Johnston, Joseph E. (Joseph Eggleston), 1807-1891

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1807-02-03
Death 1891-03-21

Biographical notes:

Confederate general.

From the description of Letter (copy), 1861 Sept. 11 : Manassas, Va., to G.T. Beauregard. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122489351

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Selma [Alabama], to Colonel Blanton Duncan, 1867 Jan. 2. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270489683

From the description of Letter, October 9, 1861. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 443082432

Benjamin Stoddert Ewell was born in Georgetown, D. C., 10 June 1810, the son of Thomas Ewell and Elizabeth Stoddert. He graduated from United States Military Academy and taught there. He taught at Hampden- Sydney College and at Washington College (now Washington and Lee University). In 1848, he was elected professor of mathematics and acting president of College of William and Mary and in 1854, became president. He was colonel of 32nd Virginia Infantry Regiment and later assistant adjutant-general to Joseph E. Johnston. He was president of William and Mary 1854-1888 and died 1894. He was the brother of Richard Stoddert Ewell, had another brother, William Stoddert, a sister Elizabeth S. Ewell and a daughter Elizabeth S. Ewell Scott.

From the guide to the Benjamin Stoddert Ewell Papers, 1784-1934., (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

Confederate army officer and U.S. representative from Virginia.

From the description of Papers of Joseph E. Johnston, 1861-circa 1963. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79423703

Joseph Eggleston Johnston, Confederate General. In May he assumed the command of the Confederate forces at Harpers Ferry. In Spring 1862, he commanded the Confederate forces defending the Yorktown Peninsula. In Nov. 1862, he was assigned to command of the Department of the West, and in Dec. 1863, the Army of the Tennessee. He capitulated to Sherman on Apr. 26, 1865. After the war Johnston represented Richmond, Va. in the House of Representatives, and was federal commissioner of railroads.

From the description of Papers of Joseph E. Johnston, 1841-1873 (bulk 1861-1865). (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122565063

Confederate general, resident of Prince Edward County, Va.

From the description of Papers, 1855-1885. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 19851746

Joseph E. Johnston was born in Prince Edward County, Va. on 3 February 1807. He graduated from the United States Military Academy and served in the Mexican War. He was an officer in the United States Army until resigning to join the Confederate States Army. After the Civil War, Johnston engaged in the insurance business, wrote articles and a book, served in the United States House of Representatives and as commissioner of railroads. He died 21 March 1891.

From the description of Papers, 1825-1891. (College of William & Mary). WorldCat record id: 22577993

Joseph E. Johnston was a Confederate general.

From the description of Confederate States Army collection general order, 1864. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 122588313

William T. Sherman was a General in the Union Army during the Civil War. Joseph E. Johnston, a Confederate General, surrendered his command to Sherman in North Carolina, 1865.

From the description of Confederate States Army Civil War orders, 1865. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 86142708

Confederate brigadier general; 1861, commander of the Department of Northern Virginia.

From the description of Papers, 1861-[ca. 1866]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70973969

Confederate general and first cousin of Valentine Wood Southall of Charlottesville, Va., [1793-1861], the father of the recipient Mary Martha Southall Brown, later Venable.

From the description of Letter to Mary S. Brown [manuscript], 1871 March 17. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647975941

Joseph E. Johnston, U. S. military officer and Confederate general, was acting inspector-general at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas for the Utah expedition of 1858.

During this period Fort Leavenworth was the main depot and cavalry supply station for military posts in the West.

From the description of Letter : Fort Leavenworth, to Adjutant General of the Utah forces, 1858 July 4. (Newberry Library). WorldCat record id: 38142241

Joseph E. Johnston was born Feb. 3, 1807 near Farmville, Va. He was a Confederate general who never suffered a direct defeat during the American Civil War (1861-1865). His military effectiveness, though, was hindered by a long-standing feud with Jefferson Davis. When the Peninsular Campaign began in April 1862, Johnston withdrew to defend the capital at Richmond. Although objecting to the strategy prescribed by Davis, he fought well against the Union forces. Severely wounded at the Battle of Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) in May, he was replaced by General Robert E. Lee. He died on March 21, 1891 in Washington, D.C. Britannica Online Encyclopedia http://search.eb.com (Retrieved November 18, 2008)

Howell Cobb was born Spetember 7, 1815 in Jefferson County, Georgia. He was a Georgia politician who championed Southern unionism during the 1850s but then advocated immediate secession following the election of Abraham Lincoln. Cobb served in Congress from 1842 to 1851 and agina from 1855 to 1857; he supported the annexation of Texas, the war with Mexico, and the extension of slavery into the territories. But he broke with the most extreme proslavery Southerners when he advocated extending the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific, opposed the creation of a sectional political party, and supported the Compromise of 1850. He died in New York City on October 9, 1868. Britannica Online Encyclopedia http://search.eb.com (Retrieved November 18, 2008)

From the description of Joseph E. Johnston telegram, 1865, 27 March. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 300050802

