Gallatin, Albert, 1761-1849

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1761-01-29
Death 1849-08-12
Americans
French, English, Latin

Biographical notes:

Diplomat and U.S. secretary of the treasury.

From the description of Albert Gallatin papers, 1783-1847. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 82919649

Albert Gallatin was a member of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives (1790-1792), a U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania (1795-1801), Secretary of the Treasury (1801-1814), and Minister Plenipotentiary to France (1815-1823) and Great Britain (1826-1827).

From the description of Albert Gallatin letter, 1803 Oct. 31. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 163576134

Virgil David was president of the Lawrenceville Lyceum in Western Pennsylvania.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : New York, to Virgil David, Lawrenceville, Pa., 1836 June 2. (University of Chicago Library). WorldCat record id: 81050862

From the description of Autograph letter signed : New York, to Virgil David, Lawrenceville, Pa., 1836 June 2. (University of Chicago Library). WorldCat record id: 55822007

Statesman and diplomat.

From the description of Papers, 1258-1947 (bulk 1780-1849). (New York University). WorldCat record id: 476928953

From the description of Papers, 1794-1952 (bulk 1794-1828, 1890-1952). (New York University). WorldCat record id: 477025151

U. S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-1814.

From the description of Letter, July 27, 1803. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 436785697

Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-1814.

From the description of Letters, 1802-1812. (New-York Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 476438586

Gallatin was born in Switzerland on Jan. 29, 1761, the son of Jean and Sophia Gallatin. He entered the Academy of Geneva at age 13 where he was a brilliant scholar. He then ran away to America, arriving in Boston in 1780. Gallatin served as a delegate from Fayette Co. (Pa.) to the Antifederalist convention in Harrisburg, 1788; convention delegate, 1789, and state representatives, 1790-1793. He was elected as U.S. Senator, 1793, but was denied his seat for not having fulfilled citizenship requirements. Gallatin also served as U.S. Representative, 1795-1801. His financial ideas were widely published. Gallatin also served as Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, 1801-1813, and as American ambassador to France, 1817-1823, and Great Britain, 1827-1827. He worked as president of the National Bank of N.Y., 1827-1839. In 1842, Gallatin served as president of the N.Y. Historical Society. He also helped start the American Ethnological Society and served as its first president. His first wife died in 1789 after a few months of marriage. In 1793, Gallatin married Hannah Nicholson, with whom he had six children. He died on Aug. 13, 1849. (Information from American National Biography.) The libraries at Central Michigan University have many of his publications.

From the description of Copy of a representation in behalf of the Canadian inhabitants of Michigan concerning their lands, 1807. (Clarke Historical Library). WorldCat record id: 46885876

American financier and statesman.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, to Aquila Brown, 1801 Aug. 3. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269587166

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, to Jonathan Russell, Chargé d'Affaires in Paris, 1810 Nov. 5. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269587189

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, to Noah Webster, 1807 Jan. 6. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269587154

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [Washington], to the President of the United States, 1802 Apr. 21. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269586104

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Washington, to C.A. Rodney, 1804 Sept. 25. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269587178

Charles Nicoll Bancker was a merchant and financier.

From the guide to the Charles Nicoll Bancker family papers, 1733-1894, 1733-1894, (American Philosophical Society)

Gallatin, noted financier, served as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Jefferson and Madison.

From the description of ALS, 1839 March 2 : New York, to Bates Cooke, Comptroller, Albany. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 16657469

Gallatin served as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Jefferson and Madison.

