Harris, Frank, 1856-1931

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1855-02-14
Death 1931-08-27
Gender:
Male
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Emma Goldman (1869-1940) was an anarchist, feminist, author, editor, and lecturer on politics, literature and the arts. She was born in Lithuania and died in Canada. Her lectures and publications attracted attention throughout the U.S. and Europe. She was associated with the anarchist journal Mother Earth from 1906 to 1917 and was imprisoned for publicly advocating birth control in 1916 and pacifism in 1917. In 1919 she was deported to Russia but had to leave because of her criticism of the Bolshevik government and was allowed to reenter the U.S. for a lecture tour in 1934.

From the guide to the Emma Goldman papers, 1903-1940, 1919-1940, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Frank Harris was a novelist, editor, playwright, and biographer. He was born in Ireland, raised in America, educated in Europe, and lived most of his life in England. He achieved early success as an editor and went on to produce a large body of diverse writing. A strong and often controversial personality, he is probably best remembered as editor of the Saturday Review.

From the description of Frank Harris letters to Gifford Ernest, 1927-1930. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 71790600

From the description of Frank Harris letter to George S. Viereck, 1924 Sept. 24. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 53808255

British writer and editor.

From the description of Frank Harris Collection, 1888-1955. (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC); University of Texas at Austin). WorldCat record id: 122545934

Frank Harris (1855-1931) was an Irish-born American novelist, biographer, editor, and playwright. He is best known for his controversial autobiography, My Life and Loves. He edited several literary journals including Vanity Fair and Pearson's Magazine.

From the guide to the Frank Harris papers, 1905-1938, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

English writer.

From the description of Letter : New York, to Townley Searle, 1919 June 30. (Boston Athenaeum). WorldCat record id: 316060763

Frank Harris was born in County Galway, Ireland, moving to the United States at age 15. Harris was a novelist, biographer, journalist, editor and playwright, editing several literary journals including Vanity Fair, Saturday Review, and Pearson's Magazine.

From the guide to the Frank Harris papers, 1894-1945., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

See Who was who in America, v.1; Webster's Biographical Dictionary; and Encyclopedia Britannica, 15th edition.

From the guide to the Correspondence and photographs., 1892-1931, (University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library Kansas Collection)

Frank Harris was born James Thomas Harris in Galway, Ireland, February 14, 1856 and emigrated alone to the United States in 1869. After years of study and adventure in America and on the European continent, he returned to London in 1882 and became the editor of the London Evening News in 1883. He edited the Fortnightly Review from 1886-1894, and the Saturday Review from 1894-1898. In his posts at these publications, he became friends (and enemies) with many of the notable figures of fin-de-siècle London, including Oscar Wilde. A difficult personality, Harris struggled with financial stability often after this period, and moved a great deal, living in the south of France and in London in the years before World War I. In 1915, he returned to New York, where he wrote a number of anti-British articles as well as his volumes of Contemporary Portraits. He was the editor of Pearson's Magazine from 1915-1922 and got in many clashes with American censors and others who found him and his work offensive. During this period, he also began dictating his sprawling and sexually explicit memoirs, My Life and Loves, which was published in various forms (expurgated and not) after 1922. In 1923, he settled permanently in Nice, where he died in 1931.

From the description of Frank Harris collection, 1896-1928. (University of California, Los Angeles). WorldCat record id: 591527517

Harris was an Irish-born American novelist, biographer, journalist, editor, and playwright. He edited several literary journals including Vanity Fair, Saturday Review, and Pearson's Magazine.

From the description of Frank Harris papers, 1894-1945. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612198431

American author.

From the description of Papers : of Frank Harris, 1893-1930. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 29734119

Frank Harris (1855-1931) was an Irish-born American novelist, biographer, editor, and playwright.

He is best known for his controversial autobiography, My Life and Loves. He edited several literary journals including Vanity Fair and Pearson's Magazine.

From the description of Frank Harris papers, 1905-1938. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122532665

Biography

Frank Harris was born James Thomas Harris in Galway, Ireland, February 14, 1856. He emigrated alone to the United States in 1869 and after years of study and adventure both in America and on the European continent, he returned to London in 1882. Harris become the editor of the London Evening News in 1883. In 1886, he left the Evening News for a post editing the Fortnightly Review, which he would continue to do until 1894. From 1894 to 1898, he edited the Saturday Review. In his posts at these publications, he became friends (and enemies) with many of the notable figures of fin-de-siècle London, including Oscar Wilde.

A difficult personality, Harris struggled with financial stability often after this period, and moved a great deal, living in the south of France and in London in the years before World War I. In 1915, he returned to New York, where he wrote a number of anti-British articles as well as his volumes of Contemporary Portraits. He was the editor of Pearson's Magazine from 1915-1922 and got into many clashes with American censors and others who found him and his work offensive. During this period, he also began dictating his sprawling and sexually explicit memoirs, My Life and Loves, which was published in various forms (expurgated and not) after 1922.

In 1923, he settled permanently in Nice with his longtime mistress and companion, Nellie O'Hara, who he married in 1927. He died in Nice in 1931.

From the guide to the Frank Harris Collection, 1896-1928, (University of California, Los Angeles. William Andrews Clark Memorial Library)

Frank Harris (1856-1931) was an Irish-American author. Born James Thomas Harris in Galway, Ireland, he ran away at the age of 15 and came to America where he worked at various odd jobs. Eventually he came to Lawrence, Kansas, where two of his brothers had settled, and where he attended the University of Kansas, worked at his brothers' butcher shop, and changed his name to "Frank Harris." In 1875 he embarked on a lengthy tour of Europe, visiting England, Germany, France, Italy, Greece, Austria, Russia, and Ireland, and upon his return to England began writing articles and book reviews. In 1883 he became editor of The Evening News and then in 1886 of the Fortnightly Review . In 1894 he left that position, bought The Saturday Review, and transformed it into a respected literary journal. In addition to his editorial and publishing work he continued to write, producing his first book of short stories in 1895 and another in 1900. Other works of this period include The Bomb (1908), The Women of Shakespeare (1911), and Oscar Wilde (1916).

From 1914-1921 he lived in America; while there, he published two volumes of Contemporary Portraits, edited Pearson's magazine, and became friends with American anarchists Emma Goldman and Thomas Bell. The first volume of his autobiography was published in Berlin in 1922, and in 1923 he settled in Paris, where he wrote two more volumes of Contemporary Portraits, On the Trail: Being My Reminiscences as a Cowboy, and Pantopia (1930), as well as numerous short stories.

Arthur Leonard Ross ( -1975) was an American lawyer, Harris's attorney, and literary executor of the Frank Harris Estate.

From the guide to the Frank Harris and Arthur Leonard Ross Papers, 1895-1973, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

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Subjects:

  • Irish Americans
  • Authors, English
  • Literature--British
  • Authors, American
  • Aliens--Political activity
  • Authors, English--20th century--Biography
  • Communism
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • World War, 1914-1918--Personal narratives
  • American literature--20th century
  • Authors, American--20th century--Correspondence
  • Editors--20th century
  • Authors, American--20th century--Manuscripts
  • Authors, American. Correspondence, reminiscences, etc
  • Censorship
  • Autobiographies
  • Booksellers and bookselling
  • Authors and publishers
  • Émigré
  • Government--Resistance to
  • Prohibited books
  • Manuscripts, American--20th century
  • Authors, English--Correspondence
  • Anarchism
  • Drama--Collections
  • Lawyers
  • Literature--American Fiction

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Anarchists
  • Lawyers
  • Editors

Places:

  • Germany (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)