Bowles, Paul, 1910-1999

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1910-12-30
Death 1999-11-18
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

American expatriate writer and novelist.

From the description of Letter to Bob Sharrard, 1986 December. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 54097458

American expatriate author living in Morocco.

From the description of Papers of Paul Bowles [manuscript], 1957-1984 ca. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821107

American expatriate writer.

From the description of Paul Bowles letter to Bob Sharrard [manuscript], 1987 March 9. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 369173569

Paul Bowles (b. 1910) was an American author and composer of operas, film and stage scores, ballets, songs and chamber music. Bowles studied music with Aaron Copland and Virgil Thomson and began to write at the provocation of Gertrude Stein. Although born in New York, Bowles spent much of his adult life in his adopted home of Morocco. Many of his novels and short stories focus on life in Morocco from the perspective of both natives and foreigners. Bowles also worked as a translator, working on English versions of French, Spanish, Italian and Moroccan originals. He earned numerous grants, awards and fellowships throughout his lifetime, including an American Book Award nomination. Bowles was married to the playwright Jane Auer Bowles (1917-1973). He died on November 18, 1999, in Morocco.

From the description of Papers of Paul Bowles, 1933-1985 (bulk 1967-1985). (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 122443776

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910.

From the description of Paul Bowles papers, 1960-1985. (University of Delaware Library). WorldCat record id: 667211254

Commissioned by the Ballet Caravan, 1936. Composed 1936. First performance (in ballet form) by the Ballet Caravan with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Philadelphia, July 19, 1937, at Robin Hood Dell, Alexander Smallens conducting.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Yankee Clipper ballet / Paul Bowles. [19--?] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 45063223

American writer.

From the description of Papers of Paul Bowles [manuscript], 1931 and 1950. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821117

American author and composer living in Morocco.

From the description of Letters to Brion Gysin [manuscript], 1975-1978. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821100

American composer, author, and translator.

From the description of Paul Bowles Collection, 1897-1995. (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC); University of Texas at Austin). WorldCat record id: 145406479

American writer living in Morocco.

From the description of Papers of Paul Bowles, 1965-1974 [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647827907

From the description of The thicket of spring [manuscript] : poems, 1926-1969, 1971. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647833484

American composer and writer.

From the description of Autograph letters signed (2), dated Tangier, 21 September and 22 October 1990, to Joan Peyser, 1990 Sept. 21. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270992195

American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles (1910-1999), whose best-known fictional work is the novel The Sheltering Sky, is equally known as a prolific translator.

From the description of Paul Bowles letter to Pud Gadiot. 1953 February 10. (University of Delaware Library). WorldCat record id: 419477402

American author and composer.

From the description of Paul Bowles papers, 1940-1988. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 470399749

American author.

From the description of Papers concerning the publication of "Concerto for two pianos, winds and percussion" [manuscript], 1985-1989. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647823167

From the description of Paul Bowles reads a hundred camels in the courtyard [manuscript], 1978. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821065

From the description of Letter to Andrea Brown [manuscript], 1979 October 16. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647820455

From the description of Paul Bowles letters to Mohammed Mrabet, 1966-1972. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 145741231

American composer.

From the description of First Hymn [and Second Hymn]. [1946?] (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270561939

From the description of Typewritten letter signed, dated : Tangier, 4 May 1979, to Michael Judd in Livermore, California, 1979 May 4. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270899903

Paul Frederic Bowles, born December 30, 1910, in New York City, was the only child of Claude Dietz and Rena Winnewisser Bowles. Bowles began writing short stories and composing music as a child, and he was only a teenager when his surrealist poetry was published in the magazine Transition. Bowles briefly attended the University of Virginia but dropped out in 1929 and moved to Paris where he met and became friends with Gertrude Stein. This began over forty years of nearly constant traveling for Bowles, who once said of himself that he was addicted to movement. He returned to the University of Virginia in the spring of 1930, but left again after one semester to study music, first under Aaron Copland in Berlin (1930-32) and then with Virgil Thomson in Paris (1933-34). During these years he also made his first visit, at Stein's suggestion, to Tangier, Morocco. In 1937, Bowles met author and playwright Jane Auer; they were married the following year. The Bowleses eventually settled in Tangier, although both traveled often throughout North Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States. At one point Paul even owned Taprobane, an island off the coast of Sri Lanka.

