Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1807-01-19
Death 1870-10-12
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Albert Taylor Bledsoe (1809-1877), a Confederate official, editor, and author, was the first-born son of Moses Ousley and Sophia Childress Taylor. A fellow student of Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee at West Point Military Academy in 1830, Bledsoe performed military duty at western Indian forts. After graduating from Kenyon College in Ohio, he taught mathematics and French at Kenyon and later Miami University. He praticed law for ten years in Springfield, Illinois from 1838-48 but returned to teaching mathematics from 1848-54 at the University of Mississippi and from 1854-61 at the University of Virginia. Commissioned a colonel in the Confederate Army in 1861, he later became assistant secretary of war. President Jefferson Davis sent Bledsoe to London to investigate historical problems involved in the issues between the North and the South and hoped he could influence English public opinion. In 1867 he founded and edited the Southern Review in Baltimore, Maryland, until his death.

From the description of Letter: Lexington, Virginia to Dr. Albert Taylor Bledsoe, 1866 October 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 86172273

Lee spent the first twenty-three years of his military career in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. From 1837 to 1841 he was superintending engineer for the harbor of St. Louis and the upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers.

From the description of DS (fragment), 1838, St. Louis. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525075

Robert E. Lee was a United States Army officer, 1829-1861; commander of Virginia forces in the Confederate Army and military advisor to Jefferson Davis, 1861-1862; commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, 1862-1865; general in chief of all Confederate armies, 1865; president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University), 1865-1870.

From the description of Robert E. Lee papers, 1847; 1862-1869. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 23228793

Virginia native; West Point graduate; veteran of the Mexican War and Confederate general.

From the description of General order no. 14, 1864 February 3. (University of Southern Mississippi, Regional Campus). WorldCat record id: 15582272

From the description of General order no. 9, 10th of April 1865. (Newberry Library). WorldCat record id: 23274468

United State Army officer; Commander-in-chief of Confederate forces during the Civil War.

From the description of Letters, 1844. (New York State Library). WorldCat record id: 50757039

Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870) took command of the main Confederate army in Virginia in 1862. The army then officially became known as the Army of Northern Virginia. Lee remained in command until the army's surrender in 1865.

From the description of Headquarters papers, 1850-1876 (bulk 1862-1865). (Virginia Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 35056249

Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870) served as General of the Confederate Army in the U.S. Civil War and was president of Washington College in Lexington, Virginia from 1865 to 1870.

From the description of Robert E. Lee engineering notebook, 1841-1842. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122687106

From the guide to the Robert E. Lee engineering notebook, 1841-1842, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

American soldier.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Fort Monroe, to "Capt. J. Monroe, U.S. Artillery, N. York Harbour", 1833 May 3. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270595774

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [n.p.], to Major Eli H. Janney, 1864 Mar. 30. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270596729

Commander-in-chief of Confederate forces during Civil War.

From the description of Letter : Lexington, Va., to Elbert Turner 1866 [Nov.] 2. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 30599636

Army officer.

From the description of Papers, 1749-1939. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 19931684

Smith was a Confederate soldier.

From the description of Testimonial : verifying Channing M. Smith's abilities and honorable war record, 1865 November 6. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 122602905

Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant near Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865, thus bringing the American Civil War to an end.

From the description of Robert E. Lee letter, 1865 May 16. (Kentucky Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 50104491

Confederate general.

From the description of Letter : to William Whaley, 1863 Aug. 22. (The South Carolina Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 32144226

From the description of Robert E. Lee letter, 1861 Aug. 29. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 631305064

From the description of Letter, 1866 May 7. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122538357

From the description of Letters, 1863-1864. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122538652

From the description of Autograph letter signed : to his cousin Martha Williams, n.d. [1845? Nov. 10]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270598115

On 18 April 1861 Lee, a 17-year veteran, was offered field command of the U.S. Army. He declined, saying that though he was a unionist he could not fight against his native Virginia if it seceded. The next day he learned of the secession and decided that he would have to resign his commission. On the 25th he was appointed commander of the Virginia forces, and shortly afterward commissioned a general in the Confederate army.

From the description of ALS : Arlington, Va., to Winfield Scott, 1861 Apr. 20. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122541774

Robert E. Lee was the commanding General of the Confederate Army in the Civil War. Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1807. His father was Major General Henry Lee III ("Light Horse Harry"). Lee attended West Point, graduating at the top of his class. Lee was opposed to the succession of the southern states; however, he stood by his native state. After the Civil War Lee became the President of Washington College (present day Washington and Lee University) in 1865 and held that position till his death. Lee used his position as president of the college to show support Johnson's reconstruction plan.

From the guide to the Robert E. Lee Speech, 1865, (Special Collections, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Va.)

General of the Confederate armies in the American Civil War.

From the description of Letter, 1830. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122637595

American soldier and educator. He served as general of the Confederate armies in the Civil War (1861-1865).

From the description of Letter, 1862. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145435279

American soldier, commander-in-chief of the Confederate Armies.

