Goldwater, Barry M. (Barry Morris), 1909-1998

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1909-01-01
Death 1998-05-29
Americans
English, Spanish; Castilian, Chinese

Biographical notes:

Barry Goldwater has been a senator from Arizona since 1952. In 1964, he ran for the Presidency on the Republican ticket, against Lyndon Johnson.

From the guide to the Barry Goldwater Collection, 1964., (Cline Library. Special Collections and Archives Department)

Senator.

From the description of Reminiscences of Barry M. Goldwater : oral history, 1967. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 86158467

Senator Barry M. Goldwater - politician, ham radio operator, western art collector, aviator, and master photographer. Goldwater was an avid collector of Western Americana including the historic photographs in this collection. He loved the topography and romance of the West and sought to collect images to represent this ideal. Though considered a hobby, his collecting also served the greater purpose of documenting the history of Arizona. Goldwater even went so far as to place newspaper ads requesting those with historic photographs and ephemera to contact him for a possible donation or sale. He also opened up his home to students and researchers interested in viewing his collection. Now available for the world to see, this collection along with his fine art photographs depicts an Arizona rarely seen. "To attempt to show adequately the beauties of Arizona, either by pictures or by words, has always seemed to me a task too great for man. Neither the lens nor the written word can show the history or the romance that adds so much to the beauties with which this state has been endowed"--Barry M. Goldwater, Arizona Portraits (1940).

From the description of Barry M. Goldwater Historic Photograph Collection, ca. 1850-ca. 1960. (Scottsdale Public Library). WorldCat record id: 131371541

Shadegg was a Phoenix, Arizona, pharmaceutical manufacturer and political consultant. He served as campaign manager and advisor to Phoenix businessman Barry Goldwater, who was first elected to the U.S. Senate in 1952 and reelected in 1958. Shadegg was a regional coordinator for Goldwater's 1964 presidential campaign against Lyndon B. Johnson and assisted with his subsequent Senate campaigns. Goldwater retired from the Senate in January 1987.

From the description of Goldwater, Barry, collection, 1949-1965. (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 21237930

Senator Barry M. Goldwater - politician, ham radio operator, western art collector, aviator, and master photographer. Goldwater's interest in photography began in 1934 when his wife Peggy gave him a 2 1/4 inch redflex camera for Christmas. He pursued it as a hobby but he also had a definite purpose. The Goldwater family had been in Arizona since the mid 19th century and had established themselves as both businessmen and devoted civil servants. His interest in the people and places of Arizona ran deep and he decided to build his own historical record of the state. He carried a camera with him everywhere he went and it became an extension of Goldwater himself. Over the next thirty years, during his travels of his home state, the United States, and the world, he took 15,000 photographs and over 25 miles of film. Instructed by local photographer Tom Bate, inspired by Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, Goldwater developed a talent for photography that would be recognized worldwide. Since 1935, his photographs have been featured in approximately 250 shows. He was admitted as an associate member of the Royal Photographic Society and was a lifetime member of the Photographic Society of America. Goldwater frequently contributed to Arizona Highways and published over ten books featuring his photographs including Arizona Portraits (1940), The Face of Arizona (1964), and Delightful Journey (1970). While Goldwater was a popular Republican Senator, his true legacy was the photographic record he left for the people of Arizona. No other individual has documented so thoroughly the people and places of this state. His fine art prints and negatives can be fount at three Arizona institutions: the Arizona Historical Foundation, the Heard Museum, and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona. "My photography has taken me over, literally, every mile of the southwest, over both poles and every major country on the globe. But it is to Arizona that I turn for my inspiration and what I think has been my best work. It is my desire to share with future generations the Southwest that I love"--Barry M. Goldwater, Barry Goldwater and the Southwest (1976).

From the description of Barry M. Goldwater Fine Arts Photograph Collection, 1938-1968 ca. 1940-1965. (Scottsdale Public Library). WorldCat record id: 131372037

Barry M. Goldwater, an Arizona senator, was a United States presidential candidate in 1964.