Paul Bowles became a celebrated composer during the 1940s, providing the musical scores for such noted plays as My Heart's in the Highlands (1940), South Pacific (1943), and The Glass Menagerie (1945). He also composed a number of scores for ballets, including Yankee Clipper. At the same time, Bowles wrote travel books on America, Mexico, France, India, and North Africa. From 1942-45, he worked as a music critic for the New York Herald-Tribune. He made translations from French and Spanish for View, and his translation of Jean-Paul Sartre's Huis Clos was published as No Exit in 1946. After reading his wife's Two Serious Ladies (1943), Bowles was inspired to write fiction. He contributed short stories to Harper's Bazaar, View, Mademoiselle, and Partisan Review. Bowles's first novel, The Sheltering Sky (1949), was a best-seller, and it remains his most critically acclaimed work. Over the next decade, Bowles wrote three more novels and developed a reputation as an existential novelist.

In 1956, he began translating Moroccan literature. In the 1960s and 1970s, Bowles primarily translated Moghrebi novels, short stories, and folk tales in collaboration with Mohammed Mrabet. He also returned to writing poetry. In 1970, he founded the literary magazine Antaeus with Daniel Halpern.

Jane Bowles's mental and physical health deteriorated after she suffered a stroke in 1957, and she spent the final years of her life in a hospital in Spain before dying in 1973. During those years, Paul Bowles ceased to write fiction. In the years since his wife's death, Paul Bowles has remained in Morocco; he received two NEH fellowships and began writing fiction and composing again. Bowles died in Tangier on November 19, 1999. More information about Paul Bowles may be found in his autobiography Without Stopping (Putnam, 1972).

From the guide to the Paul Bowles Collection TXRC99-A15., 1897-1995, (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin)

The American composer and author Paul Frederick Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. Bowles was published at age seventeen, abandoned college, and in 1929 began his life of travels with a trip to Paris, where he hoped to establish himself as a poet. Back in New York in 1930, he studied composition with Aaron Copland, whom he also accompanied to Yaddo, Paris, Berlin, and Tangier. With the support of Copland and Virgil Thomson, Bowles found work in New York writing incidental music and scores for ballet and theater. His successful career as a composer took off during the Depression with work for the Federal Theater Project (including music for Orson Welles's Horse Eats Hat ) and the Federal Music Project. Bowles became one of the preeminent composers of American theater music, producing works for William Saroyan, Tennessee Williams, and others. In the 1990s, a resurgence of interest in Bowles's music spawned a number of major concerts and performances in the United States and Europe. In addition, a new generation of musicians has released several well received recordings of Bowles's compositions.

In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer, who shortly achieved critical acclaim for her first novel, Two Serious Ladies (1943). Inspired by Jane Bowles's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. Beginning in the 1940s, he produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works. Among Bowles's best known fictional works are the novels The Sheltering Sky (1949), Let It Come Down (1952), The Spider's House (1955); and an early short story collection, The Delicate Prey and Other Stories (1950). A 1989 reprint of The Sheltering Sky and Bernardo Bertolucci's 1990 film version of the novel, starring Debra Winger and John Malkovich, revived international interest in Bowles, the writer.

Bowles is equally known as a prolific translator. He bestowed the title "No Exit" upon Jean-Paul Sartre's Huis Clos and his 1946 translation of that play remains the standard version for English language productions. During the 1940s, Bowles translated the poems and stories of a wide variety of European and Latin American authors. Bowles taped and transcribed from the Moghrebi tales by Mohammed Mrabet and several other Moroccan story tellers; and his translations have broadened readership of Guatemalan author Rodrigo Rey Rosa. Bowles has translated several works related to North African culture and geography, and has generously introduced and prefaced photographic collections, travel writing, and stories by other authors who share those interests.

Paul and Jane Bowles spent much of their married life traveling throughout the world and in the late 1940s made Tangier, Morocco, their permanent home. Major figures in the world of letters and the arts and international society frequently visited them there. Jane Bowles died in 1973, and Bowles continued to reside in Tangier until his death on November 18, 1999.

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Lauçanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles collection, 1929-2011, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986 Sawyer-Laucanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer. Inspired by his wife's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. After the 1940s, he produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works.

