Longstreet, James, 1821-1904

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1821-01-08
Death 1904-01-02

Biographical notes:

U.S. railroad commissioner, army officer, and diplomat.

From the description of James Longstreet papers, 1858-circa 1877. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70980713

James Longstreet, military man, businessman, diplomat, and railway commissioner, was born 8 January 1821, in Edgefield District, South Carolina, and died 2 January 1904, in Gainesville, Georgia. He was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy (1842) and served in the Mexican War before he resigned from the U.S. Army to become a general in the Confederate Army. After the war he was president of an insurance company and was a cotton factor in New Orleans, Louisiana. He served as U.S. minister to Turkey (1880-1881), authored FROM MANASSAS TO APPOMATTOX (1896), and was U.S. Railway commissioner (1898).

From the description of James Longstreet papers, 1850-1904. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 173863004

Confederate general.

From the description of ALS, New Orleans, La., to E.A. Carman, Jersey City, N.J., 1876 Jan. 30. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122380606

From the description of James Longstreet papers, 1875-1904 [manuscript]. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 25255423

Lt. Gen. Confederate Army.

From the description of Letter, Washington, to Daniel Edgar Sickles, Gettysburg [manuscript] 1902 Sep. 19. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647938114

Confederate officer.

From the description of Papers, 1848-1904. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 19932943

James Longstreet (1821-1904) was a Confederate general. Longstreet was born in South Carolina and educated at the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. He served in the United States Army during the Mexican War. His command during the Civil War, particularly at Gettysburg, has stirred historical controversy. After the Civil War, Longstreet served as a Republican politician and United States diplomat.

From the guide to the James Longstreet Papers, ., 1875-1904, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

James Longstreet was born in Edgefield District, South Carolina on January 8, 1821. Longstreet graduated from West Point in 1842, and served in the U.S. Army until his resignation on June 1, 1861. He was commissioned into the Confederate Army on June 17, 1861. Longstreet was originally a Confederate division commander under Joseph E. Johnston and he became Robert E. Lee's most distinguished lieutenant following the death of Stonewall Jackson, May 10, 1863. While with Lee, Longstreet was blamed for the Confederate failure at Gettysburg. Longstreet created a new life for himself following the Civil War. He held a variety of public offices throughout the South. Longstreet died on January 2, 1904 and is buried in Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, Georgia.

From the description of James Longstreet collection, 1862-1945. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 38477520

Confederate Army general.

From the description of Papers, 1862-1863. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70976135

From the description of James Longstreet papers, 1862-1863. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 166427646

Born in Edgefield District, S.C.; graduated, 1842, from West Point, and served in the U.S. Army until his resignation, 1 June 1861; commissioned into the Confederate Army 17 June 1861; following the Civil War, Longstreet held a variety of public offices throughout the South and was buried in Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, the seat of Hall County, Georgia, a town that developed as a mountain health resort during later 19th century, and in 1900, shortly before Longstreet's death, welcomed the textile mill industry.

From the description of James Longstreet papers, 1861 Mar. 17 - 1901 June 24. (University of South Carolina). WorldCat record id: 31444811

Confederate army officer.

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : Gainesville, Ga., to Mr. Taylor, 1885 Feb. 5. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270591950

From the description of Signature on report of Statement of Public Funds : Office of U.S. Marshal, Atlanta, 1884 Mar. 29. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270593275

From the description of Printed order filled out and signed in his name : Adamstown, Md., 1862 Sept. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270593233

From the description of Signature on report of Statement of Public Funds : Office of U.S. Marshal, Atlanta, 1884 Feb. 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270593272

From the description of Signature on report of Statement of Public Funds : Office of U.S. Marshal, Atlanta, 1882 July 31. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270593269

From the description of Signature on report of Statement of Public Funds : Office of U.S. Marshal, Atlanta, 1884 May 31. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270593278

Robert William Hughes was born at Muddy Creek Plantation, Powhatan County, Va. in 1821. His parents died in 1822 and he was raised by Edward C. Carrington and Eliza Preston Carrington. He attended Caldwell Institute, Greensboro, N. C. and studied law in Fincastle, Va. He married Eliza M. Johnston, niece of Joseph E. Johnston and the adopted daughter and niece of John B. Floyd. Hughes' son was Robert Morton Hughes. Robert William Hughes was a newspaper editor and federal district attorney. Involved in post Civil War Republican Party politics, he was nominated for governor of Virginia and for Congress but did not win. He was appointed judge of the federal court for the Eastern District of Virginia.