From the guide to the Barry Goldwater papers, 1964-1965., (Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library)

Biographical note: Legislator; Barry Goldwater served Arizona in the U. S. Senate for most of his career. He campaigned for President in 1964.

From the description of Campaign materials and correspondence with AHS, ca. 1939-1964. (Arizona Historical Society, Southern Arizona Division). WorldCat record id: 407126051

Barry Goldwater is best known as an Arizona politician, having begun his career as a Phoenix city council member, later serving as United States Senator, and having run for the Presidency in 1964. However, he is also known for his interests in Arizona history, Native American arts and photography. Goldwater began photography as a hobby in 1934, when his wife gave him a camera for Christmas. He took lessons from Tom Bate, a studio photographer in Phoenix. Although always an amateur, he has a master's reputation, having work shown in more that 250 exhibitions. His publications include Barry Goldwater and the Southwest and people and places (New York: Random House, 1967). He has also had many photographs reproduced in Arizona highways.

From the description of Native American portraits, ca. 1946-ca. 1955 / by Barry Goldwater. (The Heard Museum Library). WorldCat record id: 56719116

Politician.

Barry M. Goldwater, an Arizona senator, was a United States presidential candidate in 1964.

From the description of Barry Goldwater papers, 1964-1965. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 64074660

Aviator. Athlete. Adventurer. Author. Military Officer. Businessman. Ham Operator. Photographer. Politician.

Barry M. Goldwater was born in Phoenix, Arizona January 1, 1909. He attended grade school in Phoenix and at age 13, succeeded in setting up the first commercial radio transmitter in Arizona, KFDA - the 36th station licensed in the U.S. He attended high school at Staunton Military Academy in Virginia where he became an outstanding cadet and student athlete. He played football, ran track, and was captain of the record-setting swim team. After graduation, he enrolled at the University of Arizona. His academic career was cut short in 1929 by his father's death where upon he entered the family business, Goldwaters department store. Starting as a junior clerk, Goldwater progressed to become President and eventually Chairman of the Board - a position he held until 1953.

He married Margaret (Peggy) Johnson of Muncie Indiana in 1934. They had four children, Joanne, Barry Jr., Michael, and Margaret (Peggy) Jr. Peggy died in 1985. In 1992, he married Susan Wechlser.

In 1940, he joined Norman Nevills on a 42-day trip down the Green and Colorado Rivers and became the 71st person to travel the full length of the Colorado. His film, photographs, slides and lecture "Shooting the rapids" took him to venues throughout Arizona. He drew large audiences, thus setting the stage for future political campaigns. His award-winning photography was exhibited worldwide and won him membership in the prestigious Royal Photographic Society.

Barry Goldwater's military career spanned 37 years. During WWII, he volunteered for active duty in 1942 but was rejected due to his age and previous athletic injuries. He persisted and eventually was assigned to Yuma, Arizona where he was a gunnery instructor and perfected a technique that increased target accuracy. He later became one of 10 pilots to fly P-47 Thunderbolts across the North Atlantic to Europe. He retired in 1969 as a Major General in the U.S. Air Force Reserves. By the end of his career, he logged 15,000 hours of flight time, flew over 250 aircraft, and received numerous awards, medals, and commendations.

He launched his political career in 1949 on a Republican reform platform and won a seat on the Phoenix City Council. In 1952, Barry Goldwater challenged the incumbent Ernest McFarland and won a seat in the U.S. Senate. He served two terms then ran for President against Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. Although it was a landslide defeat, Goldwater emerged as a political icon for the conservative movement and the Republican Party. He was re-elected to the Senate in 1968 and served until his retirement in 1986. During his thirty-year career, he served on the Banking and Currency, Labor and Public Welfare, Interior and Insular Affairs, Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Armed Forces, Labor and Public Welfare, Select Committee on Intelligence, Indian Affairs, and Commerce, Science and Transportation and Small Business committees. These reflect his lifelong interests in aviation, amateur radio, technology, defense, labor and union issues, national security, and Native Americans.