British writer Nathalie Blondel edited the journals of writer Mary Butts and is the author of Mary Butts : scenes from the life : a biography (McPherson, c1998).

From the guide to the Paul Bowles letters to Nathalie Blondel, 1987–1990, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910.

In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer. Inspired by his wife's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. After the 1940s, he produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works.

Michael Fordyce was a friend of Bowles in Morocco. Fordyce is mentioned in a March 23, 1956, letter written by Paul Bowles to Rena Bowles, which was published in In Touch: the Letters of Paul Bowles .

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Laucanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles letter to Michael Fordyce, circa 1950-1959, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles (1910–1999), whose best-known fictional work is the novel The Sheltering Sky , is equally known as a prolific translator.

Sawyer-Lauçanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles . New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles letter to Pud Gadiot, 1953 February 10, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Laucanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. Before abandoning college at the University of Virginia, Bowles befriended John Widdicombe. The two men corresponded until the 1970s.

In 1929, no longer attending the University of Virginia, Bowles began his life of travels with a trip to Paris, where he hoped to establish himself as a poet. Back in New York in 1930, he studied composition with Aaron Copland, whom he also accompanied to Yaddo, Paris, Berlin, and Tangier. With the support of Copland and Virgil Thomson, Bowles found work in New York writing music and scores for ballet and theater. His successful career as a composer took off in the Depression with work for the Federal Theater Project (including music for Orson Welles's Horse Eats Hat) and the Federal Music Project. Bowles became one of the preeminent composers of American theater music, producing works for William Saroyan, Tennessee Williams, and others.

In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer, who shortly achieved critical acclaim for her first novel, Two Serious Ladies (1943). Inspired by his wife's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. After the 1940s, he produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works. Among Bowles's best-known fictional works are the novels The Sheltering Sky (1949), Let It Come Down (1952), The Spider's House (1955); and an early short story collection, The Delicate Prey and Other Stories (1950). A 1989 reprint of The Sheltering Sky and Bernardo Bertolucci's 1990 film version of the novel, starring Debra Winger and John Malkovich, revived international interest in Bowles, the writer.

Bowles was also known for his work as a translator. He bestowed the title "No Exit" upon Jean-Paul Sartre's Huis Clos and his 1946 translation of that play remains the standard version for English language productions. During the 1940s, Bowles translated the poems and stories of a wide variety of European and Latin American authors. Bowles taped and transcribed from the Moghrebi tales by Mohammed Mrabet and several other Moroccan story tellers; and he also translated the Guatemalan author Rodrigo Rey Rosa. Bowles translated several works related to North African culture and geography, and wrote introductions and prefaces to photographic collections, travel writing, and stories by other authors.

Paul and Jane Bowles spent much of their married life traveling throughout the world. In the late 1940s they made Tangier, Morocco, their permanent home. Major figures in the world of letters and the arts and international "society" frequently visited them there. Jane Bowles died in 1973, and Bowles continued to reside in Tangier until his death on November 18, 1999.

Born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, John Widdicombe was a member of the Widdicombe furniture-making family. While studying at the University of Virginia, he met an aspiring composer, Paul Bowles, and despite distance, the two maintained a friendship through letters for several decades. Widdicombe and Bowles made plans to visit, often realizing those visits, which included Widdicombe's trip to Morocco, where Bowles eventually settled.

Widdicombe was friend to many artistic and literary figures, including Iris Barry, Elizabeth Bowen, Joe Brewer, and Muriel Draper. After serving in the Second World War, Widdicombe held several government positions and settled in southern Vermont.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles correspondence with John Widdicombe, 1929–1975, 1929–1935, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Laucanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989. Derived from Kae MacDermid Andrew, e-mail messages to Rebecca Johnson Melvin, June 1 and June 9, 2010.

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer. Inspired by his wife's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. After the 1940s, he produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works.

