Shaw, Bernard, 1856-1950

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1856-07-26
Death 1950-11-02
Gender:
Male
IE
English, French, Italian, German

Biographical notes:

British playwright; literary, art and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. One of the founders of the Fabian Society, precursor of England's Socialist Party.

From the description of Richard S. Weiner Collection of George Bernard Shaw, 1886-1950. (Colgate University). WorldCat record id: 31366657

Playwright and critic; founding member of Fabian Society, 1884.

From the description of Bernard Shaw papers, 1878-1964. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 26380339

For a full biography, see the description for the Shaw business papers (Ref: Shaw).

From the guide to the SHAW, George Bernard, 1856-1950: Diaries, 1885-1897, (British Library of Political and Economic Science)

Bernard Shaw, born George Bernard Shaw, was an Irish writer of novels, plays, poems, short stories, and literary criticism.

From the description of Bernard Shaw collection of papers, 1873-1960 bulk (1889-1950). (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122465674

From the guide to the Bernard Shaw collection of papers, 1873-1960, 1889-1950, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Born, Dublin, 1856; attended a Weslyan school, but was largely self educated through visits to the National Gallery of Ireland and wide reading; worked as a cashier, 1872-1876; moved to London in 1876 to join his mother and sister; wrote but failed to publish five novels, 1878-1883; strongly influenced by Karl Marx's Das Kapital ; joined and became a leading member of the Fabian Society, 1884, and edited Fabian Essays in Socialism , 1889; worked as a book, drama and music critic for the Pall Mall Gazette, 1885-1888, the World , 1886-1889, the Star , 1888-1890, and the Saturday Review, 1895-1898; published The quintessence of Ibsenism , 1891; wrote Widowers' Houses for performance by Independent Theatre , 1892, attacking slum landlords and allying Shaw with a realistic and political movement in the theatre; this was followed by The Philanderer (1893), Mrs Warren's Profession (1893, concerning prostitution and banned until 1902), Arms and the Man (1894), Candida (1897) and You Never Can Tell (1899); obtained first successful production of a play with The Devil's Disciple , New York, 1897; married Charlotte Payne-Townshend, 1898; wrote Captain Brassbound's Conversion for Ellen Terry, 1900; completed Caesar and Cleopatra , 1899, which was produced by Mrs Patrick Campbell in 1901; established as a playwright of international importance, with the completion and performance of Man and Superman (1901-1903), John Bull's Other Island (1904), Major Barbara (1905) and The Doctor's Dilemma (1906), which were produced by Harley Granville-Barker for the Royal Court Theatre; wrote his most popular play, Pygmalion , in 1913 (he later adapted it for the screen, winning an Academy Award in the process); during World War One, made numerous anti-war speeches; his postwar plays include Heartbreak House (1920), Back to Methuselah (1922), and St Joan (1923); won the Nobel Prize for Literature, 1925, but refused the award; established the Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation for the translation of Swedish literature into English; wrote extensively on social, economic and political issues, notably The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism (1928), and Everybody's Political What's What? (1944); his later plays, produced at the Malvern Festivals, included The Apple Cart (1929), Too True to be Good (1932) and Geneva (1939); retired, 1943; left residue of his estate to institute a British alphabet of at least 40 letters; died 1950. Publications: include: The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism (Constable & Co, London, 1928); The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God (Constable & Co, London, 1932); Everybody's Political What's What? (Constable & Co, London, 1944).

From the guide to the SHAW, George Bernard (1856-1950), 1927-1928, (Queen Mary, University of London)

Author, critic, polemicist, and personality, George Bernard Shaw was one of the great scholars of his age, a forward-thinking and influential political thinker, and a unique and original public figure. Perhaps most importantly, Shaw was the best and most influential playwright in English since Shakespeare. Scathingly honest, omni-talented, and instinctively controversial, Shaw continues to influence diverse artists in diverse genres.

From the description of Bernard Shaw letters and papers, 1892-1969. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 52221278

Shaw was a British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. Bernard F. Burgunder began collecting Shaw after his graduation from Cornell in 1918 and until his death in 1986.