On May 29, 1998, Barry M. Goldwater died at his home in Phoenix from complications of a stroke.

From the description of The personal and political papers of Senator Barry M. Goldwater (1909-1998), 1880s-2008. (Scottsdale Public Library). WorldCat record id: 63171789

The designation dime novel refers to a variety of publications, including story papers and five and ten cent weeklies, that were printed from 1860 to 1926. The pulp fiction of the day, they provided an exciting escape for their readers. The stories represent several genres, including Wild West adventures, detective stories, urban outlaws, and romance. The first publisher of dime novels was Beadles in New York. The popularity of the dime novel grew quickly, as did the number of publishers and series. Series included, but are not limited to, The New York Detective Library, Beadle's Dime Novels, Beadle's Half Dime Library, Beadle's New York Dime Library, Old Sleuth Library, The New Buffalo Bill Weekly, Pluck and Luck, and the New Nick Carter Weekly .

While some stories stand alone, many were printed in a serial format with recurring characters like Buffalo Bill or Nick Carter. In addition to stories, some versions included brief news-of-the-day snippets. The most well known dime novel series had national circulations, with some issues selling over 300,000 thousand copies. The cover illustrations are of equal interest. The first 28 dime novels came in plain wrappers. Cover art began with issue 29, which had a woodblock image on the cover. The early covers set the standard for lurid and melodramatic images. Competition was fierce with regard to cover art and increased dramatically in 1874 when the first color image was used. Dime novels gave way to pulp magazines in the late 1920's, which in turn gave way to mass market paperbacks beginning in the 1950's.

From the guide to the Barry Goldwater Dime Novel Collection, 1881-1920, (Arizona State University Libraries Arizona Collection)

Barry M. Goldwater was born in Phoenix, Arizona on January 1, 1909. He attended grade school in Phoenix and at age 13 succeeded in setting up the first commercial radio transmitter in Arizona, KFDA – the 36th station licensed in the U.S. He attended high school at Staunton Military Academy in Virginia where he became an outstanding cadet and student athlete. He played football, ran track, and was captain of the record-setting swim team. After graduation, he enrolled at the University of Arizona. His academic career was cut short in 1929 by his father's death, whereupon he entered the family business, Goldwaters department store. Starting as a junior clerk, Goldwater progressed to become President and eventually Chairman of the Board – a position he held until 1953.

Goldwater married Margaret (Peggy) Johnson of Muncie, Indiana in 1934. They had four children, Joanne, Barry Jr., Michael, and Margaret (Peggy) Jr. Peggy died in 1985. In 1992, he married Susan Wechsler.

In 1940, Goldwater joined Norman Nevills on a 42-day trip down the Green and Colorado Rivers and became the 71st person to travel the full length of the Colorado. His film, photographs, slides, and lecture Shooting the Rapids took him to venues throughout Arizona. He drew large audiences, thus setting the stage for future political campaigns. His award-winning photography was exhibited worldwide and won him membership in the prestigious Royal Photographic Society.

Barry Goldwater's military career spanned 37 years. During World War II, he volunteered for active duty in 1942 but was rejected due to his age and previous athletic injuries. He persisted and eventually was assigned to Yuma, Arizona where he was a gunnery instructor and perfected a technique that increased target accuracy. He later became one of 10 pilots to fly P-47 Thunderbolts across the North Atlantic to Europe. He retired in 1969 as a Major General in the U.S. Air Force Reserves. By the end of his career, he had logged 15,000 hours of flight time, flew over 250 aircraft, and received numerous awards, medals, and commendations.

