Lashley, Karl S. (Karl Spencer), 1890-1958

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1890-06-07
Death 1958-08-07

Biographical notes:

Lashley taught psychology at Harvard.

From the description of Papers of Karl S. Lashley, 1957-1959 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 76973092

Psychologist.

Karl Spencer Lashley was born June 7, 1890, in Davis, West Virginia. He attended the University of West Virginia and Johns Hopkins, earning degrees in zoology. His academic career began at the University of Minnesota, where he did research from 1920-1926. In 1937, he was recruited by Harvard as a research professor in neuropsychology. Later he became head of the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology in Orange Park, Florida. He died August 7, 1958, in Poitiers, France.

Lashley is best known for his work on learning ability and brain function, visual pattern perception in rats, and his critique of behavorial theories. He was a pioneer in the field of physiological psychology.

From the description of Papers, 1923-1958, bulk 1950-1958. (University of Florida). WorldCat record id: 48664087

Karl Spencer Lashley was a pioneer in the field of physiological psychology. He was born June 7, 1890, in Davis, West Virginia. He received his A.B. from the University of West Virginia in 1910, his M.S. from Pittsburg in 1911, and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins in 1914. His degrees were all in the field of zoology, although he minored in psychology at Johns Hopkins. At Johns Hopkins, he worked with John B. Watson and the two conducted field research on the homing behavior of terns in the Dry Tortugas. His histological and surgical training took place at Saint Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. under Shepard Ivory Franz.

Lashley's academic career began at the University of Minnesota where he conducted research (and taught occasionally) from 1920 to 1926. He was a member of the University of Chicago faculty from 1926 to 1935. In 1935, Lashley was recruited by Harvard and was made research professor in neuropsychology in 1937. In 1942, he succeeded Robert M. Yerkes to head the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology in Orange Park, Florida. Lashley retired from Harvard and Yerkes in 1955. He died on August 7, 1958, in Poitiers, France.

Lashley is best known for his work on learning ability and brain function, visual pattern-perception in rats, and his critique of behavioral theories. His research involved a variety of species, including humans, and he was an early supporter of ethology and comparative psychology. His published works include one monograph, Brain Mechanism and Intelligence (1929) and numerous articles.

Lashley married Edith Ann Baker in 1918. Edith died in 1948. In 1957, Lashley married Claire Imredy Schiller, widow of the Hungarian psychologist Paul Harkai Schiller.

From the guide to the Karl Spencer Lashley Papers, 1923-1958, 1950-1958, (Special and Area Studies Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida)

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Subjects:

  • Learning ability
  • Psychology
  • Brain--Localization of functions
  • Neuropsychology
  • Psychologists--Correspondence
  • Psychophysiology

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