Anthony, Susan Brownell, 1820-1906

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1820-02-15
Death 1906-03-13
Active 1837
Active 1947
Birth 1820
Death 1906
English

Biographical notes:

Susan B. Anthony (b. February 15, 1820, Adams, Massachusetts-d. March 13, 1906, Rochester, New York)1820-1906), educated in New York and at the Philadelphia Friends Seminary. Anthony taught at various New York schools between 1839 and 1849. She became involved in women's suffrage, temperance, abolitionism, and labor reform after a meeting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1850. Between 1868 and 1870 Anthony edited the "Revolution" a women's suffrage weekly. Best known for her lifelong crusade for woman's suffrage, Anthony was first active in the temperance and anti-slavery movements. In May 1869 she organized the National Woman Suffrage Association, with Elizabeth Cady Stanton as president. From 1891 to 1900, she was the second president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

Suffragist.

From the description of Susan Brownell Anthony papers, 1837-1947. (New York State Historical Documents). WorldCat record id: 155438078

Best known for her lifelong crusade for woman's suffrage, Anthony was first active in the temperance and anti-slavery movements. In May 1869 she organized the National Woman Suffrage Association, with Elizabeth Cady Stanton as president. From 1891 to 1900, she was the second president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. For further information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the guide to the Note, 1873, (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

Susan B. Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts in 1820, the second of seven children of Lucy (Read) Anthony and Daniel Anthony. When SBA was six the family moved to upstate New York. As a young woman SBA alternately managed the family farm and taught school.

Best known for her lifelong crusade for woman's suffrage, SBA was first active in the temperance and anti-slavery movements. The discrimination she and other women encountered at temperance meetings and her friendship with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others concerned with women's rights convinced SBA that women could not fully participate in social action unless they first secured equal rights. In May 1869 she organized the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) with Stanton as president. Other women, led by Lucy Stone and more conservative in their approach, founded the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) later that year. They disagreed with SBA's focus on a federal suffrage amendment and concentrated their efforts on individual states amendments. This schism in the movement lasted for two decades, during which time SBA published The Revolution (1868-1870) and in 1872 cast a vote, for which she was arrested and tried. In the early 1880's she worked together with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage on the first three volumes of the History of Woman Suffrage .

In 1890 AWSA and NWSA merged and became the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA); SBA served as its second president (1891-1900). 1897 found her collaborating with Ida Husted Harper on the two-volume biography, Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony , which appeared in 1898. During this period she also organized the International Council of Women and twice traveled to Europe as head of the U. S. delegation. SBA died in March 1906, one month after attending the NAWSA convention in Baltimore, and fourteen years before the Nineteenth Amendment gave American women the vote.

More complete biographical information is readily available. Besides the above mentioned book by Harper, see Katherine Anthony , Susan B. Anthony: Her Personal History and Her Era , (New York, 1954); Alma Lutz, Susan B. Anthony: Rebel Crusader, Humanitarian , (Boston, 1959); and the article in Notable American Women (Cambridge, Mass., 1971); the last includes a list of additional sources.

From the guide to the Papers, 1815-1961, (Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute)

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Subjects:

  • Women
  • Feminists--United States--History--19th century--Sources
  • Slavery
  • Women--Suffrage--History
  • Women--Social conditions
  • Women's rights
  • Women--Suffrage--United States--History--Sources
  • Women in public life
  • Women--Suffrage--Nebraska
  • Women--Suffrage--History--19th century--Sources
  • Women--Legal status, laws, etc
  • Temperance
  • Feminists--History--19th century--Sources
  • Antislavery movements
  • Social problems
  • Women--Suffrage--19th century
  • Women's rights--Congresses
  • Suffragists--Correspondence--Sources
  • Women's rights--United States--History--19th century--Sources
  • Suffragists
  • Suffragists--Archives
  • Women--Suffrage--History--Sources
  • Women--Suffrage
  • Women--Education--History--19th century
  • Feminists--Archives
  • Suffragists--Photographs
  • Women--Suffrage--United States
  • African Americans--Suffrage
  • Women's rights--History--19th century--Sources
  • Women political activists--Correspondence
  • Suffragists--New York (State)--Rochester--History--Sources
  • Civic Activism
  • Women--Education
  • Women--Suffrage--United States--19th century
  • Oregon
  • Education of women--19th century
  • Women clergy
  • Politics, Government, and Law
  • Women's periodicals, American
  • Suffrage
  • Family records
  • Suffragists--History--Sources
  • Women social reformers--Correspondence
  • Woman--Suffrage
  • Women artists--Photographs
  • Women's rights--History

Occupations:

  • Reformers
  • Abolitionists
  • Women social reformers
  • Collector
  • Suffragists

Places:

  • Rochester, NY, US
  • Robinson (Ill.) (as recorded)
  • Kansas (as recorded)
  • Brooklyn (New York, N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • New England (as recorded)
  • Saratoga Springs (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Adams, MA, US
  • Nebraska (as recorded)