Tarbell, Ida M. (Ida Minerva), 1857-1944

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1857-11-05
Death 1944-01-06

Biographical notes:

Ida M. Tarbell was an investigative journalist best known from her The History of the Standard Oil Company published in 1904. She wrote for American Magazine, which she also co-owned and co-edited, from 1906 to 1915.

From the guide to the Ida M. Tarbell papers, 1916-1930, (Ohio University)

Historian, journalist, lecturer, and muckraker, (Allegheny College, A.B., 1880). For further information, see Notable American Women (1971).

From the description of The nationalizing of business, 1878-1898 manuscript 1936. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232006877

One of the first female journalists, she was a staff writer, editor, and minority stockholder at progressive McClure's Magazine. She corresponded with Jesse Weik re: his and her work on Lincoln.

From the description of Letters, 1895-1898. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 55768327

Journalist, lecturer and author of many books including The history of the Standard Oil Company and The life of Abraham Lincoln; editor of McClure's magazine and The American magazine; graduate of Allegheny College (1880).

From the description of Papers, 1890-1944. (Allegheny College). WorldCat record id: 38253097

Biographer of Abraham Lincoln.

From the description of Letter, 1930, January 17, [to] Earl Kubicek, Chicago, Ill. : typescript / Ida M. Tarbell. (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign). WorldCat record id: 26536403

American editor, author, and co-founder of the American Magazine.

From the description of Letters, 1906. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122461467

Ida Minerva Tarbell was born in Erie County, Pennsylvania on 5 November 1857, the daughter of Esther Ann McCullough and Franklin Sumner Tarbell. She attended local public schools and graduated from Allegheny College in 1880, the sole woman of her class.

Ida M. Tarbell, undated

She taught for a few years at Poland Union Seminary, in Poland, Ohio, and worked for The Chatauquan, a home-study teaching guide based in Meadville, Pennsylvania from 1883 to 1891. She left her job, traveling to Paris to study the role of women in the French Revolution. While there, she supported herself by writing occasional articles for Scribner's magazine and by 1892, McClure's, including a series of articles on Napoleon Bonaparte that was published in book form in 1895. She also wrote biographies of Madame Roland (1896) and Abraham Lincoln (1900), but remains best known for her scathing expose, The History of Standard Oil (1904). She was an assistant editor of McClure's from 1894 to 1906. She was one of a group of investigative journalists (dubbed "muckrakers" by Theodore Roosevelt) who owned and edited the American Magazine from 1906 to 1915. She then lectured on the Chautauqua circuit until 1932, speaking on a variety of topics and occasionally writing articles for magazines.

Though a supporter of women's rights early in her career, she did not support women's suffrage, a position that caused friction between her and those she worked with on a variety of causes. She suffered from Parkinson's disease in her later years and died in Bridgeport, Connecticut on 6 January 1944

From the guide to the Ida Tarbell Papers MS 159., 1896-1943, (Sophia Smith Collection)

Journalist; Historian; Biographer.

Born Erie County, Pennsylvania, 1857; graduated from Allegheny College, 1880. Taught at an Ohio seminary, then worked for The Chatauquan, a home-study teaching guide based in Meadville, PA, 1883-91. Traveled to Paris where she supported herself by writing articles for Scribner's and McClure's magazines, including series of articles on Napoleon Bonaparte (published as a book, 1895). She also wrote biographies of Madame Roland (1896) and Abraham Lincoln (1900) but remains best known for her expose, The History of Standard Oil (1904). Was an assistant editor, McClure's, 1894-1906 and collectively owned and edited the American Magazine with a group of investigative journalists (dubbed "muckrakers" by Theodore Roosevelt), 1906-15. Though a supporter of women's rights, she did not support women's suffrage.

From the description of Papers, 1896-1943. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 50507275

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Subjects:

  • Women and war--History
  • Women and war--United States--History
  • Women journalists
  • Women--Suffrage--History
  • Plagiarism
  • Investigative reporting--20th century--History
  • Women--Suffrage--United States--History
  • Journalism--United States--History--20th century--Sources
  • Women journalists--20th century--Sources
  • Authors, American--Correspondence
  • Journalists--20th century--Sources
  • Business
  • American literature--Women authors
  • Journalism--History--20th century--Sources
  • Women journalists--United States--History--Sources
  • Journalism--20th century--History
  • Ẁomen authors, American--Correspondence
  • Women journalists--History--Sources

Occupations:

  • Historians

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)