Robert William Hughes was born at Muddy Creek Plantation, Powhatan County, Va. in 1821. His parents died in 1822 and he was raised by Edward C. Carrington and Eliza Preston Carrington. He attended Caldwell Institute, Greensboro, N. C. and studied law in Fincastle, Va. He married Eliza M. Johnston, niece of Joseph E. Johnston and the adopted daughter and niece of John B. Floyd. Hughes' son was Robert Morton Hughes. Robert William Hughes was a newspaper editor and federal district attorney. Involved in post Civil War Republican Party politics, he was nominated for governor of Virginia and for Congress but did not win. He was appointed judge of the federal court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

  • 16 Jan. 1821: Born at Muddy Creek Plantation, Powhatan Co., Va.,the son of Jesse and Elizabeth Woodson (Morton) Hughes.
  • 1822: Both parents died, and Hugheswas raised by Gen. Edward C. Carringtonand his wife, Eliza(Preston) Carringtonof Halifax Co., Va.(family relationship not known).
  • Ca. 1833 - 1837 : "put to the carpenter's trade in Princeton, N.J."
  • Ca. 1837 - 1838 : Attended Caldwell Institute,Greensboro, N.C.
  • Ca. 1839: Tutor, Bingham High School,Hillsboro, N.C.
  • 1843: Studied law, Fincastle, Va.
  • 1846: Began practice of law, Richmond, Va.
  • 4 June 1850: Married Eliza M. Johnston,(1825-1908), niece of Gen. Joseph E. Johnstonand niece and adopted daughter of John Buchananand Sarah (Preston) Floyd.
  • 1850: Began writing editorials for the Richmond Examiner.
  • 1853 - 1857 : Editor of the Richmond Examinerwhile regular editor in Europe.
  • 1855: Birth of son, Robert Morton Hughes.
  • 1857 - 1861 : Editor of the Washington Union,and lived in home of Secretary of War John Buchanan Floyd.
  • 1861: Birth of son, Floyd Hughes(2 other children died young)
  • 1861: Because of "chronic disease" retired to a farm near Abingdon, Va.,where General and Mrs. Floyd1ived with the Hughes family.
  • 1861 - 1864 : Wrote for the Richmond Examiner,showing hostility toward Jefferson Davis' administration.
  • 1865 - 1866 : Edited the Richmond Republic,and generally pursued a course that considered "nimble"
  • 1868: Delegate to National Democratic Convention.
  • 1869 - 1870 : Editor of the Richmond State Journal.
  • Ca. 1870: Wounded William E. Cameronin a duel.
  • 1872: Named federal district attorney by Grant administration.
  • 1872: Nominated for Congressbut did not win.
  • 1873: Nominated for Governor of Virginiabut did not win.
  • 1874: Named Judge of federal court for the Eastern District of Va.
  • 1898: Resigned judgeship.
  • 1901: Died at Abingdon, Va.

Dictionary of American Biography

From the guide to the Inventory of the Robert William Hughes Papers, 1818-1900, (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

Robert Morton Hughes, an alumnus of the College of William and Mary, attended the University of Virginia Law School. He was the son of Robert William and Eliza M. (Johnston) Hughes. He practiced law in Norfolk, Virginia. Hughes was the president of the Virginia Bar Association; biographer of Joseph Eggleston Johnston; a member of the Virginia Board of Education; and served as a member and as rector of the Board of Visitors of the College of William and Mary.

  • 1855: Born, in Abingdon, Virginia,the son of Robert William and Eliza M. [Johnston] Hughes
  • 1870 - 1873 : Attended College of William and Mary,A.B.
  • 1877: M.A., University of Virginia
  • 1877: Began law practice in Norfolk
  • 1879: Married Mattie Smithof Williamsburg(two sons)
  • 1893 - 1918 : Member of the Board of Visitors of the College of William and Mary,served as Rector
  • 1895: President, Virginia Bar Association
  • 1930 - 1935 : Member, Virginia State Board of Education
  • 1940: Died in Norfolk, Virginia

From the guide to the Robert Morton Hughes Papers, 1715-1933., (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

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Subjects:

  • Atlanta Campaign, 1864
  • Lawyers--Virginia--Correspondence
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Railroads--Virginia
  • Harbors--United States
  • Generals--Correspondence
  • Utah Expedition (1857-1858)--Sources
  • Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )
  • Autographs
  • Presidents--Correspondence
  • Bull Run, 1st Battle of, Va., 1861
  • Military bases--History--19th century--Sources
  • United States--Politics and government--1865-1900
  • Books
  • Military pensions
  • Practice of law--Virginia--History
  • Utah Expedition, 1857-1858
  • Military roads
  • Lawyers--Virginia--Norfolk
  • Civil war
  • Horses--Virginia
  • Canals--United States
  • Manuscripts, American
  • Virginia--Politics and government--1865-1950
  • Generals--Archives
  • Railroads--Maintenance and repair

Occupations:

  • Soldiers--United States
  • Practice of law--Virginia--History
  • Army officers
  • Generals--Confederate States of America
  • Representatives, U.S. Congress--Virginia
  • Lawyers--Virginia--Correspondence

Places:

  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Pennsylvania (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Topeka (Kan.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Centreville (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Tennessee (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Washington (D.C.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • North Carolina (as recorded)
  • Kansas--Fort Leavenworth (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • San Antonio (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Mississippi (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • Vicksburg (Miss.) (as recorded)