Bunshaft, Gordon, 1909-1990

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1909-05-09
Death 1990-08-06
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Gordon Bunshaft's office was located at 425 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y.

From the description of [Garage addition, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Bunshaft, 25 & 26 Georgica Close, East Hampton, L.I., N.Y.] [graphic] / Gordon Bunshaft, architect. Jan. 19-21, 1970. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 78144161

At the time of this project, Gordon Bunshaft's office was located at 425 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y.

From the description of [Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Bunshaft, 25 & 26 Georgica Close, East Hampton, L.I., N.Y.] [graphic] / Gordon Bunshaft, architect. June - Aug. [19]62. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 83449520

These renderings were executed by Bunshaft while studying under the Rotch Travelling Scholarship during the years 1935-1936.

From the description of [Renderings executed in Europe as the 50th Rotch Scholar] [graphic] / Gordon Bunshaft. 1936. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 78830626

These rubbings were executed while studying under the Rotch Travelling Scholarship during the years 1935-1936.

From the description of [Rubbings of bronze flat - floor tombstones from the Louvre, Paris, France] [graphic] / Gordon Bunshaft. [19]35. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 83106950

Bunshaft's office was located at 400 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y.

From the description of [Bunshaft studio, 25 & 26 Georgica Close, East Hampton, Long Island, N.Y. [graphic] / Gordon Bunshaft, architect. [19]62 ; Dec.[19]75 - May 1976. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 271454168

Gordon Bunshaft (1909-1990) received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and was awarded the Rotch Travelling Scholarship shortly after graduation in 1935. Bunshaft used his scholarship to travel through Europe, where he sketched and photographed many sites of architectural significance. In 1937, Bunshaft joined the New York office of the young architectural firm Skidmore Owings & Merrill, taking a leave of absence between 1942 and 1946 to serve in the United States Army Corps of Engineers. After World War II, SOM was to become one of the most influential architecture, planning, and design firms in the United States. Bunshaft was named a partner in SOM in 1949, directing the New York office until his retirement in 1979. Bunshaft's impact on American architecture was largely in the arena of large-scale corporate architecture. In 1952, he completed the design of Lever House in New York City, a landmark of Post-War International Style glass curtain-wall skyscrapers. Among his other noted designs are the Chase Manhattan Bank in New York City; Connecticut General Headquarters in Bloomfield, Connecticut; the Beinecke Rare Book Library at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut; the Lyndon B. Johnson Library in Austin, Texas; and the National Commercial Bank and Haj Terminal in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Bunshaft also received many awards, including the Pritzker Architecture Prize, the American Institute of Architect's Medal of Honor and election to the College of Fellows, and the National Institute of Arts and Letter's first prize in architecture (Arnold W. Brunner Memorial). Bunshaft was also a passionate art collector, maintaining long-standing friendships with such notable artists as Henry Moore and Jean Dubuffet, and serving as a member of the Fine Arts Commission in Washington, D.C. and as a trustee of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Bunshaft died in New York City in 1990.

From the description of Gordon Bunshaft architectural drawings and papers, 1909-1990 (bulk 1950-1979). (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 505724648

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Subjects:

  • Architects' houses
  • Arch bridges
  • Residences
  • Entrance
  • Towers (building divisions)
  • Gates
  • College
  • Fortresses
  • Follies
  • Screen doors
  • Towers
  • Arches
  • Plumbing systems
  • Gondolas
  • Jambs
  • bathrooms
  • Fountain
  • Architecture--History--20th century
  • Electrical systems
  • Heating systems
  • Bases (components)
  • Garages
  • Fireplaces
  • Lighting
  • Churches
  • Storage buildings
  • Architecture--Designs and plans
  • Utility rooms
  • Closets
  • Cottages
  • Portals
  • Studios (work spaces)
  • Addition
  • Architectural photography
  • Town Hall
  • Sills
  • Utility buildings
  • Tombstones
  • Doorheads
  • Furnaces
  • Gate towers
  • Oral History
  • Cathedrals
  • Walls
  • Houses
  • Angle columns
  • Market places
  • Arched bridges

Occupations:

  • Artists

Places:

  • Carcassonne (France) (as recorded)
  • Salamanca (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Toledo (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Segovia (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Salamanca (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Toledo (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Georgica Close (East Hampton, N.Y.)--25 and 26 (as recorded)
  • Carcassonne (France) (as recorded)
  • Bautzen (Germany) (as recorded)
  • Siena (Italy) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Avila (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Tarragona (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Ile-aux-moines (as recorded)
  • Burgos (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Mistra (Greece) (as recorded)
  • Saint-Malo (France) (as recorded)
  • San Sebastián (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Elven (France) (as recorded)
  • East Hampton (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Fontainbleau (France) (as recorded)
  • Pisa (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Albí (Spain) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Nuremberg (Germany) (as recorded)
  • Avignon (France) (as recorded)
  • Greece (as recorded)
  • Auray (France) (as recorded)
  • Carcassonne (France) (as recorded)
  • East Hampton (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Rome (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Burgos (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Venice (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Bruges (Belgium) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Segovia (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Avignon (France) (as recorded)
  • Toledo (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Rome (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Canterbury (England) (as recorded)
  • Assisi (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Georgica Close (East Hampton, N.Y.)--25 and 26 (as recorded)
  • Syracuse (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Montpellier (France) (as recorded)
  • Pisa (Italy) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Valladolid (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Tétouan (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • Segovia (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Toulouse (France) (as recorded)
  • East Hampton (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Poitiers (France) (as recorded)
  • East Hamtpon (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Cahors (France) (as recorded)
  • Marseille (France) (as recorded)
  • Capri (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Marseille (France) (as recorded)
  • Assisi (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Avila (Spain) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Segovia (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Vannes (France) (as recorded)
  • Salamanca (Spain) (as recorded)
  • Nîmes (France) (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Perugia (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Georgica Close (East Hampton, N.Y.)--25 (as recorded)
  • Arles (France) (as recorded)