From the description of Bernard Shaw publications, probably 1964-1985. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 298305691

Irish dramatist, novelist and critic.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, to Francis Kettaneh, 1944 Oct. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 765372702

From the description of Dramatists self-revealed : corrected typescript signed : [London], [1925]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 764684388

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Courmayeur, to The Stewart & Kidd Co., 1911 Sept. 4. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 765365930

From the description of Dramatists self-revealed : typescript and autograph manuscript in pencil : [London, 1925] / prepared with Archibald Henderson. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270129878

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [Welwyn or London], to Gerald Barry, 1930 Mar. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 764728172

From the description of Democracy and the apple cart : corrected proofs, [1930 Mar.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 764728210

English-Irish dramatist.

From the description of Autograph letters signed (2) and typed letters signed (2) : London and Holkham, to William A. Page, 1902 July 4-1902 Sept. 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270664224

Shaw, considered one of the greatest British playwrights and social thinkers, won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1925.

From the description of ALS, 1924 July 29 : the Highland Hotel, Strathpeffer, to Archibald Henderson, Skyland, N.C. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 16813974

British playwright, novelist, and critic.

From the description of Photograph of George Bernard Shaw, 1942 November 6. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 51091603

British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. One of the founders of the Fabian Society, precursor of England's Socialist Party.

From the description of "Love among the artists" original manuscript of chapter IV, book II, probably 1900. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310400791

From the description of Speech written for Mrs. Patrick Campbell, 1928. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 309031880

From the description of "How to become a musical critic" typescript sections and first proof, 1960. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310629826

From the description of "Arms and the man" manuscript, 1894. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 302389105

From the description of Bernard Shaw manuscript fragments of "Widowers' houses", between 1884-1892. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310400787

From the description of Album of newspaper clippings, 1913. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 308187141

From the description of "Music in London" album of articles, 1891-1894. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 308186905

From the description of "Widowers' houses" album of reviews, 1892-1895. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 308187062

From the description of "Caesar and Cleopatra" original prologue, 1912. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 308186819

From the description of Shaw pressed flower, 1878-1879. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 311779951

From the description of Shaw photo, 1902 or 1903. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 311779960

From the description of Bernard Shaw earliest library, 1968-1969. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 298184342

From the description of "Worst journey in the world" postscript, 1948. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 302389108

From the description of Bernard Shaw notebook, 1921-1963. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 298184330

From the description of "Love among the artists" original manuscript of chapter I, book II, probably 1900. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310400790

From the description of Bernard Shaw ephemera, 1884-1944. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310399640

From the description of Bernard Shaw papers relating to "Candida", 1895. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310400043

From the description of Bernard Shaw papers relating to "Man and superman", 1903. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310400784

From the description of "Artstruck Englishman" manuscript and proof sheets, probably 1917. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 302389104

From the description of "Alps and Balkans" manuscript, 1894. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 301667637

From the description of "Garden of Eden" original draft transcript, 1918. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 301667640

From the description of "Irrational knot" manuscript ending, 1886. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 302320403

From the description of "Cashel Byron's profession" manuscript and review, 1929. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 595202535

From the description of "How to become a musical critic" corrected proof, 1960. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 595202531

From the description of Bernard Shaw letter to Lord Kennet, between 1922 and 1950. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 595202558

From the description of "Getting married" manuscript draft, 1907-1908. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 595202525

From the description of Bernard Shaw letters to Charlotte Shaw, 1896-1934. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 595202554

From the description of Bernard F. Burgunder Collection of George Bernard Shaw, [ca. 1810]-1990. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 63936462

From the description of Shaw and music, between 1880-1885. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 309031908

From the description of Bernard Shaw address book, circa 1920s-1950. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 276911261

From the description of Shaw Dublin testimonial, 1876-1878. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 312036366

From the description of "Conscientious objectors" manuscript, 1916. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 312036346

From the description of "Geneva" manuscript proofs, 1938-1946. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310629855

Irish playwright, social critic, and Fabian leader.

