Child, Lydia Maria, 1802-1880

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1802-02-11
Death 1880-10-20
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Lydia Child was born in Massachusetts and became known as an abolitionist for her tract entitled, "Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans called Africans," (1833). Child's letters to the Governor of Virginia were eventually published as an abolitionist book and she also authored a novel entitled "Hobomok," a story about Indians in colonial Massachusetts.

From the description of Letter, [ca. 1842]. (Temple University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 122618414

Abolitionist, reformer, and one of America's first women of letters, Child published an early antislavery book, An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans, 1833, that created a furor in Boston and helped attract many later famous, male abolitionists to the cause. She was on the executive committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society, edited the National Anti-Slavery Standard (1841-1843), and became an increasingly outspoken proponent of emancipation as the Civil War approached. In later life she renewed her early interest in spiritualism while remaining a humanitarian.

From the description of Letters, 1828-1879 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232006958

American author and reformer.

From the description of Letter : Wayland, Mass., Lydia Maria Child to Lucy Ann [Brooks?], 1878. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 32671817

Lydia Maria Child was born in Massachusetts, and lived there her entire life with the exception of nine years in New York City (1841-1850). She wrote popular works in prose, notably on domestic matters, and supported herself and her husband through her writing. She also wrote prolifically about reform causes, primarily the abolition of slavery, about which she believed fervently and wrote passionately.

From the description of Lydia Maria Child letters, 1827-1872. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 49767456

Lydia Maria Francis Child (1802-1880) was an American abolitionist, reformer and author. She published works on numerous subjects, including domestic advice, children's literature, abolition, and religion. She was an active abolitionist in New York and Massachusetts.

From the description of Lydia Maria Francis Child papers, 1838-1878. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122597763

From the guide to the Lydia Maria Francis Child papers, 1838-1878, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Author and abolitionist.

From the description of Correspondence of Lydia Maria Francis Child, 1817-1880. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 83835786

Child was an abolitionist, reformer, and one of America's first women of letters. For biographical information, see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971).

From the description of Correspondence, 1842-1867 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232008681

American author and abolitionist.

From the description of Papers of Lydia Maria Francis Child [manuscript], 1844-1877. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647805034

Lydia Maria Child, born in Medford, Massachusetts in 1802, published on numerous subjects, including domestic advice, children's literature, abolition and religion, and was an active abolitionist in New York and Massachusetts. She died in 1880.

From the guide to the The collected correspondence of Lydia Maria Child, 1817-1880 (inclusive), [microform]., 1817-1880, (American Philosophical Society)

Epithet: née Francis; American author

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000001393.0x000395

Lydia Maria Child, American author of works including A Brief History of the Condition of Women (1845), a series of Letters from New York (1844-49), and The Progress of Religious Ideas (1855). A strong Abolitionist who edited the antislavery New York Standard with her husband, she offered to nurse John Brown after his capture in 1859.

From the description of Barbara D. Simison papers relating to Lydia Maria Child, 1836-1947. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702144918

Lydia Maria Francis Child (1802-1880) was a noted author and reformer.

From the description of Letters, 1845-1880. (American Antiquarian Society). WorldCat record id: 214057069

Lydia Maria Francis Child was an American author and an abolitionist. Her works include the novels HOBOMONK (1824) and THE REBELS, OR, BOSTON BEFORE THE REVOLUTION (1825), and she founded JUVENILE MISCELLANY (1825), a bi-monthly magazine for children. In 1833 she wrote AN APPEAL IN FAVOR OF THAT CLASS OF AMERICANS CALLED AFRICANS, which drew a lot of support as well as criticism and hostility, but she kept on undaunted, attacking slavery in several other works. When John Brown was wounded and imprisoned at Harper's Ferry, Child asked the governor for permission to come to Virginia and nurse him.

From the description of Lydia Maria Child collection, 1857-1878. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 63051733

Child was an American novelist and ardent supporter for the abolishment of slavery. Holley was an American satirist and ardent suffragette.

From the description of [Letter] 1879 Dec. 29, 8 Dover St., Boston [to] Miss Holley / L. Maria Child. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 184954788

American author.

From the description of The rebel Faulkner [manuscript], 1861. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647824393

From the description of Letter to Edward Lillie Pierce, n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 49381056

Author.

From the description of Lydia Maria Francis Child correspondence, 1856-1876. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79453237

Epithet: American Authoress

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000001393.0x000394

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Lydia Maria Child was born Lydia Maria Francis in Medford, Massachusetts in February, 1802. Francis was born into an abolitionist family and was greatly influenced by her brother, Convers, who would later become a Unitarian Clergyman. After the death of her mother in 1814, Child moved to Maine to live with her sister and began teaching in Gardiner in 1819. While living in Maine, Child became increasingly interested in Native Americans and visited many nearby settlements. Child began actively writing shortly after returning to Massachusetts to live with her brother. She published her first novel, Hobomok, in 1824, at the age of 22. The story depicted the relationship between a girl from New England and a Native American. Although the book was published anonymously, Child would later gain fame as the author of Hobomok, the first American historical novel.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Child continued to have a vibrant writing career throughout her life; she was the pioneer of many writing forms, such as historical fiction, children's literature, and women's literature. In 1826, she founded Juvenile Miscellany, the first children's periodical in the United States; she published The American Frugal Housewife in 1844. Child published her first anti-slavery book in 1833, An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans We Call Africans, arguing for full, uncompensated emancipation of slavery and full racial equality.

BIOGHIST REQUIRED Following her marriage to journalist and fellow abolitionist, David Lee Child, in 1828, Child and her husband became acquainted with William Lloyd Garrison, who greatly influenced their devotion to abolitionism. With her husband, Child established the National Anti-Slavery Standard, the official weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society, in 1840. Among her many abolitionist efforts, Child transcribed recollections of freed slaves and edited Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). Public reactions to her actions were frequently negative, but Child continued with her endeavors against slavery and also supported both women's rights and Native American rights throughout her life. Child died in 1880, at age 78, in her home in Wayland, Massachusetts.

From the guide to the Lydia Maria Child papers, circa 1829-1879., (Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

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Subjects:

  • Antislavery movements
  • African Americans--Suffrage
  • Slavery
  • Children's literature
  • Race relations
  • Women--Correspondence
  • Music
  • Women abolitionists--19th century--Correspondence
  • Abolitionists--Family relationships
  • Slavery in literature
  • Authors, American
  • Traditional medicine
  • Family records
  • Applications for positions
  • Antislavery movements--United States
  • American literature--19th century
  • Women abolitionists
  • Authors, American--19th century
  • Prejudices
  • Women authors, American--19th century
  • Families--Health and hygiene
  • Governesses
  • American literature--Women authors
  • Abolitionists--United States
  • Musicians
  • Women--Suffrage
  • Antisemitism
  • Marriage
  • Women authors, American - 19th century--Correspondence
  • Music appreciation
  • Women
  • Abolitionists
  • Voyages and travels

Occupations:

  • Women authors
  • Abolitionists
  • Social reformers
  • Authors

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • South Natick (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)