Goldwater launched his political career in 1949 on a Republican reform platform and won a seat on the Phoenix City Council. In 1952, Barry Goldwater challenged the incumbent Ernest McFarland and won a seat in the U.S. Senate. He served two terms and then ran for President against Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. Although it was a landslide defeat, Goldwater emerged as a political icon for the conservative movement and the Republican Party. He was re-elected to the Senate in 1968 and served until his retirement in 1986. During his thirty-year career, he served on the Banking and Currency, Labor and Public Welfare, Interior and Insular Affairs, Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Armed Forces, Labor and Public Welfare, Select Committee on Intelligence, Indian Affairs, and Commerce, Science and Transportation and Small Business committees. These committees reflect his lifelong interests in aviation, amateur radio, technology, defense, labor and union issues, national security, and Native Americans.

On May 29, 1998, Barry M. Goldwater died at his home in Phoenix from complications of a stroke.

  • 1909: January 1, Baron (Barry) Morris Goldwater is born at home to Baron Goldwater and Josephine (JoJo) Williams Goldwater in Phoenix, Arizona. He is later joined by brother Robert and sister Carolyn.
  • 1912: Arizona becomes the 48th state in the union on February 14th. Young Barry is the ring bearer at the first wedding performed in the State of Arizona. The couple, Joe Melczer and Hazel Goldberg, delayed their wedding until they received word that Arizona had become a state.
  • 1920: His father gives him his first crystal radio set sparking a lifelong interest in ham radio.
  • 1922: At age 13, assists in setting up the first commercial radio transmitter in Arizona, KFDA. It is the 36th station licensed in the United States.
  • 1923 - 1928 : Attends Staunton Military Academy in Virginia. Plays center in football, runs track and is the captain of the swim team. Named Outstanding Cadet of the senior class.
  • 1928: Applies for a commission as Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Attends the University of Arizona the fall semester of that year.
  • 1929: Baron Goldwater dies at age 62. Barry leaves the university to assume his position in the family department store, Goldwaters, while brother Bob finishes college at Stanford.
  • 1930: Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve. Registers for the first time as a Republican. Takes flight lessons and makes his first solo flight after 10 hours of instruction. Flying becomes a life long passion. Meets Peggy Johnson, daughter of industrialist R. P. Johnson, in December of that year.
  • 1931: Makes his first cross country flight to Los Angeles. During his lifetime, clocks 15,000 hours of flight time in 270 different types of aircraft including helicopters, sail planes and gliders.
  • 1933: Promoted to First Lieutenant in the U.S. Infantry Reserve. Proposes marriage to Peggy Johnson.
  • 1934: Barry Goldwater and Peggy Johnson marry in her hometown of Muncie, Indiana.
  • 1935: Enters his first photographic art exhibit at The First Annual Salon of The Arizona Pictorialists. Becomes a serious photographer exhibiting in over 200 juried shows nationally and internationally.
  • 1936: First child, Joanne is born. Organizes winter relief flights to the Navajo Nation.
  • 1937: Serves as General Chairman of the Phoenix Community Chest drive.
  • 1938: Second child, Barry Jr. is born.
  • 1939: Creates a national fad with Antsy Pants, men's underwear printed with large red ants. Women's Wear Daily describes him as a creative merchandising dynamo. Sells first photograph Coalmine Canyon to Arizona Highways.
  • 1940: Publishes Arizona Portraits resulting in his induction into the Royal Photographic Society. Joins the Norman Nevills party on a trip down the Green and Colorado Rivers and for 42 days runs the rapids in a wooden boat. Becomes the 71st known person to travel the full length of the Colorado River. Shoots many photographs and a film Shooting the Rapids, which he takes on tour throughout Arizona. Third child, Michael is born.