From the description of George Bernard Shaw Collection, 1757-1963 (bulk 1875-1950). (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (HRC); University of Texas at Austin). WorldCat record id: 122349045

Irish journalist, critic, novelist and playwright.

From the description of Letters, 1922-1950. (University of Iowa Libraries). WorldCat record id: 233118398

Irish playwright and critic; full name George Bernard Shaw.

From the description of ALS : London, to George T. Keating, 1923 Dec. 20. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122626238

Irish dramatist.

From the description of Autograph letters signed (2) : Derry, Roscaberry, County Cork, to Robert William Welch, 1905 Sept. 23-1905 Sept. 24. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270664228

From the description of Autograph postal card signed with initials : Ayot St. Lawrence, Welwyn, to Sir Sydney Cockerell, 1942 Aug. 21. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270664530

Shaw was a British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; socialist, and a founder of the Fabian Society. Laurence was a noted scholar, editor, and bibliographer who devoted his professional life to compiling the voluminous works of George Bernard Shaw.

From the description of "How to become a musical critic" addendum, probably 1960. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 298184336

Anglo-English dramatist and author.

From the description of Collection, 1884-1931. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122477995

Irish playwright and critic.

From the description of [Note and cartoon] [between 1922 and 1930] (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 214282424

From the description of TLS : to the editor of the Nation, [ca. 1909]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122684210

Playwright, novelist, and social reformer George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856. He later moved to London with his mother and his sister. He began his literary career as a novelist in the 1870s, but increasingly focused his energies on writing plays starting in the 1890s. His novels, dramatic works, and nonfiction writing were informed by his political and reformist concerns. Shaw has been categorized as one of the important reform writers of the early twentieth century. He died in 1950.

From the description of Papers, 1879-1937. (Kent State University). WorldCat record id: 52344665

Shaw was an Irish dramatist. Daly was an American actor. Daly performed in the 1905 Broadway production of Shaw's John Bull's other island.

From the description of Letters to Arnold Daly, 1904-1910. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79918576

From the guide to the Letters to Arnold Daly, 1904-1910., (Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

British dramatist, novelist and critic.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [n.p.], to an Hungarian correspondent, V.O. Plenazár, 1829 July 15 [i.e. 1929]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270663467

From the description of Typed letter signed with autograph corrections : London, to Frank Harris, 1919 May 24. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270665094

Shaw was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and Socialist propagandist.

From the description of Papers, 1897-1939. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 79662001

From the guide to the Papers, 1897-1939., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Dramatist, author, and critic. Full name: George Bernard Shaw.

From the description of Letters of Bernard Shaw, 1892-1928 (1896-1900). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 84163545

More than a dramatist, George Bernard Shaw was a critic, a man of letters, a personality, and a celebrity. Confident, opinionated, and possessed of an intimidating intelligence, Shaw became the most formidable English playwright in centuries, innovative, entertaining, and always pointed. His outrageous behavior, larger than life persona, and writing on music, art, politics, and literature all contribute to his legend and legacy.

From the description of George Bernard Shaw letters and manuscripts, 1906-1940. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 50163400

British playwright best known for his comic dramas.

From the description of Note, 1903-1938. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122535881

Born in Dublin, at the age of twenty George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) moved to London and began to write music and drama criticism, as well as novels. He was an active socialist and public orator, joining the Fabian Society in 1884 (where he met his wife Charlotte Payne-Townsend), and serving on its executive committe from 1885-1911. He wrote his first play, Widower's House, in 1891, going on to write many plays including Candida, Mrs Warren's Profession, Pygmalion, Saint Joan, and Back to Methuselah. Declining to go into politics, he helped found the London School of Economics and was closely associated with the intellectual revival of British theatre, winning the Nobel Prize in Literature and an Oscar in his lifetime.

