Goldberger, Joseph, 1874-1929

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1874-07-16
Death 1929-01-17

Biographical notes:

Joseph Goldberger was a physician, medical researcher, and epidemiologist with the United States Public Health Service, 1899-1929.

From the description of Joseph Goldberger papers, 1891-1949 [manuscript]. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 23907223

Joseph Goldberger was born in Hungary but immigrated to New York as a child. He was educated there and later practiced medicine in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., before joining the United States Public Health Service in 1899. During his time with the Public Health Service, Goldberger studied various diseases and discovered the cause of and cure for pellagra.

From the guide to the Joseph Goldberger Papers, 1891-1949, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

Joseph Goldberger earned his medical degree at New York City's Bellevue College in 1895. Wanting to play a more dynamic role in medicine, he left his private practice and joined the U.S. Marine Hospital Service as an Assistant Surgeon in 1899. He spent the next fifteen years in the field working to eradicate epidemics of yellow fever, typhoid fever, dengue fever, and typhus in the United States and Central America. In 1914 the Surgeon General selected Goldberger to determine the cause of pellagra. His research successfully demonstrated that the condition was dietary in origin and largely the result of vitamin B deficiency. Controversy followed his conclusions. Much of the medical community was unwilling to concede that pellagra was not a germ-based disease. The means for pellagra's eradication, an improved diet for poor southern farmers, implied a need for social improvement, a theory that many resisted.

From the guide to the Joseph Goldberger Papers, 1909-1940, (History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine)

Joseph Goldberger earned his medical degree at New York City's Bellevue College in 1895. Wanting to play a more dynamic role in medicine, he left his private practice and joined the U.S. Marine Hospital Service as an Assistant Surgeon in 1899. He spent the next fifteen years in the field working to eradicate epidemics of yellow fever, typhoid fever, dengue fever, and typhus in the United States and Central America. In 1914 the Surgeon General selected Goldberger to determine the cause of pellagra, focusing on South Carolina as his research base. His research successfully demonstrated that the condition was dietary in origin and largely the result of vitamin B deficiency. Controversy followed his conclusions. Much of the medical community was unwilling to concede that pellagra was not a germ-based disease. The means for pellagra's eradication, an improved diet for poor southern farmers, implied a need for social improvement, a theory that many resisted.

From the description of Joseph Goldberger papers, 1909-1940. (National Library of Medicine). WorldCat record id: 14318676

Physician and medical researcher.

Goldberger was an alumnus of City College, Class of 1893.

From the description of Papers, [ca. 1929-1935] (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155502766

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ns16cf
Ark ID:
w6ns16cf
SNAC ID:
61243001

Subjects:

  • Public health
  • Typhus fever--Research--History--20th century
  • Pellagra
  • Dengue--Research--History--20th century
  • Disease
  • Epidemiology--Research--History--20th century
  • Communicable diseases--History--19th century
  • Physicians--History--20th century
  • Pellagra--Treatment
  • Epidemiologists--History--20th century
  • Research
  • Pellagra--Research
  • Pellagra--Research--History--20th century
  • Yellow fever--Research--History--20th century
  • Medicine

Occupations:

  • Physicians

Places:

  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • West Indies (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)