Revels, Hiram R. (Hiram Rhoades), 1827-1901

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1827-09-27
Death 1901-01-16
Americans

Biographical notes:

Revels began his political career as an alderman in Natchez, Miss. in 1868 and was elected to the Mississippi State Senate in 1869. The state legislature in January 1870 elected him to the U.S. Senate, and after acrimonious debate, the Senate seated him to fill the expired term of Jefferson Davis, and he served as senator from February 1870 until March 1871. Among other issues, Revels voted for enforcement of the Fifteenth Amendment. His political career, however was typified by some of his accommodationist views and practices.

In the early 1870's Revels was named the first president of Alcorn College, a black school, in Rodney, Mississippi, but he was not an adept administrator and became caught between the demands of a white dominated legislature and some members of the faculty and student body who wanted him to be a more aggressive leader. Despite these problems, he served as president from 1871 to 1873 and again from 1876 to 1882.

Revels and his wife, Phoebe Rebecca Bass Revels, had six daughters, including Susie Revels (1870-1943). She taught school in Mississippi until her marriage in 1896 to Horace Roscoe Cayton.

From the description of Hiram Revels Collection, 1870-1948. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 144652089

Revels began his political career as an alderman in Natchez, Miss. in 1868 and was elected to the Mississippi State Senate in 1869. The state legislature in January 1870 elected him to the U.S. Senate, and after acrimonious debate, the Senate seated him to fill the expired term of Jefferson Davis, and he served as senator from February 1870 until March 1871. Among other issues, Revels voted for enforcement of the Fifteenth Amendment. His political career, however was typified by some of his accommodationist views and practices.

In the early 1870's Revels was named the first president of Alcorn College, a black school, in Rodney, Mississippi, but he was not an adept administrator and became caught between the demands of a white dominated legislature and some members of the faculty and student body who wanted him to be a more aggressive leader. Despite these problems, he served as president from 1871 to 1873 and again from 1876 to 1882.

Revels and his wife, Phoebe Rebecca Bass Revels, had six daughters, including Susie Revels (1870-1943). She taught school in Mississippi until her marriage in 1896 to Horace Roscoe Cayton.

From the guide to the Hiram Revels Collection, 1870-1948, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

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Subjects:

  • African American college administrators
  • African American clergy
  • African American college administrators--Mississippi
  • African American legislators
  • African Americans--19th century
  • African American legislators--Mississippi

Occupations:

  • Educators
  • Clergy
  • Legislators
  • College presidents

Places:

  • United States, 00, US
  • Fayetteville, NC, US
  • Mississippi, MS, US