From the guide to the George Bernard Shaw Financial Papers, 1894-1920, (V&A Department of Theatre and Performance)

George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856; attended a Weslyan school, but was largely self educated through visits to the National Gallery of Ireland and wide reading; worked as a cashier, 1872-1876; moved to London in 1876 to join his mother and sister; wrote but failed to publish five novels, 1878-1883; joined and became a leading member of the Fabian Society, 1884, and edited Fabian Essays in Socialism (1889); worked as a book, drama and music critic for the Pall Mall Gazette , 1885-1888, the World (1886-1889), the Star (1888-1890), and the Saturday Review (1895-1898); published The quintessence of Ibsenism , 1891; wrote Widowers' Houses for performance by Independent Theatre, 1892, attacking slum landlords and allying Shaw with a realistic and political movement in the theatre; this was followed by The Philanderer (1893), Mrs Warren's Profession (1893, concerning prostitution and banned until 1902), Arms and the Man (1894), Candida (1897) and You Never Can Tell (1899); obtained first successful production of a play with The Devil's Disciple , New York, 1897; married Charlotte Payne-Townshend, 1898; wrote Captain Brassbound's Conversion for Ellen Terry, 1900; completed Caesar and Cleopatra , 1899, which was produced by Mrs Patrick Campbell in 1901; established as a playwright of international importance, with the completion and performance of Man and Superman (1901-1903), John Bull's Other Island (1904), Major Barbara (1905) and The Doctor's Dilemma (1906), which were produced by Harley Granville-Barker for the Royal Court Theatre; wrote his most popular play, Pygmalion , in 1913 (he later adapted it for the screen, winning an Academy Award in the process); during World War One, made numerous anti-war speeches; his postwar plays include Heartbreak House (1920), Back to Methuselah (1922), and St Joan (1923); won the Nobel Prize for Literature, 1925, but refused the award; established the Anglo-Swedish Literary Foundation for the translation of Swedish literature into English; wrote extensively on social, economic and political issues, notably The intelligent women's guide to socialism and capitalism (1928), and Everybody's political what's what (1944); his later plays, produced at the Malvern Festivals, included The Apple Cart (1929), Too True to be Good (1932) and Geneva (1939); retired, 1943; left residue of his estate to institute a British alphabet of at least 40 letters; died 1950.

From the guide to the SHAW, George Bernard, 1856-1950: Business Papers, 1872-1950, (British Library of Political and Economic Science)

Shaw was an Anglo-Irish dramatist and author.

From the description of Miscellaneous correspondence, 1905-1927. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 81507764

From the description of Additional papers, 1887-1932. (Harvard University, Wadsworth House). WorldCat record id: 69392009

From the description of Additional papers, 1887-1932. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612375423

From the guide to the Miscellaneous correspondence, 1905-1927., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

From the guide to the Additional papers, 1887-1932., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Irish playwright.

From the description of ALS with clipping : Brecon, Wales, to Henry Salt, 1923 July 16. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86165801

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Ayot St. Lawrence, to Blanche Patch, 1929 Dec. 15. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 603579798

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : Ayot St. Lawrence, Welwyn, Herts., to Sir Sydney Cockerell, 1940 Apr. 10. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270664526

The National Actors Theatre was founded by Tony Randall, who served as its artistic director.

From the description of Saint Joan / by Bernard Shaw, 1993. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 680898141

Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, critic, and lecturer; b. George Bernard Shaw.

From the description of George Bernard Shaw collection, 1856-1950. (Boston University). WorldCat record id: 70969529

English playwright.

From the description of Forgeries of autograph letters signed with initials (2) : Welwyn and [n.p], to an unidentified recipient, 1930 Mar. 5 and Apr. 10. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270857590

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : London, to Walter Rummel, 1937 Nov. 24. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853707

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : London, to Louise Salow, 1907 Oct. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853711

From the description of Autograph letter signed : London, to Mrs. Bland, 1887 Mar. 21. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853687

From the description of Autograph letter signed : London, to Muriel Trollope, 1916 July 1. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853694

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [n.p.], "To the R.B., S. & A.T.E. A", 1934 Oct. 5. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853697

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Welwyn, Herts., to the Postmistress of St. Lawrence, 1950 June 29. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853704

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Welwyn, Herts., to Pease, 1911 Jan. 19. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853691

From the description of Typed letter signed and autograph postal card signed : London and Welwyn, to A. Partridge, 1936 Aug. 3 and 1945 Mar. 23. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858148