  • 16 Jan. 1821: Born at Muddy Creek Plantation, Powhatan Co., Va.,the son of Jesse and Elizabeth Woodson (Morton) Hughes.
  • 1822: Both parents died, and Hugheswas raised by Gen. Edward C. Carringtonand his wife, Eliza(Preston) Carringtonof Halifax Co., Va.(family relationship not known).
  • Ca. 1833 - 1837 : "put to the carpenter's trade in Princeton, N.J."
  • Ca. 1837 - 1838 : Attended Caldwell Institute,Greensboro, N.C.
  • Ca. 1839: Tutor, Bingham High School,Hillsboro, N.C.
  • 1843: Studied law, Fincastle, Va.
  • 1846: Began practice of law, Richmond, Va.
  • 4 June 1850: Married Eliza M. Johnston,(1825-1908), niece of Gen. Joseph E. Johnstonand niece and adopted daughter of John Buchananand Sarah (Preston) Floyd.
  • 1850: Began writing editorials for the Richmond Examiner.
  • 1853 - 1857 : Editor of the Richmond Examinerwhile regular editor in Europe.
  • 1855: Birth of son, Robert Morton Hughes.
  • 1857 - 1861 : Editor of the Washington Union,and lived in home of Secretary of War John Buchanan Floyd.
  • 1861: Birth of son, Floyd Hughes(2 other children died young)
  • 1861: Because of "chronic disease" retired to a farm near Abingdon, Va.,where General and Mrs. Floyd1ived with the Hughes family.
  • 1861 - 1864 : Wrote for the Richmond Examiner,showing hostility toward Jefferson Davis' administration.
  • 1865 - 1866 : Edited the Richmond Republic,and generally pursued a course that considered "nimble"
  • 1868: Delegate to National Democratic Convention.
  • 1869 - 1870 : Editor of the Richmond State Journal.
  • Ca. 1870: Wounded William E. Cameronin a duel.
  • 1872: Named federal district attorney by Grant administration.
  • 1872: Nominated for Congressbut did not win.
  • 1873: Nominated for Governor of Virginiabut did not win.
  • 1874: Named Judge of federal court for the Eastern District of Va.
  • 1898: Resigned judgeship.
  • 1901: Died at Abingdon, Va.

Dictionary of American Biography

From the guide to the Inventory of the Robert William Hughes Papers, 1818-1900, (Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary)

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Subjects:

  • Migration, Internal--History--19th century
  • Patent licenses
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Gold standard
  • Railroads--Virginia
  • Harbors--United States
  • Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
  • Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
  • Wilderness, Battle of the, Va., 1864
  • Soldiers
  • Lookout Mountain, Battle of, Tenn., 1863
  • Malvern Hill, Battle of, Va., 1862
  • Chancellorsville, Battle of, Chancellorsville, Va., 1863
  • Authors, American
  • Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )
  • Monuments
  • Sectionalism (United States)
  • Generals--Correspondence
  • Horses--Virginia
  • United States--Politics and government--1865-1900
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848--Equipment and supplies
  • Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa., 1863
  • Real property
  • Veterans' writings, American
  • Canals--United States

Occupations:

  • Army officers
  • Soldiers--Confederate States of America
  • Soldiers
  • Generals--Confederate States of America
  • Public officials
  • Practice of law--Virginia--History
  • Authors
  • Lawyers--Virginia--Correspondence
  • Diplomats
  • Veterans

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Pennsylvania--Gettysburg (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • Yorktown (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Texas--San Antonio (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Yorktown (Va.) (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Hall County (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Gainesville (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Georgia--Dahlonega (as recorded)
  • Seven Pines (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Georgia--Hall County (as recorded)
  • Albuquerque (N.M.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Gainesville (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)