From the description of Letter to Charles Carter Lee, 1863 March 24. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 50298592

From the description of Letter to Charles S. Venable, 1866 July 6. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 32959331

From the description of Letter to Charles S. Venable [manuscript], 1866 July 6. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647807865

Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870) was born in Virginia. He graduated from West Point and was assigned to the Engineer Department. His first service was at Fort Pulaski on Cockspur Island on the Savannah River, then under construction. After serving in several other posts, he became Assistant Chief Engineer in Washington, D.C. He was in the Mexican War under Gen. Winfield Scott. He was for several years Superintendent of West Point. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was offered the field command of the U.S. Army which he refused and soon resigned from his post. In 1861, he was appointed commander of the Virginia forces and served as military adviser to President Jefferson Davis with the rank of General. In 1862, he assumed command of the Army of Northern Virginia and in 1865, he was General-In-Chief of all Confederate armies. He surrendered to Gen. U.S. Grant at Appomattox, Virginia in 1865. After the war he became president of Washington College in Lexington, Virginia where he remained until his death. After his death the name of the College was changed to Washington and Lee University.

From the description of Robert Edward Lee papers, 1838-1871 (Georgia Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 76804430

Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia.

From the description of Robert E. Lee : miscellaneous papers, 1836-1865. (Filson Historical Society, The). WorldCat record id: 49244785

Robert E. Lee, United States Army officer, 1829-1861; commander of Virginia forces in the Confederate Army and military advisor to Jefferson Davis, 1861-1862; commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, 1862-1865; general in chief of all Confederate armies, 1865; president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University), 1865-1870.

From the guide to the Robert E. Lee Papers (#422-z), 1847; 1862-1869, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

U.S. army officer, Confederate general, and president of Washington College.

From the description of Robert E. Lee family collection, 1838-1870. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 759520555

Robert Edward Lee, soldier, Confederate General, and president of Washington College (1865-1870; Lexington, Virginia), was born 19 January 1807, at Stratford, Virginia, and died 12 October 1870, at Lexington, Virginia.

From the description of Papers, 1835-1869. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 173863001

Confederate general, Civil War.

From the description of Letter : Richmond, Va., to Jubal A. Early, Rocky Mount, Franklin county, Va., 1861 May 6. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 31860770

From the description of Letters : Richmond, [Va.], to Ulysses S. Grant and Andrew Johnson, [18]65 June 13. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 31860922

From the description of Letter : A[rmy] N[orthern] V[irgini]a, to A[mbrose] P. Hill, Petersburg, [Virginia], 1864 Oct. 3. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 31860916

Robert E. Lee was a noted American general and commander of the Confederate forces during the Civil War.

From the description of Robert E. Lee collection, 1837-1870. (New-York Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 712650834

At the time of this letter, Lee was president of Washington College in Lexington, Va.

From the description of Letter, 1867 May 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145409391

United States Army officer; Confederate States of America Army general; and president of Washington College.

From the description of Letters of Robert E. Lee, 1830-1860. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 122488259

President of Washington College, 1865-1870.

From the description of Papers, 1792-1935 [bulk, 1865-1870]. (Washington & Lee University). WorldCat record id: 23857962

General in chief of the Confederate armies.

From the description of Papers, 1863-1869. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70975491

From the description of Robert E. Lee papers, 1863-1869. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 166427636

General Lee was Commander-in-Chief of the Confederate Army during the Civil War.

From the description of ALS, 1846 December 26 : Camp near Saltillo, to unknown. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 14392803

Born to Henry Lee and Ann Hill in Westmoreland County, Virginia, Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870), attended West Point from 1825 to 1829. In 1831, he married and had seven children with Mary Ann Randolph Curtis, a descendant of George Washington’s mother. Initially appointed as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Lee fought in several engagements during the 1850s. Although against the secession of Virginia, Lee was offered the command of the Confederate Army after General Joseph Johnston was wounded in battle of Seven Pines in 1862. After assuming command of the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee engaged Ulysses S. Grant’s Army of the Potomac despite being outnumbered on a number of occasions. Eventually succumbing to Grant, he surrendered on April 9, 1865. Following the war, Lee returned to his home in Richmond and served as president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University). He died on October 12, 1870, and is buried in Lexington, Virginia.

Source:

Heiser, John. General Robert Edward Lee. Gettysburg National Military Park. Last modified September 1998. http://www.nps.gov/archive/gett/getttour/sidebar/leebio.htm .

From the guide to the Lee, Robert Edward, Letters 93-127., 1859-1868, 1883, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Confederate General.

Robert E. Lee was born January 19, 1807 at "Stratford" in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Lee graduated from West Point and distinguished himself in the Mexican War 1846-1848. In 1861 he joined the army of the Confederacy of Southern states; in 1862 he received the command of the Army of Northern Virginia and won the Seven Days' Battle defending Richmond, Virginia, the Confederate capital, against General McClellan's Union forces.

In 1863 Lee won victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, both in Virginia, and in 1864 at Cold Harbor, Virginia, but was besieged in Petersburg, Virginia, June 1864-April 1865. He surrendered to General Grant on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse. Following the war he was paroled and served as president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University). His home had been seized by Union forces and now is part of Arlington National Cemetery. He died in 1870.