From the description of Typed letter signed : London, to Kennedy Williamson, 1929 Nov. 13. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858132

From the description of Portion of a biographical sketch of Shaw : autograph corrections to a manuscript in another hand : [n.p., n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858277

From the description of Autograph correspondence card signed : London, to an unidentified recipient, 1901 Dec. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853683

From the description of Corrected proof of a letter : London, to the editor of The Nation, 1917 Mar. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270857507

From the description of Autograph letter signed : London, to an unidentified recipient, 1919 June 7. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270853700

From the description of Typed letter signed : London, to Charrington, 1914 Dec. 3. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858139

From the description of Typed letter signed : Guildford, Surrey, to Clement Scott, 1901 Jan. 3. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858145

From the description of Typed letter signed : London, to E. Lahr, 1934 Nov. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270858143

British novelist, dramatist and critic.

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : Venice, to Sylvia Pankhurst, 1931 Apr. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270664532

Born in Dublin, Ireland, on July 26, 1856, George Bernard Shaw was the only son and third and youngest child of George Carr and Lucinda Elizabeth Gurly Shaw. Though descended from landed Irish gentry, Shaw's father was unable to sustain any more than a facade of gentility. Shaw's official education consisted of being tutored by an uncle and briefly attending Protestant and Catholic day schools. At fifteen Shaw began working as a bookkeeper in a land agent's office which required him to go out among the poor to collect rent, thus giving him an early familiarity with economic injustice. Outside of work, books, theater, and art captured his attention, but it was music that pervaded his home. His mother took singing lessons from a well known Dublin music teacher who eventually moved into the Shaw household. When her teacher moved to London Shaw's mother and two sisters followed. Shaw joined them the following year at the age of twenty hoping to make a living by writing.

His first years in London, 1876-1884, were filled with frustration and poverty. Depending on his mother's income as a music teacher and a pound a week sent by his father from Dublin, Shaw spent his days in the British Museum reading room writing novels and reading, and his evenings attending lectures and debates by the middle class intelligentsia. He became a vegetarian, a socialist, a skillful orator, and developed his first beginnings as a playwright. A driving force behind the Fabian Society, he threw himself into committee work, wrote socialist pamphlets, and spoke to crowds several times a week. Shaw began his journalism career as a book reviewer and art, music, and drama critic, always downgrading the artificialities and hypocrisies he found in those arts.

Shaw remained a boarder in his mother's home until 1889, leaving only when, at the age of 42, he married Irish heiress and fellow Fabian Charlotte Payne-Townshend; the marriage lasting until her death in 1943. Though Shaw experimented with drama from his early twenties he did not see a play of his produced on stage until 1892 with Widowers' Houses, a dramatized socialist tract on slumlordism. Shaw's writings were often controversial as in The Philanderer (1898), a play about the new woman, and Mrs. Warren's Profession (1898), depicting organized commercial prostitution. His plays were often comical as well and it was not unusual to have serious themes in juxtaposition with a comedic plot. In almost everything he wrote Shaw saw his mission as that of a reformer and felt people should be able to hear important ideas discussed in the theater.

Shaw prefaced his plays with introductory essays dealing not only with the plays themselves but with the themes suggested by the plays; these essays became well known on their own. A Shaw innovation was to write stage directions and descriptions in narrative style in the texts rather than in the usual directorial form. Before a cast was selected for his plays, he would invite potential actors to come for readings and would read the play in its entirety to them acting out the parts exactly as he meant them to be performed. He also attended rehearsals where he gave helpful advice to actors having difficulty with a role.

In addition to his plays, which he continued to write into his nineties, Shaw wrote numerous essays on literary, economic, political, and social topics as well as essays, introductions, and reviews of novelists and poets, and was a prolific letter writer. He continued to be controversial when he spoke out on various issues as he was inclined to tell the truth as he saw it and could be ruthlessly honest. Shaw received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925 after the success of his play Saint Joan, and the Academy Award for Best Screenplay for Pygmalion in 1938, later made into the musical My Fair Lady (1956). George Bernard Shaw died on November 2, 1950.

