National Orchestral Association (U.S.)

Alternative names
Dates:
Active 1938
Active 1968

Biographical notes:

The National Orchestral Association (NOA) was founded in 1930 by Leon Barzinto give student musicians an opportunity to gain experience.

A New York Timesarticle of December 7, 1930 defined the purposes of the N.O.A. as, "To furnishthe American orchestral instrumentalist with the same practical opportunities in training and routine which have been open to the European-born players; to supply this training as post-graduate work which the directors of the organization assert is minimized in American conservatories; to prepare players in the reading of standard orchestral literature and to equip them for symphonic posts; to afford young soloists experience before audiences, to play works by young composers, tog ive apprentice conductors necessary baton technique and directing routine and also to train a nucleus of concertgoers". An important function of the N.O.A. wasits role in commissioning and performing many new compositions.

Barzin served as conductor of the National Orchestral Associaton until 1958, when John Barnett became his successor, himself a graduate of the N.O.A. conductor training program. After a twelve year absence, Barzin once again assumed the position of musical director of the National Orchestral Association, but instead of assuming the conducting resposibilites as well, decided that the organization would be led by Americans who were part of the organization's new conductor's training program.

By 1948, former members of the orchestra were members of thirty seven leading American orchestras.

Barzin's final appearance with the National Orchestral Association occurred onApril 6, 1976 at Carnegie Hall.

From the description of National Orchestral Association rehearsal and concert recordings [sound recording], 1938-1968. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122431169

The National Orchestral Assocation (NOA) was founded in 1930 by Leon Barzin to give student musicians an opportunity to gain experience. A New York Times article of December 7, 1930 defined the purposes of the N.O.A. as, "To furnish the American orchestral instrumentalist with the same practical opportunities in training and routine which have been open to the European-born players; to supply this training as post-graduate work which the directors of the organization assert is minimized in American conservatories; to prepare players in the reading of standard orchestral literature and to equip them for symphonic posts; to afford young soloists experience before audiences, to play works by young composers, to give apprentice conductors necessary baton technique and directing routine and also to train a nucleus of concertgoers". An important function of the N.O.A. was its role in commissioning and performing many new compositions.

Barzin served as conductor of the National Orchestral Associaton until 1958, when John Barnett became his successor, himself a graduate of the N.O.A. conductor training program. After a twelve year absence, Barzin once again assumed the position of musical director of the National Orchestral Association, but instead of assuming the conducting resposibilites as well, decided that the organization would be led by Americans who were part of the organization's new conductor's training program.

By 1948, former members of the orchestra were members of thirty seven leading American orchestras.

Barzin's final appearance with the National Orchestral Association occurred on April 6, 1976 at Carnegie Hall.

From the guide to the National Orchestral Association collection of rehearsal and concert recordings [sound recording], 1938-1968, (The New York Public Library. Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound.)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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SNAC ID:
63122811

Subjects:

  • Orchestral music

Occupations:

not available for this record

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