Rosser, J. Barkley (John Barkley), 1907-

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1907-12-06
Death 1989-09-05
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

J. Barkley Rosser was born in Jacksonville, Florida in 1907. He earned both his Bachelor of Science (1929) and Master of Science (1931) from the University of Florida. He obtained his Ph. D. from Princeton University in 1934. Subsequently, Rosser taught at Princeton, Harvard, and Cornell and spent the latter part of his career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He continued to lecture well into his late 70s, and died at his home in Madison in 1989. Rosser contributed to many committees and professional associations in addition to his teaching: he served as president of the Association for Symbolic Logic and the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics; was a member of the space vehicle panel for the advisory committee of the Apollo project; was an early contributor to computer science theory; and helped develop the Polaris missile. While at the University of Wisconsin, he served as the director of the U.S. Army Mathematics Research Center. His areas of expertise include symbolic logic, ballistics, rocket development, and numerical analysis.

From the description of Rosser, J. Barkley, papers, 1931-1989. (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 52626776

J. Barkley Rosser was born in Jacksonville, Florida in 1907. He earned both his Bachelor of Science (1929) and his Master of Science (1931) from the University of Florida. He obtained his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1934. After getting his Ph.D., Rosser taught at Princeton, Harvard, and Cornell and spent the latter part of his career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He continued to lecture well into his late 70s, and died at his home in Madison in 1989.

Rosser contributed to many committees and professional associations in addition to his teaching: he served as president of the Association for Symbolic Logic and the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics; was a member of the space vehicle panel for the advisory committee of the Apollo project; was an early contributor to computer science theory; and helped develop the Polaris missile. While at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he served as the director of the U. S. Army Mathematics Research Center. Rosser is known for his part in the Church-Rosser theorem, in lambda calculus, and he developed the Rosser sieve.

His areas of expertise include symbolic logic, ballistics, rocket development, and numerical analysis.

From the guide to the J. Barkley Rosser Papers 91-1., 1931-1989, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6pk23zf
Ark ID:
w6pk23zf
SNAC ID:
58941868

Subjects:

  • Mathematics--Study and teaching
  • Numerical analysis
  • Ballistics
  • Rockets (ordnance)
  • Magic squares
  • Number theory
  • Logic, Symbolic and mathematical
  • Symbolic and mathematical logic
  • Mathematics - study and teaching--United States

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)