Auster, Paul, 1947-....

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1947-02-03
Americans
English, French

Biographical notes:

Paul Auster (b. 1947) is a Brooklyn-based novelist, screenplay writer, poet, essayist and translator.

From the description of Paul Auster collection of papers, 1999-2006 2000-2005. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 770725385

From the guide to the Paul Auster Papers, 1963-1995, 1972-mid-1995, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

From the guide to the Paul Auster collection of papers, 1999-2006, 2000-2005, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

From the guide to the Paul Auster collection of papers, 1987-2001, 1995-1999, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

The National Story project began in 1999 after American author, Paul Auster, read a selection from his novel Timbuktu on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered. Auster was asked to return to the program by its then host, Daniel Zwerdling, to perform another reading at a future date. Auster answered with the conditional response that he would be willing to return, but only if he could read other people's stories and not just his own.

The National Story Project began taking submissions from listeners in 1999 October through both e-mail and mail. The guidelines for the stories were that they had to be no more than three pages in length and that the submissions relayed a true event. The selected stories would then be edited or rewritten, if needed, by Auster and his team. The National Story Project aired on Weekend All Things Considered the first Saturday of each month from 1999 November until 2001 July and during that time received over 5,000 submissions from all over the United States on a wide variety of topics and from people of varying ages, gender and backgrounds.

After the National Story Project ended, Auster selected his favorite submissions and compiled them for a book entitled I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story Project. The collection was published in 2002 by Picador, a Macmillan Publishing imprint.

From the description of National Story Project records 1998-2002. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 732604653

BIOGHIST REQUIRED The National Story project began in 1999 after American author, Paul Auster, read a selection from his novel Timbuktu on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered. Auster was asked to return to the program by its then host, Daniel Zwerdling, to perform another reading at a future date. Auster answered with the conditional response that he would be willing to return, but only if he could read other people's stories and not just his own.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED The National Story Project began taking submissions from listeners in 1999 October through both e-mail and mail. The guidelines for the stories were that they had to be no more than three pages in length and that the submissions relayed a true event. The selected stories would then be edited or rewritten, if needed, by Auster and his team. The National Story Project aired on Weekend All Things Considered the first Saturday of each month from 1999 November until 2001 July and during that time received over 5,000 submissions from all over the United States on a wide variety of topics and from people of varying ages, gender and backgrounds.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED After the National Story Project ended, Auster selected his favorite submissions and compiled them for a book entitled I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story Project. The collection was published in 2002 by Picador, a Macmillan Publishing imprint.

From the guide to the National Story Project Records, 1998-2002., (Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6jd50fn
Ark ID:
w6jd50fn
SNAC ID:
43803273

Subjects:

  • Ciegos--Libros y lectura
  • Storytelling
  • Motion picture plays
  • Fantasy baseball (game)
  • Oral History

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)