From the description of Papers, 1865. (Florida State University). WorldCat record id: 50682949

Soldier and Confederate Army General.

Access: open to qualified researchers at The New-York Historical Society.

From the description of Check stubs, 1837-1838. (New York University, Group Batchload). WorldCat record id: 58759808

Born to Henry Lee and Ann Hill in Westmoreland County, Virginia, Robert Edward Lee (1807-1870), attended West Point from 1825 to 1829.

In 1831, he married and had seven children with Mary Ann Randolph Curtis, a descendant of George Washington's mother. Initially appointed as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Lee fought in several engagements during the 1850s. Although against the secession of Virginia, Lee was offered the command of the Confederate Army after General Joseph Johnston was wounded in battle of Seven Pines in 1862. After assuming command of the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee engaged Ulysses S. Grant's Army of the Potomac despite being outnumbered on a number of occasions. Eventually succumbing to Grant, he surrendered on April 9, 1865. Following the war, Lee returned to his home in Richmond and served as president of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University). He died on October 12, 1870, and is buried in Lexington, Virginia.

From the description of Lee, Robert Edward, Letters, 1859-1868, 1883 (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 747040949

Jay Winston Johns, Jr. was a coal industrialist from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who moved to Virginia and became a leader in preserving homes of renowned Virginians. He married Helen Lambert (1881-1964). Johns became blind in the late 1950's.

He and his wife owned "Ash Lawn," Albemarle County, Virginia which had been the home of James Monroe and designed by Thomas Jefferson. Johns was founder of the Lee-Jackson Memorial, Inc., a foundation dedicated to preserving the memory of Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson and the South's part in the Civil War; and a founder of the Virginia Trust for Historic Preservation, an organization whose main purpose was that of purchasing, restoring, and maintaining for the public, homes of renowned men specifically, the Lee-Fendall House in Alexandria, Virginia.

Johns, himself was a strong Democrat and corresponded with and publicly supported all of the prominent Virginia political figures of his time. He was a spirited supporter of the Virginia Military Institute as a member of the Board of Visitors, and as an honorary member of the Alumni Association; a charter member, and later trustee of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and a member of the Virginia Chapter of the Society of the Cincinnati. He also received an honorary degree from the College of William and Mary in 1967.

From the guide to the Jay Johns Papers, 1918-1974., (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

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Subjects:

  • Military Bases
  • Traveller (Horse)
  • Finance, Personal--History--19th century
  • Letters--Publishing
  • Reconstruction
  • Robert E. Lee Centennial, 1907
  • Education
  • Rabbits
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848
  • Tablecloths
  • High Holidays
  • Military engineering
  • Prisoners
  • Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of, Va., 1864
  • Prisoners of war
  • Rabbis--Correspondence
  • Civil war--Campaigns
  • Insurance
  • Trials (military offenses)
  • Maryland Campaign, 1862
  • Plantations
  • Conduct of life
  • Generals--Correspondence
  • Military education
  • Generals--19th century
  • Lee Endowment Fund
  • Foreign workers
  • Patriotism
  • Maps
  • Buttons--Collectors and collecting
  • Manuscript maps
  • Railroad--19th century
  • Administration of estates
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  • Generals--Biography--Sources
  • Surveying
  • Desertion, Military
  • Fire engines
  • Cedar Mountain, Battle of, Va., 1862
  • Slavery
  • Railroads
  • Publishers and Publishing
  • Plantations--Management--History--1783-1865
  • Harbors
  • Cheat Mountain, Battle of, W. Va., 1861
  • Commencement ceremonies
  • Fredericksburg, Battle of, Fredericksburg, Va., 1862
  • Public schools
  • Fortification--New York (State)--New York
  • Soldiers--Biography--Sources
  • Kelly's Ford, Battle of, Va., 1863
  • Generals--Archives
  • Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
  • Water-power
  • Harbors--Maintenance and repair
  • Königgrätz, Battle of, Sadová, Czech Republic, 1866
  • Military maneuvers
  • Civil war
  • Wilderness, Battle of the, Va., 1864
  • Speeches, addresses, etc., American
  • Surveying--New York (State)--New York
  • General order #9
  • Amnesty
  • Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa., 1863
  • presidents
  • Appomattox Campaign, 1865
  • Capitulation, Military
  • Bull Run, 1st Battle of, Va., 1861
  • Peninsular Campaign, 1862
  • Widows--Finance, Personal
  • Ash Lawn (Virginia : Estate)
  • Fortification
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848--Maps
  • Military topography--Maps
  • Life insurance
  • Recruiting and enlistment--History
  • Shingle industry
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
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  • Cold Harbor, Battle of, Va., 1864

Occupations:

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  • Rockbridge Baths (Va.) (as recorded)
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  • Maryland--Baltimore (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Rio Grande (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
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  • Smith Island (Md. and Va.) (as recorded)
  • Cockspur Island (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Shenandoah River Valley (Va. and W. Va.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Rappahannock River Valley (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Orange (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Lexington (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Covesville (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Rockbridge Baths (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Savannah (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)