  • 1941: The Goldwater stores expand. The family business yields $1,000,000 annually. Becomes Chairman of the Military Affairs Committee of Phoenix Chamber of Commerce. Assigned as Public Relations Officer to Luke Air Force Base.
  • 1942: Transferred to Yuma, Arizona where he oversees construction and requisitions supplies for an advanced flight school for combat pilots. Serves as an aerial gunnery instructor and perfects a technique that increases target accuracy. Participates in training programs for Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist Chinese pilots. This program begins a life-long relationship with the Republic of China (Taiwan).
  • 1943: Transferred to the 27th Ferry Squadron and is selected as one of the first 10 pilots to ferry P-47 Thunderbolts across the North Atlantic to Europe. Awarded the Air Medal for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.
  • 1944: Serves in the Asian Theatre and flies three major supply routes, Snowball, Crescent and Fireball. Assigned to fly The Hump (the eastern end of the Himalayan Mountains), the last leg of a ten-thousand mile run. Promoted to Major and then Lt. Colonel. Fourth child, Peggy Jr. is born.
  • 1945: Musters out of the U.S. Army Air Corps.
  • 1946: Assigned by Arizona Governor Sydney Osborn as Captain of the Arizona National Guard. Advocates integration of the Arizona Guard, which was among the first to open its ranks to African-Americans.
  • 1946: Campaigns for Arizona to become a Right to Work state in response to major strikes nationally. Appointed by Governor Sydney Osborn to the Arizona Colorado River Commission later renamed the Interstate Stream Commission. One of his photographs is selected for the cover of the first all color issue of Arizona Highways.
  • 1947: Joins the Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Thunderbirds. Promotes legislation for the Right to Work initiative. Phoenix Mayor Ray Busey appoints Barry Goldwater and 39 other leading citizens to a committee to study city government and suggest charter revisions and reforms. They become known as the Phoenix Forty.
  • 1948: The Phoenix Charter Revision Committee announces its finding and recommends the appointment of a professional city manager who would be immune from political pressure. Asked by supporters to run for City Council.
  • 1949: The Phoenix Charter Revision Committee reorganizes to become the Charter Government Committee, which provides a platform for reform-minded candidates who sweep the election. At age 40, wins a seat on the Phoenix City Council.
  • 1950: Becomes Howard Pyle's campaign manager for Governor of Arizona.
  • 1951: Re-elected to Phoenix City Council.
  • 1952: Opens his campaign for U.S. Senate. Becomes Chief of Staff for the Arizona Air National Guard. Unseats Democrat incumbent Ernest McFarland by 6,500 votes.
  • 1953: Gives first major speech in Senate and appeals for an end to federal price controls. In another debate, he criticizes France for its failure to move Indo-China towards independence.
  • 1954: The Senator's first bill is signed by President Eisenhower. The bill authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain land to the City of Tucson, Arizona and to accept certain other lands in exchange.
  • 1955: Asked to serve as Chair of the Republican Senate Campaign Committee. This launches his GOP leadership role as a national fundraiser and spokesman for emerging conservative beliefs.
  • 1956: Collaborates with Stephen Shadegg on the script for the documentary For Freedom's Sake describing the dangers of communism. Campaigns to re-elect President Eisenhower to a second term.
  • 1958: Wins a second term to the U.S. Senate over Arizona Governor Ernest McFarland by a 56% majority.
  • 1959: Promoted to Brigadier General of the U.S. Air Force Reserves. Meets with Clarence Manion and a small group of conservatives in Chicago to discuss a national campaign to mobilize sentiment and delegate votes for the GOP presidential nomination. Establishes the Arizona Historical Foundation.
  • 1960: Nominated by Arizona Governor Paul Fannin for President at the GOP National Convention. Arizona U.S. Congressman John Rhodes seconds the motion. Goldwater immediately withdraws his name and campaigns for Richard M. Nixon. Writes The Conscience of a Conservative. It becomes a best-seller, emphasizing his strong opposition to communism and fueling growth of the conservative political movement.
