil War. This was surprising; although Toombs was a slaveholding planter, he had dedicated the majority of his political career to preserving the Union. Spanning almost four decades, his career in Georgia politics began in the state legislature, and he later ventured into national affairs as a U.S. congressman and senator. During the early months of the Civil War he became secretary of state for the Confederacy. He concluded his political leadership as one of the major architects of the state Constitution of 1877." - "Robert Toombs." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved September 4, 2008)

"Known as the "Macaulay of the South," Charles C. Jones Jr. was the foremost Georgia historian of the nineteenth century. Also a noted autograph and manuscript collector and an accomplished amateur archaeologist, Jones in later years became a prominent memorialist of the Lost Cause and critic of the New South." - "Charles C. Jones Jr." New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org (Retrieved August 21, 2008)

From the description of Robert Toombs letter, 1869 December 1. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 432661051

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Subjects:

  • American Confederate voluntary exiles
  • Reconstruction
  • Atlanta Campaign, 1864
  • Politicians--Autographs
  • Lawyers--Autographs
  • Judges--Correspondence
  • Historians--Correspondence
  • Cabinet officers--Autographs
  • Legislators--Correspondence
  • Political parties
  • Plantation owners--19th century--Correspondence
  • Courts--History--19th century--Sources
  • Legislators--19th century--Correspondence
  • Cabinet officers
  • Civil war
  • Legislators
  • Agriculture
  • Antietam, Battle of, Md., 1862
  • Judges--Election
  • Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
  • Judges--Selection and appointment
  • Cabinet officers--Correspondence
  • Indians of North America--Government relations
  • Lawyers--Correspondence
  • Real estate investment--19th century
  • Slavery
  • Presidents--Election--1856
  • Diplomatic and consular service
  • General
  • Politicians--Correspondence
  • Real estate business--Problems, exercises, etc
  • Plantation owners--Autographs
  • Plantation owners--Correspondence
  • Legislators--Autographs

Occupations:

  • Army officers, Confederate
  • Representatives, U.S. Congress--Georgia
  • Legislators--United States
  • Attorney
  • Cabinet officers--Confederate States of America
  • Public officials--Georgia
  • Senators, U.S. Congress--Georgia

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Tarrant County (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Washington (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Maryland (as recorded)
  • Wilkes County (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Wilkes County (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Wilkes County (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Savannah (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Georgia--Savannah (as recorded)
  • Washington (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Montgomery (Ala.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)