From the guide to the George Bernard Shaw Collection TXRC99-A3., 1757-1963, (bulk 1875-1950), (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin)

George Bernard Shaw was born July 26, 1856, in Dublin, Ireland; he died November 2, 1950, in Ayot Saint Lawrence, Hertfordshire, England. Shaw was a renowned playwright, novelist, essayist, critic, and lecturer, whose life work was recognized through awards such as the Nobel Prize for literature, 1925; Irish Academy of Letters Medal, 1934; and the Academy Award (Oscar), Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 1938, for the screenplay of Pygmalion .

"Shaw, George Bernard." Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2003. Biography Resource Center. http://galenet.galegroup.com (accessed April 23, 2007).

Miriam Michelson (1870–1942) was an American novelist who flourished in the first half of the twentieth century.

"Miriam Michelson." Literature Online. http://lion.chadwyck.com (accessed April 18, 2007).

From the guide to the George Bernard Shaw card to Fred Terry and Miriam Michelson playscript "The Duchess Barbara [of Leeds]", 1932 April 20 and undated, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

Prominent critic and playwright, George Bernard Shaw, was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland.

In 1876 Shaw followed his mother and sister to London where he began his literary career by experimenting with short fiction, drama, and several novels (all rejected by publishers). The 1880s were a decade in which Shaw underwent extensive development. During this time he adopted socialism, became a vegetarian, developed as an orator and polemicist, and began seriously writing drama. He helped to found the Fabian Society, a middle-class socialist group which sought to transform English society, in 1884.

In addition to being a renowned critic and later playwright, Bernard Shaw is also remembered for the challenging prefaces he wrote to his plays and books. Prefaces, published in 1934, is a collection of a number of these works.

One of Shaw's greatest achievements was his invention of the theater of ideas, by insisting that the theater provide some moral instruction. In the process he also created a new genre, the serious farce. The serious farce consisted of using the techniques of comedy to advance serious views on humanity, society, and political systems. His plays, criticism, and political conscience all helped shape the theater of his time and after.

In 1898, during his recuperation from major illness, he married his unofficial nurse, Charlotte Payne-Townshend, an Irish heiress and friend of Beatrice and Sidney Webb. Their marriage lasted until Charlotte's death in 1943. Bernard Shaw died on November 2, 1950 at the age of 94.

"Shaw, George Bernard." The Dictionary of National Biography, 1941–1950. Edited by L. G. Wickham Legg and E. T. Williams. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985). Pages 773-782. "Bernard Shaw." Dictionary of Literary Biography. Volume 10. Written by Stanley Weintraub. Pages 129-148.

From the guide to the George Bernard Shaw postcard to Daphne Harwood, 1929 July 1, (University of Delaware Library - Special Collections)

British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. One of the founders of the Fabian Society, precursor of England's Socialist Party.

Artist and wood engraver [John] Frederick William Charles Farleigh (1900-1965), was born in London in 1900.

From the description of "Adventures of the black girl in her search for God" proofs, 1932. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 310629873

Irish playwright and author.

Shaw was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland. In 1876, he left Dublin for London, England, and began his writing career. His early reputation was as a journalist, critic and political ideologue especially after he joined the Fabian Society in 1884. Shaw's career as dramatist began in 1892 and he would author over fifty plays in his lifetime. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925. Shaw died in 1950.

From the description of Samuel N. Freedman collection on George Bernard Shaw, 1882-2000. (Boston College). WorldCat record id: 52632814

British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. One of the founders of the Fabian Society, precursor of England's Socialist Party.

Molly Tompkins, 1898-1960, was an aspiring American actress. She met Shaw in London in 1921 when she there to found a Shavian theater. She became a longtime friend and correspondent with Shaw.

From the description of Bernard Shaw letters to Molly (Arthur) Tompkins, 1921-1940. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 301667822

George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright and author.

