Copeland, Royal S. (Royal Samuel), 1868-1938

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1868-11-07
Death 1938-06-17

Biographical notes:

Professor of homeopathic medicine at University of Michigan, mayor of Ann Arbor, Michigan, dean of the New York Homeopathic Medical College and director of Flower Hospital, New York City Commissioner of Public Health, and Democratic U.S. Senator from New York, 1923-1938.

From the description of Royal Samuel Copeland papers, 1892-1938. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34419687

Professor of homoeopathic medicine at University of Michigan, mayor of Ann Arbor, Michigan, dean of the New York Homeopathic Medical College and director of Flower Hospital, New York City Commissioner of Public Health, and Democratic U. S. Senator from New York, 1923-1938.

From the description of Royal Samuel Copeland papers, 1862-1938 (bulk 1892-1938) (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 80096750

Royal S. Copeland, physician, public health officer, newspaper columnist, and United States Senator, was born November 7, 1868 in Dexter, Michigan. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan in 1889. After some postgraduate study in Europe, he practiced medicine in Bay City from 1890 to 1895. From 1895 to 1908, he was professor in the Homeopathic Medical College of the University of Michigan. For part of this time from 1901 to 1903, Copeland was elected and served as mayor of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

In 1908, Copeland moved to New York City where he became dean of the Flower Hospital Medical College. Here he developed a reputation as an eye specialist, teacher, and medical writer. In 1918, the mayor of New York selected Copeland to be the city's commissioner of public health. He was an able administrator who used his own newspaper column as well as other publicity to educate the public about matters of health.

In 1922, Copeland was nominated (and later elected) as the compromise Democratic candidate for the United States Senate. He was reelected in 1928 and again in 1934. While in the Senate, Copeland demonstrated a special interest in pure food and drug legislation. He is best known for the Copeland-Lea Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Bill that was passed in 1938 after five years of labor. Although a Democrat, Copeland frequently opposed President Roosevelt and his New Deal legislation. Notably, Copeland was a leading opponent of Roosevelt's court reform plan.

In 1937, Copeland was persuaded to seek the nomination for mayor of New York. He ran in both party primaries and lost in both despite the support of Al Smith.

Copeland died while still serving as a United States senator on June 17, 1938.

From the guide to the Royal S. Copeland Papers, 1892-1938, (Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan)

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http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6ff44gs
Ark ID:
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SNAC ID:
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Subjects:

  • Churches--Michigan--Dexter
  • New Deal, 1933-1939
  • Homeopathy
  • Journalists
  • Dwellings--Michigan--Cadillac
  • Travel
  • Medicine
  • Newspapers
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Physicians
  • Mayor
  • Mayors--Michigan--Ann Arbor
  • Physicians--Michigan--Ann Arbor
  • Draft
  • Public health
  • Physicians--New York (State)--New York
  • Depressions--1929--United States
  • Depressions--1929-1938
  • Dwellings--Michigan--Dexter
  • American newspapers--Sections, columns, etc
  • Depressions--1929
  • Journalists--United States
  • Buildings--Michigan--Dexter
  • Interiors--Domestic--1900
  • Epidemics

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Ann Arbor (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • Dexter (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • Dexter (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • Cadillac (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Dexter (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Ann Arbor (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • Michigan--Ann Arbor (as recorded)
  • Ann Arbor (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)