  • 1961: President Kennedy asks Goldwater's advice during the Bay of Pigs invasion. He responds by advising him to order an air strike immediately or the mission would fail. Receives an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Arizona State University.
  • 1962: The Bay of Pigs debacle precipitates the Cuban Missile Crisis. This prompts Goldwater to write Why Not Victory, which quickly becomes a bestseller and offers a foreign policy based on military strength. Promoted to Major General of the U.S. Air Force Reserves.
  • 1963: Objects to the public accommodations section of the Civil Rights bill as an assault on property and states' rights. Already considering a run for the presidency, discusses a plan with John F. Kennedy to travel the country and campaign together. J.F.K is assassinated. Vice-President Lyndon Baines Johnson becomes the 36th President of the United States. Obtains HAM radio license for station K7UGA which is based out of his home.
  • 1964: Publishes two books, Where I Stand and The Face of Arizona. Wins the Republican nomination for President. One much quoted line in his acceptance speech, written by Harry Jaffa, I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice and let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue has its origins in a speech by Cicero. Meets with President Johnson. Both agree to remain mute on the Civil Rights issue and maintain a united front against communism. Defeated by Lyndon Baines Johnson in a landslide.
  • 1964: Goldwater v. Ginzburg - sues Fact Magazine, Inc. and Ralph Ginzburg for libel regarding the article The Unconscious of a Conservative: A Special Issue on the Mind of Barry Goldwater, which labeled him as severely paranoid personality who was unfit for office. Court rules in Goldwater's favor in 1970.
  • 1965: Settles back to his home Be-Nun-I-Kin in Phoenix, Arizona. He and his former presidential campaign manager, Denison Kitchel, create the Free Society Association. Becomes active in local issues such as the preservation of Camelback Mountain. Continues to make numerous public appearances and receives thousands of letters from supporters and fans. Makes plans to run for the U.S. Senate.
  • 1967: K7UGA approved to operate as part of the Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) which is staffed by volunteers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. By 1983 when the station closed, over 200,000 phone calls were patched from troops in Southeast Asia to family members in the U.S. Makes first visit to Taiwan.
  • 1968: Supports Richard M. Nixon for the GOP presidential bid. Runs for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the retiring Carl Hayden and defeats Roy Elson 274,607 to 205,338 votes. First order of business: a trip to Vietnam. Son, Barry Jr. wins a seat to the U.S House of Representatives from the 27th District of California in a campaign headed by his brother Michael.
  • 1969: Introduces a joint resolution endorsing the Equal Rights Amendment. Receives an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Arizona. Retires from the Armed Forces of the U.S. as a Major General. Medals and decorations include: the China Defense and Battle Star, Asiatic Pacific Theatre, American Theatre, American Defense Medal, European Theatre, Army Commendations Medal, Reserve Officers' Medal, Air Medal, and the China Hump Pilots Medal.
  • 1970: Publishes Conscience of a Majority and a book highlighting his river trip in 1940, Delightful Journey, Down the Green and Colorado Rivers. Authors the Overseas and Absentee Voting Rights Amendment and the National Air and Space Museum bills. Secures voting rights for all citizens age eighteen and older.
  • 1971: Growing anti-ERA sentiments in Arizona and nationally persuade him to reject the amendment. Leads the effort to repeal the draft and establish an all volunteer military force.
  • 1972: Watergate begins and is initially minimized by Goldwater. At age 65, thinks about retiring. President Nixon is re-elected.
  • 1973: Receives the Wright Brothers Award for service in aviation.
