Great Britain. Army

Alternative names
Dates:
Active 1918
Active 1922
Britons
English

History notes:

Whitmore was govenor of Cape Breton Island and the Island of St. John (Prince Edward Island).

From the description of Receipt for wages paid for labor in the Cape Breton colliery : manuscript, 1760. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612812416

Administrative history unavailable. The University of Victoria Libraries Special Collections has a mandate to acquire military papers.

From the description of Great Britain Army collection. [1800-1941]. (University of Victoria Libraries). WorldCat record id: 646006430

The King's American Regiment was formed at Flat Bush, New York, under the command of Colonel Edmund Fanning (1739-1818), on December 11, 1776. The regiment was comprised of Loyalists from New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, and was stationed at Kingsbridge for much of 1777. On October 6, 1777, the regiment participated in attacks at Forts Clinton and Montgomery under General Henry Clinton. In 1778 and 1779, the corps carried out attacks in Rhode Island and Connecticut, and in 1780 they were sent to Charleston, South Carolina, to join the Southern Campaign. They spent the winter of 1781 in Savannah, Georgia, and returned to New York in December 1782, when the British evacuated Charleston. The regiment became part of the 4th American Regiment on March 7, 1781, and disbanded in 1783.

From the guide to the King's American Regiment orderly book, 1776-1777, (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan)

In 1776, the British formed a treaty with the duke of Brunswick and other minor German princes that allowed the hiring of German mercenaries to bolster the British Army in North America. These German Auxiliaries muster rolls document the German regiments employed by the British to fight in the American Revolutionary War. England would pay the German princes annual subsidies, as well as additional fees, for wounded and killed soldiers. All together, approximately 30,000 men came to America from Germany and fought for the British in virtually every major campaign in the war.

From the guide to the German Auxiliaries muster rolls, 1776-1786, 1781-1783, (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan)

Sunbury was once the county seat of Liberty County, Georgia. It was founded in 1758 and was a thriving seaport, rivaling Savannah's port. In 1779 the town the adjacent Fort Morris were attacked and captured by British soldiers led by Col. John Harris Cruger. Col. John McIntosh, leader of the Continental troops, surrendered the town and the fort; in total, seventeen commissioned officers and 195 non-commissioned officers and privates were taken as prisoners of war. The town and fort, renamed Fort George, remained under British control until the end of the Revolutionary War. At the time of the British evacuation, most of the town and fort had been burned. Sunbury failed to thrive after the war, and by 1878 was named one of the "dead towns" of Georgia.

From the description of Sunbury (Ga.) Prisoners oath (Georgia Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 77006977

Bourn (1694-1763) was from Barnstable; he served as captain in the regiment of Colonel John Thomas.

From the description of A muster-roll of the company in His Majesty's service, under the command of Silvanus Bourn, captain : manuscript, 1760. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612815865

Photograph album of Capt. R. E. Godfrey, containing 167 black/white snapshots, many with captions, recording service with the British 153rd Rifles in North Africa, 1918-1919, and in the Arab Revolt, 1920. About 70 of the images are from Egypt and surrounding areas (Suez Canal, Ismailia, Great Pyramids, Alexandria, Kantara, Mansourah). The approximately 30 Arab Revolt images are from Iraq (Nasiriyah, Imam Abdullah, Kut, Baghdad). Most images are of British and Indian officers and troops, barracks, camp life, along with some of the countryside and city scenes. Also interspersed are a few images with friends back in Great Britain and apparently on vacation elsewhere in Europe, ca. 1921-1922.

From the description of British Military in Egypt and Iraq Photograph Album, [ca. 1918-1922] (University of California, Santa Barbara). WorldCat record id: 232363130

The Charles Cornwallis orderly book documents events in the southern theater of the American Revolutionary War, particularly in North Carolina and Virginia, from February 8, 1781-July 13, 1781. Many of the orders were issued by Charles Cornwallis (1738--1805), a British lieutenant-general during American Revolution. In February 1781, Cornwallis and his army were in pursuit of the American Army of the South under General Nathanael Greene. Both armies were stationed in North Carolina but avoided engagement until March 15 at the battle at Guilford Court House. Though the British won the battle, they failed to defeat Greene and suffered heavy casualties. By May 10th, Cornwallis had moved his army to Virginia, and on May 20th, he took control of the British Army in that state. Cornwallis then pursued Lafayette's army through Virginia but failed to engage them in a decisive battle. Cornwallis' army arrived in Richmond, Virginia, on June 17th and moved to Jamestown in early July. They faced the Americans on July 6th, in the Battle of Green Spring, near Jamestown, Virginia, but this too was an indecisive encounter. Cornwallis next moved to defend the British held Yorktown, where he was forced to surrender on October 19th, 1781.