From the description of ALS, 1808 July 28 : Treasury Department (Washington, D.C.), to John Wallworth, Collector, Erie. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 16655069

From the description of ALS, 1803 March 30 : Treasury Department (Washington, D.C.), to George Simpson, Cashiers Bank U.S., Philadelphia. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 16655101

Born in Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 29, 1761; graduated from the University of Geneva, 1779 ; emigrated to Boston, Mass., 1780; served in the Revolutionary army; instructor of French, Harvard, 1782; moved to Virginia, 1785, Fayette Co. (now Penn.) member of Penn. constitutional convention, 1789; member of the state house of representatives, 1790-92; member of Congress, Mar. 4, 1795 - Mar. 3, 1801; Secretary of the Treasury, 1802, Jan.26 to Feb. 9, 1814; then appointed one of the commissioners to negotiate the treat of Ghent, Dec. 24, 1814; one of the commissioners negotiating a commercial convention with Great Britain, 1816; U.S. minister to France, 1815-23; minister plemipontiary to Great Britain, May 10, 1826 to Oct. 1, 1827; returned to New York City; became president of the National Bank; died in Aetoria, N.Y., Aug. 12, 1849. (from Appleton's Cyclop.of American Biography) (blue index cards)

From the description of Albert Gallatin correspondence, 1805 December 1 (Detroit Public Library). WorldCat record id: 428688331

U.S. secretary of the treasury and diplomat.

From the description of Papers of Albert Gallatin, 1761-1880. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 80974380

Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) was a financier, diplomat, statesman, and ethnologist.

From the description of Comparative Indian vocabulary, 1836. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 207138173

Secretary of the U.S. Treasury.

From the description of Letter, 1813 March 22 [Washington], to William Smith Shaw, Boston. (Boston Athenaeum). WorldCat record id: 15174111

Born in Waldorf, Germany, John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) immigrated to the United States in 1784 and became a successful fur trader and real estate dealer in New York City. In 1785, he married Sarah Todd, with whom he had five children. Astor established the American Fur Company in 1808, which exported furs from the Great Lakes and Canada to Europe. In the early 1800s, Astor began purchasing and developing land on Manhattan Island. At the time of his death in 1848, he was the wealthiest person in the United States.

Source: “John Jacob Astor Biography.” Encyclopedia of World Biography. Accessed August 2, 2011. http://www.notablebiographies.com/An-Ba/Astor-John-Jacob.html.

From the guide to the John Jacob Astor Collection 2011-203., 1798-1799, 1816, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin)

U.S. Representative and Senator elect from Pennsylvania; appointed Secretary of the Treasury in 1801 by Thomas Jefferson and continuing under President James Madison until 1814; then went to Russia to represent the U.S. in a peace conference with England and France settling hostilities, the outcome of which was the Treaty of Ghent signed in 1814; b. in Switzerland; emigrated to the U.S. in 1780; teacher and scholar; later became president of the National Bank of New York. Gallatin was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1795 and served until 1801. He was elected to the U.S. Senate and took the oath of office on Dec. 2, 1793, but a petition filed with the Senate on the same date alleged that he failed to satisfy the Constitutional citizenship requirement; on Feb. 28, 1794, the Senate determined that Gallatin did not meet the citizenship requirement, and declared his election void.

http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=G000020

From the description of Albert Gallatin papers, 1802-1815. (Litchfield Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 760059403

Jay Winston Johns, Jr. was a coal industrialist from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who moved to Virginia and became a leader in preserving homes of renowned Virginians. He married Helen Lambert (1881-1964). Johns became blind in the late 1950's.

He and his wife owned "Ash Lawn," Albemarle County, Virginia which had been the home of James Monroe and designed by Thomas Jefferson. Johns was founder of the Lee-Jackson Memorial, Inc., a foundation dedicated to preserving the memory of Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson and the South's part in the Civil War; and a founder of the Virginia Trust for Historic Preservation, an organization whose main purpose was that of purchasing, restoring, and maintaining for the public, homes of renowned men specifically, the Lee-Fendall House in Alexandria, Virginia.

Johns, himself was a strong Democrat and corresponded with and publicly supported all of the prominent Virginia political figures of his time. He was a spirited supporter of the Virginia Military Institute as a member of the Board of Visitors, and as an honorary member of the Alumni Association; a charter member, and later trustee of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and a member of the Virginia Chapter of the Society of the Cincinnati. He also received an honorary degree from the College of William and Mary in 1967.

From the guide to the Jay Johns Papers, 1918-1974., (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

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