  • 1974: Watergate evidence mounts. He, Hugh Scott, and John Rhodes meet with President Nixon who resigns from office two days later. Vice-President Gerald Ford becomes the 38th President of the U.S. Goldwater runs for another term in the U.S. Senate and defeats Jonathan Marshall 320,306 to 229,523 votes. Authors the Grand Canyon Park Enlargement bill. Presented with the Aviation Space Writers Distinguished Service Award. Wins the Lee Badge as a sail plane pilot.
  • 1975: Receives an Honorary Doctor of Aeronautical Science degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Butler University. Receives the Congressional Award for Outstanding Service for Veterans of Foreign Wars.
  • 1976: Receives Congressional Award for AMVETS of World War II. Publishes The Coming Breakpoint. Inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame. Jimmy Carter becomes the 39th President of the United States.
  • 1977: Authors the Women Pilots Veterans' Benefits bill conferring veterans' status on Women Air Force Service Pilots. Appointed to Smithsonian Institution Board of Regents.
  • 1978: Visits Panama and meets with General Omar Torrijos. Files a lawsuit, Goldwater v. Carter, for terminating a treaty without Senate consent. Lawsuit found in favor of the President of the U.S. in 1979. Receives an Honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Northern Arizona University. Awarded the Elder Statesman Award from the National Aeronautic Association, and the Thomas D. White National Defense Award from the U.S. Air Force Academy.
  • 1979: Publishes his personal and political memoirs, With No Apologies.
  • 1980: Decides to run a final time for the Senate and narrowly defeats Democrat William Schulz 432,371 to 422,972 votes.
  • 1981: Supports the nomination of Sandra Day O'Connor as the first woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • 1982: Joins liberals in attacking the New Right's efforts to legislate limits on the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. Inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame.
  • 1984: Authors the Cable Deregulation Act.
  • 1985: Peggy Goldwater dies after a long struggle with lung and heart failure.
  • 1986: Co-authors Goldwater–Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act, which creates a strong Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, making the holder of the post the principal military adviser to the President. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Retires from the U.S. Senate. U.S. Representative John McCain wins the vacated seat.
  • 1988: Remains active in local and national politics. Continues to be in high demand as a speaker. Receives thousands of letters from friends, fans, and supporters. Becomes the Honorary Chair of the campaign to recall Governor Evan Mecham. Endorses George H. W. Bush over Robert Dole. Makes public service announcements to preserve ancient Native American sites from plunder. A total of 196 Goldwater photographs have now appeared in Arizona Highways.
  • 1991: Inducted into the Arizona Aviation Hall of Fame
  • 1992: Marries Susan Shaffer Wechsler, a registered nurse and branch manager of a home health care agency. Endorses Democrat Karan English for the U.S. House of Representatives over Republican Douglas Wead. Speaks out against mixing religion and politics and for separation of church and state.
  • 1993: Endorses a referendum making the birthday of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. a state holiday in contrast to his previous positions rejecting an MLK national holiday. Urges the Phoenix City Council to adopt a civil rights ordinance that would protect homosexuals from discrimination. States his position that gays be allowed to serve in the military.
  • 1994: Honored by Planned Parenthood for his commitment to privacy and a woman's right to choose. Receives the Civil Libertarian of the Year Award from the Arizona Civil Liberties Union.
  • 1996: Describes himself and Bob Dole as the new liberals of the Republican Party. Suffers his first stroke. Dole loses the presidential primary to Steve Forbes.
  • 1998: May 29, Barry M. Goldwater dies at home due to complications of a stroke. He is later cremated. Both Barry and his wife Peggy's ashes are scattered along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

