Fry, Elizabeth Gurney, 1780-1845

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1780-05-21
Death 1845-10-13
Britons
English

Biographical notes:

Elizabeth Fry was a philanthropist and prison reformer.

From the description of Letter [manuscript]. 1838. (Libraries Australia). WorldCat record id: 225718240

Elizabeth Gurney Fry, English penal reformer and philanthropist.

From the description of Elizabeth Gurney Fry manuscript material : 4 items, 1817-1830 (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 226237390

Fry was a prison reformer in England.

From the description of Letter, n.d. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232007284

British prison reformer.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Stamford Hill [London], to Lady Teignmouth, 1821 Oct. 27. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270870844

English Quaker and philanthropist.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Upton Lane, 1844? Jul. 13. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270753014

Prison reformer, Quaker minister.

From the description of Letter, 1841 Sept. 23. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 24560922

Fry, an English Quaker minister, was active in prison reform.

From the description of ALS, [18--?], to the Duchess of Sutherland / Elizth Fry. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 38853798

English Quaker, prison reformer and philanthropist.

From the description of Papers, 1821-1842. (Duke University). WorldCat record id: 35073411

For some years Elizabeth Fry had been concerned about the plight of female convicts sentenced to transportation to New South Wales. Through her efforts the organization of the transports and the conditions that the convicts met on their arrival in New South Wales were gradually improving. In this letter, however, her judgment is misplaced. James Hall, the surgeon whom she recommends, was assaulted by female prisoners in December 1823 when the convict ship, the Brothers, had been at sea for a week. In a celebrated series of court actions between the officers of the ship, James Hall's lack of tact was seen as the primary cause of the trouble. He was not employed again by the convict service.

From the description of Letter, Plashet House [Essex], to Sir T. Byam Martin, 1822 October 22. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 33890797

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ht30hm
Ark ID:
w6ht30hm
SNAC ID:
46888177

Subjects:

  • Prison reformers--Correspondence
  • Women prisoners--History--1815-1866
  • Charities
  • Prisons--History--1815-1866
  • Transportation of convicts
  • Convict ships
  • Women prisoners--Health and hygiene
  • Families
  • Reformatories for women
  • Society of Friends
  • Prisons
  • Slavery and the church--Society of Friends
  • Prison hospitals--History--1815-1866
  • Women prisoners
  • Prison reformers
  • Quakers--Correspondence
  • Quaker women--History--1815-1866

Occupations:

  • Social reformers

Places:

  • Australia--New South Wales (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Germany (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Australia (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Australia--New South Wales (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)