Ruth Baron Honsberger Poole was a friend of Paul Bowles's grandparents. Mrs. Honsberger had a home in Glenmora, as did the Bowles. Mrs. Honsberger provided the financial backing for Paul Bowles's first trip to Europe. In the letter Bowles's thanks her for providing this opportunity.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles letter to Ruth Baron Honsberger Poole, 1929 April 3, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

The American composer and author Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. Bowles was published at age seventeen, abandoned college, and in 1929 began his life of travels with a trip to Paris, where he hoped to establish himself as a poet. Back in New York in 1930, he studied composition with Aaron Copland, whom he also accompanied to Yaddo, Paris, Berlin, and Tangier. With the support of Copland and Virgil Thomson, Bowles found work in New York writing incidental music and scores for ballet and theater. His successful career as a composer took off in the Depression with work for the Federal Theater Project (including music for Orson Welles's Horse Eats Hat ) and the Federal Music Project. Bowles became one of the preeminent composers of American theater music, producing works for William Saroyan, Tennessee Williams, and others. In the last decade, a resurgence of interest in Bowles's music has culminated in a number of major concerts and performances in the United States and Europe. In addition, a new generation of musicians has released several well-received recordings of Bowles's compositions.

In 1938, Paul Bowles married the aspiring writer Jane Auer, who shortly achieved critical acclaim for her first novel, Two Serious Ladies (1943). Inspired by Jane Bowles's success and her dedication to writing, Bowles began his own career as an author, eventually surpassing his already successful reputation as a composer. Since the 1940s, he has produced numerous works of fiction, essays, travel writing, poems, autobiographical pieces, and other works. Among Bowles's best-known fictional works are the novels The Sheltering Sky (1949), Let It Come Down (1952), The Spider's House (1955); and an early short story collection, The Delicate Prey and Other Stories (1950). A 1989 reprint of The Sheltering Sky and Bernardo Bertolucci's 1990 film version of the novel, starring Debra Winger and John Malkovich, revived international interest in Bowles, the writer.

Bowles is equally known as a prolific translator. He bestowed the title "No Exit" upon Jean-Paul Sartre's Huis Clos and his 1946 translation of that play remains the standard version for English language productions. During the 1940s, Bowles translated the poems and stories of a wide variety of European and Latin American authors. Bowles taped and transcribed from the Moghrebi tales by Mohammed Mrabet and several other Moroccan story tellers; and his translations have broadened readership of Guatemalan author Rodrigo Rey Rosa. Bowles has translated several works related to North African culture and geography, and has generously introduced and prefaced photographic collections, travel writing, and stories by other authors who share those interests.

Paul and Jane Bowles spent much of their married life traveling throughout the world and in the late 1940s made Tangier, Morocco, their permanent home. Major figures in the world of letters and the arts and international "society" frequently visited them there. Jane Bowles died in 1973, and Bowles continued to reside in Tangier until his death on November 18, 1999.

Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Laucanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles papers, 1960–1985, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Locher, Frances C. (ed.) Contemporary Authors. Volume 103. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1982. Miller, Jeffrey. Paul Bowles: A Descriptive Bibliography. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. Sawyer-Lauçanno, Christopher. An Invisible Spectator: A Biography of Paul Bowles. New York: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1989.

Paul Frederic Bowles was born in New York City on December 30, 1910. Since the 1940s, Bowles has written numerous works of fiction, essays, translations, travel writing, poems, and other works. Among Bowles’s best-known fictional works are the novels The Sheltering Sky (1949), Let It Come Down (1952), The Spider’s House (1955); and his initial short story collection, The Delicate Prey and Other Stories (1950).

Paul Bowles has also had a prominent career as a composer. He studied with both Aaron Copland and Virgil Thomson, and during the 1930s and 1940s became one of the pre-eminent composers of American theater music.

In 1938, Paul Bowles married the former Jane Auer, who, under her married name, became an accomplished author. Paul and Jane Bowles spent much of their married life traveling throughout the world and in the late 1940s made Tangier, Morocco, their permanent home. Jane Bowles died in 1973, but Bowles has continued to reside in Tangier.

Novelist, playwright, and composer William Saroyan was born on August 31, 1908 in Fresno, California. During his career Saroyan wrote over four hundred short stories, including his noted “My Name Is Aram” (1940) and “The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze,” which received an O. Henry Award in 1934.

He also composed the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, The Time of Your Life (1939) and what has been called the first anti-war novel, The Adventures of Wesley Jackson (1946). Saroyan’s famous novel The Human Comedy (1943) was produced as a movie, starring Mickey Rooney and featuring Rosemary Clooney’s hit song “Come On-A My House,” which Saroyan composed.