From the guide to the Personal and Political Papers of Senator Barry M. Goldwater, 1880s-2008, (Arizona State University Libraries Arizona Collection)

Politician, ham radio operator, western art collector, aviator, and master photographer Barry Goldwater was an avid collector of Western Americana including the historic photographs in this collection. He loved the topography and romance of the West and sought to collect images to represent this ideal. Though considered a hobby, his collecting also served the greater purpose of documenting the history of Arizona. Goldwater even went so far as to place newspaper ads requesting those with historic photographs and ephemera to contact him for a possible donation or sale. He also opened his home to students and researchers interested in viewing his collection. Now publicly available, this collection along with his fine art photographs depicts an Arizona rarely seen.

To attempt to show adequately the beauties of Arizona, either by pictures or by words, has always seemed to me a task too great for man. Neither the lens nor the written word can show the history or the romance that adds so much to the beauties with which this state has been endowed. Barry M. Goldwater, Arizona Portraits (1940).

From the guide to the Barry M. Goldwater Historic Photograph Collection, 1850s-1960s, (Arizona State University Libraries Arizona Collection)

Barry M. Goldwater's interest in photography began in 1934 when his wife Peggy gave him a 2¼ inch redflex camera for Christmas. The Goldwater family had been in Arizona since the mid 19th century and had established themselves as both businessmen and devoted civil servants. Barry Goldwater's interest in the people and places of Arizona ran deep and he decided to build his own historical record of the state. He carried a camera with him everywhere he went and took 15,000 photographs (over 25 miles of film) over the next 30 years.

Instructed by local photographer Tom Bate and inspired by Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, Goldwater developed a talent for photography that would be recognized worldwide. Since 1935, his photographs have been featured in approximately 250 shows. He was admitted as an associate member of the Royal Photographic Society and was a lifetime member of the Photographic Society of America. Goldwater frequently contributed to Arizona Highways and published over ten books featuring his photographs, including Arizona Portraits (1940), The Face of Arizona (1964), and Delightful Journey (1970).

My photography has taken me over, literally, every mile of the southwest, over both poles and every major country on the globe. But it is to Arizona that I turn for my inspiration and what I think has been my best work. It is my desire to share with future generations the Southwest that I love. Barry M. Goldwater, Barry Goldwater and the Southwest (1976).

From the guide to the Barry M. Goldwater Fine Arts Photograph Collection, circa 1938–1968, 1940-1965, (Arizona State University Libraries Arizona Collection)

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Subjects:

  • Legislators--Interviews
  • States' rights (American politics)
  • Political consultants
  • Radio advertising
  • Coal mines and mining
  • Petroleum conservation
  • Agriculture--Photographs
  • Campaign paraphernalia
  • Advertising, political
  • Cowboys--Photographs
  • Church and state
  • Abortion
  • Indians of North America
  • Buildings--Photographs
  • Cable television--Deregulation
  • Borderlands
  • Presidents--Election--1960
  • Indians of North America--Photographs
  • Political elections
  • Free enterprise
  • Presidents--Election--1964
  • Transportation--Photographs
  • Open and closed shop
  • Presidential candidates
  • Solar energy
  • Military service, Voluntary
  • Veterans
  • Telecommunication
  • Conservatism
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975
  • Military readiness
  • Gun control
  • Navajo Indians--Photographs
  • Kachinas in art
  • Aeronautics
  • Nominations for office
  • Photography
  • Civil rights
  • Television advertising
  • Amateur radio stations
  • Wilderness areas
  • Medicare
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Political cartoons
  • Political conventions
  • Supersonic transport planes
  • Labor unions--Political activity
  • Emigration and immigration
  • Indians of North America--Slides
  • Firearms--Law and legislation
  • Nuclear energy
  • Elections
  • Petroleum reserves
  • Ecology
  • Politicians
  • Unidentified flying objects
  • Energy industries
  • Indian artists--Photographs
  • Deserts--Photographs
  • Gay military personnel
  • National security
  • Rodeos--Photographs
  • Desert plants--Photographs
  • Watergate Affair, 1972-1974
  • Indian artists--Portraits
  • Indians of North America--Portraits
  • Privacy, Right of
  • Mines and mineral resources--Photographs

Occupations:

  • Collector

Places:

  • Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico) (as recorded)
  • Green River Region (Wyo.-Utah) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Southwest, New (as recorded)
  • Fort Grant (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Grand Canyon (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Southwest, New (as recorded)
  • Idaho (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Phoenix (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Arizona--Phoenix (as recorded)
  • Colorado River Region (Colo.-Mexico) (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Panama Canal (Panama) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Fort Apache (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Green River (Wyo.-Utah) (as recorded)
  • Grand Canyon (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Monument Valley (Ariz. and Utah) (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Grand Canyon (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico) (as recorded)
  • West (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • Taiwan (as recorded)
  • Theodore Roosevelt Dam (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Grand Canyon (Ariz.) (as recorded)
  • Monument Valley (Ariz. and Utah) (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Arizona (as recorded)
  • Southwest, New (as recorded)