Small, John Kunkel, 1869-1938

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1869
Death 1938
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

John Kunkel Small (1869-1938), taxonomist, botanical explorer, author of 15 floras, 2057 genera, species and binomials, numerous field guides and more than 400 journal articles served the New York Botanical Garden from 1898 until his death in 1938. He was Curator of the Museums and Herbarium from 1898-1906, Head Curator from 1906-1934 and Chief Research Associate and Head Curator from 1934 until 1938. His early warnings on the ecology of Florida were the impetus for Everglades National Park. He worked with Thomas A. (Thomas Alva) Edison towards developing a synthetic rubber from Solidago.

From the description of John Kunkel Small records 1892-1938. (New York Botanical Garden). WorldCat record id: 41829557

From the description of John Kunkel Small records, 1892-1938. (New York State Historical Documents). WorldCat record id: 155483604

John Kunkel Small was renowned for his research on the flora of southeastern United States and concentrated his efforts on the study of the flowers, bulbs, and herbs of Florida. His writings on botanical subjects included more than 450 books and papers.

After receiving his doctorate from Columbia University, Small became the curator of the herbarium of Columbia University. His doctoral thesis, Flora of the Southeastern United States, was described as the most sumptuous American botanical thesis ever published and won him a reputation as one of the foremost taxonomic botanists of the world. In 1898, he became curator of the newly founded New York Botanical Garden, where he devoted his life's work.

Small traveled to Florida for the first time in 1901. He explored and photographed the forests of tropical hardwood trees and the interesting variety of tropical plants scattered throughout the state. Through the patronage of Charles Deering, whose father helped found the International Harvester Corporation, Small continued his Florida research for the next thirty-six years. His book, From Eden to Sahara - Florida's Tragedy, received acclaim in 1929 for documenting the destruction of Florida's natural environment.

From the description of Papers and photographs, 1902-1938. (Florida State Archive). WorldCat record id: 32413076

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http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6j96wqb
Ark ID:
w6j96wqb
SNAC ID:
58241372

Subjects:

  • Opuntia--Identification
  • cactus
  • Ferns
  • Indians of North America
  • Compositae--Pictorial works
  • Botanists
  • Botany
  • Climbing plants
  • Louisiana Irises--Culture
  • Louisiana irises--Pictorial Works
  • Palms
  • Naturalists
  • Goldenrods--Economic aspects
  • Botany--Classification
  • Ferns--Classification
  • Seminole Indians
  • Cycads
  • Convolvulaceae
  • Agriculture
  • Louisiana irises

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Pennsylvania--Lancaster County (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • North America (as recorded)
  • East (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • South Atlantic States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Northeastern States (as recorded)
  • East (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • West Indies (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Everglades National Park (Fla.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Pennsylvania--Lancaster County (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • West Indies (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • South Atlantic States (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • North America (as recorded)
  • Northeastern States (as recorded)