His autobiographical works are titled The Bicycle Rider in Beverly Hills (1952) and Sons Come and Go, Mothers Hang In Forever (1976).

William Saroyan died on May 18, 1981, in Fresno, California.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles letters to William Saroyan, 1937–1942, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Biography

Paul Bowles, an American-born writer, composer, and folk music collector, lived in Morocco beginning in the late 1930s. He has been described as the father of the Beat movement and a prominent figure in the American expatriate community in Tangier, Morocco. A well-known composer, his scores include the incidental music to such plays as Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie" and "Sweet Bird of Youth"; he worked with other artists such as Orson Wells, Elia Kazan, and Salvador Dali.

As an author, he is best known for his novels such as The Sheltering Sky, Let It Come Down, and The Spider's House, and for his collections of short stories and travel essays. Extensive travel in Europe, North Africa, and South America provided material for his literary works as well as opportunities to collect folk music. He married novelist Jane Auer (1917-1973) in 1938. Paul Bowles died November 18, 1999 at the age of 88.

From the guide to the Paul Bowles Moroccan Music Collection, 1957-1989, 1959, 1960-1962, (Archive of Folk Culture, American Folklife Center Library of Congress http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.afc/folklife.home)

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Subjects:

  • Music--Manuscripts--Facsimiles
  • Popular music--Morocco
  • Instrumental music
  • Americans--Morocco
  • Translators--Arab countries--20th century
  • Concertos (Pianos (2), percussion with wind ensemble)--Scores
  • Jews--Music
  • Music
  • Dance--Morocco
  • Autobiographies
  • Literature
  • Politics and government--20th century
  • Sonatas (Flute and piano)--Scores
  • Authors, American--20th century--Correspondence
  • Ballet--Scores and parts
  • Literature--20th century
  • Incidental music--Excerpts
  • Songs (low voice) with piano
  • Folk music--Morocco
  • Ramadan
  • Piano music
  • Folk music
  • Musicians--Morocco--Photographs
  • Ballets--Excerpts--2-piano scores
  • American literature--20th century--Sources
  • Composers
  • Islam--Customs and practices
  • Arabs--Morocco--Music
  • Field recordings--Morocco
  • Tangiers (Morocco)--Travel and description
  • Songs, Arabic--Morocco
  • Short stories
  • Rites and ceremonies--Morocco
  • Anthologies
  • Americans--Correspondence
  • Piano music (Pianos (2)), Arranged--Parts
  • American
  • Sonatas (piano)
  • Songs (High voice) with instrumental ensemble--Scores and parts
  • Berbers--Clothing--Morocco
  • Little magazines
  • Percussion music--Morocco
  • Music--Manuscripts
  • Islamic music--Morocco
  • Holidays
  • Composition (music)--History--20th century
  • Incidental music
  • African American jazz musicians
  • Jews, Moroccan--Music
  • Berbers--Morocco--Music
  • Musical instruments--Morocco--Photographs
  • Piano music (Pianos (2), Arranged--Scores
  • Voyages and travels
  • Composers--United States
  • Songs, Berber--Morocco
  • Authors--20th century
  • Sephardim--Morocco--Music
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Authors and publishers--20th century
  • Folk songs, Arabic
  • Publishers and publishing--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Sword-dance--Morocco
  • Songs (medium voice) with piano
  • Rites and ceremonies
  • Falkland Islands War, 1982
  • Authors and publishers
  • Music--Morocco
  • Dance music--Morocco
  • Passenger ships--History--20th century

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Composers--United States
  • Translator
  • Collector
  • Composers
  • Travelers
  • Authors--United States

Places:

  • Morocco (as recorded)
  • Morocco--Tangier peninsula (as recorded)
  • Fès (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Tangier (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • Morocco (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Tangier (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Morocco (as recorded)
  • Thailand (as recorded)
  • Morocco (as recorded)
  • Western Sahara (as recorded)
  • Tangier (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • Tangier (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • Morocco (as recorded)
  • Paris (France) (as recorded)
  • Tangier (Morocco) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Nice (France) (as recorded)
  • Morocco (as recorded)