From the guide to the Charles Cornwallis orderly book, Cornwallis, Charles, orderly book, 1780-1781, (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan)

Sir Henry Clinton was the British Commander-in-Chief in North America, 1778-1782. Captain Simon Fraser was the commander of the Corps of Guides and Pioneers, one of the American loyalist units of the British Army.

From the description of By His Excellency Sir Henry Clinton, K.B. General and Commander in Chief of all His Majesty's Forces, within the Colonies laying on the Atlantic Ocean from Nova-Scotia to West-Florida, inclusive, &c. &c. &c. : you are hereby directed and required ... to be paid to Captain Simon Fraser ... Philadelphia, the 7th day of June 1778 / by His Excellency's command, H. Clinton. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 190685010

Sir William Howe (1729-1814) was the British commander-in-chief in North America from October 1775 to 1777. Taking over the office from Thomas Gage, he concentrated the British army around New York City, and in 1776, fought the rebels at Long Island, Kip's Bay, White Plains, and Fort Washington, eventually forcing the American troops out of the area. The British, however, lost battles at Trenton (December 1776) and Princeton (January 1777). In September of 1777, Howe and his forces moved into Pennsylvania, where they were victorious at the Battle at Brandywine (September 11, 1777). Focusing on Pennsylvania, however, came at the expense of supporting Burgoyne's army at Saratoga, where the British forces surrendered to the Continental troops on October 17, 1777. Under severe criticism, Howe submitted his resignation to London at the end of 1777, and in May 1778 transferred his command to Sir Henry Clinton. During this period of inactivity, Howe's headquarters remained in Philadelphia.

From the guide to the William Howe orderly book, Howe, William, orderly book, 1776-1778, (William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan)

During World War II, the Political Warfare Executive (PWE) was a British clandestine body created to produce and disseminate both pro-Allied and anti-Axis propaganda, with the aim of damaging enemy morale and sustaining the morale of the occupied countries.

The Psychological Warfare Division was a joint effort between the United States and Great Britain, and conducted similar operations during and following D-Day, 1944.

From the guide to the World War II Propaganda Leaflets, 1941-1945, (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University)

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Subjects:

  • Armed Forces--Procurement
  • Coal mines and mining History
  • Long Island, Battle of, New York, N.Y., 1776
  • Desertion, Military
  • Orderly books
  • Horses
  • Prisoners of war
  • Philadelphia Campaign, 1777-1778
  • World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons
  • New York (N.Y.)--History--Revolution, 1775-1783
  • Armies, Cost of--17th century
  • Royal George (Ship)
  • American loyalists
  • Military art and science--Early works to 1800
  • Seven Years' War, 1756-1763
  • Sutlers
  • United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783
  • Ribbons--19th century
  • Medals--19th century
  • Translators
  • Indians of North America--Government relations
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)--History--Revolution, 1775-1783
  • Hessian mercenaries--Registers
  • Guilford Courthouse, Battle of, N.C., 1781
  • Textile fabrics--20th century
  • Military history
  • Courts-martial and courts of inquiry
  • Seven Years' War, 1756-1763--Equipment and supplies
  • Military discipline
  • Ribbons--20th century
  • Mercenary troops--Great Britain
  • Military supplies
  • Camden, Battle of, Camden, S.C., 1780
  • Military decorations
  • Saratoga Campaign, N.Y., 1777
  • Medals--20th century
  • Quebec Campaign, 1759

Occupations:

not available for this record

Functions:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Fort Stanwix (Rome, N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Anhalt (Germany) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Annapolis Royal (N.S.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Sunbury (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Germany (as recorded)
  • Connecticut (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Prince Edward Island (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Newport (R.I.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New Haven (Conn.) (as recorded)
  • Cape Breton Island (N.S.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Staten Island (New York, N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Fort Stanwix (Rome, N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Oswego County (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Port-la-Joye--Fort Amherst National Historic Site (P.E.I.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Hanau-Munzenberg (Germany) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Mississippi River Valley (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Niagara Frontier (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Seven Year's War, 1756-1763 (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Britain (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • New Hartford (Conn.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Niagara Frontier (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Fort Morris (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Lincoln County (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Hesse-Kassel (Electorate) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Canada (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Yorktown (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisbourg (N.S.) (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Egypt (as recorded)
  • Oswego County (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • New York (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • New York (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Yorktown (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Yorktown (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Iraq (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • North Carolina (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • Staten Island (New York, N.Y.) (as recorded)