Shaw was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland, and had an inconsistent education. In 1876, he left Dublin for London, England, and began his writing career. His early reputation was as a journalist, critic and political ideologue, especially after he joined the Fabian Society in 1884. Shaw's career as dramatist began in 1892. He authored over fifty plays in his lifetime. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925. Shaw died in 1950.

Bernard Partridge, British artist and actor.

Partridge was born in London, England, on October 11, 1861. He was educated at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire and later studied in the West London School of Art. In 1891, he joined the staff of Punch as a junior cartoonist. He acted under the name "Bernard Gould" and played the part of Sergius Saranoff in the 1894 performance of Shaw's "Arms and the Man". Partridge ceased acting and turned exclusively to drawing. He worked for Punch until his death in 1945.

From the description of George Bernard Shaw - Bernard Partridge letters, 1893-1928 (bulk 1894). (Boston College). WorldCat record id: 61388389

Shaw was British playwright; literary, art, and music critic; lecturer and essayist; and socialist. One of the founders of the Fabian Society, precursor of England's Socialist Party.

Evans was the foremost British photographer in the 1900s.

From the description of "Evans an appreciation" original manuscript, 1903. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 302320429

1876 left Dublin for London; 1884 joined the Fabian Society; 1885-1886 critic for Dramatic Review and Our Corner; 1885-1888 book reviewer for the Pall Mall Gazette; 1888-1889 music critic for the Star; 1890-1894 music critic for The World; 1895-1898 theatre critic for the Saturday Review; 1897-1903 vestryman and borough councillor for St Pancras, London; 1925 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Epithet: author and playwright

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000835.0x0002b7

Angna Enters was born on April 18, 1897 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Her real name was Anita Enters, which she changed into Angna [ahnjna] in the early 20s. She moved to New York as an art student and began to study dance with Michio Ito in 1920. Soon she was performing in concerts as Michio's partner. In March of 1924 Enters produced her first evening of solo performance. In the following years until 1939 she toured the US and Europe on a permanent basis presenting her program called The Theatre of Angna Enters. After 1939 she continued to give performances until late 1960s.

During this period of touring, Enters was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study Greek mime, art and music forms. She exhibited her paintings, as continued to do in following decades, and published her first autobiographical volume, First Person Plural in 1937. In 1939, she published her popular play, Love Possessed Juana, co-written with Louis Kalonyme.

Although she continued to perform into advanced age, Enters' stage career declined in the postwar years. She took up residence in California and began to pursue scriptwriting as a profession. Her account of these years, published in Silly Girl in 1944, reached the best seller list. She would go on to publish Among the Daughters (1955), Artist's Life (1958), and On Mime (1965).

After Louis Kalonyme's death in June of 1961 Enters accepted an invitation to be an artist-in-residence to the Dallas Theatre Center and Baylor University for the 1961-62 school year. She taught mime there, and spent next school year at the Wesleyan University in Connecticut. The book On Mime was the result of these years.

From 1965 to 1968 she lived as a hostess and a travel companion with her life-long friend, retired film producer Albert Lewin, whose wife died in 1965.

In 1970-71 school year she was again an artist-in-residence at Pennsylvania State University, during which she gave her last known public performance.

In 1974 she suffered a physical collapse and was moved to a nursing home. Angna Enters died on February 25, 1989 in a nursing home in Manhattan.

From the guide to the Angna Enters correspondence, 1921-1973, (The New York Public Library. Jerome Robbins Dance Division.)

George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856. He moved to London in 1876 to devote himself to writing. In London, he worked as art, music, and drama critic on various London journals. Shaw was a founding member of the Fabian Society in 1884 and edited its Fabian Essays in Socialism (1889).

Among his plays were Arms and the Man (1898); Caesar and Cleopatra (1900); Man and Superman (1903); Major Barbara (1905); Androcles and the Lion (1912); and Pygmalion (1912). Shaw also wrote novels, tracts and books on socialism, and collections of music and dramatic criticism. He received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1925. Shaw died in 1950.

(Adapted from Webster's New Biographical Dictionary (1983).)

From the guide to the Bernard Shaw Papers, 1878-1964, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 - 2 November 1950) was an Irish playwright and social commentator and thinker. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main output was dramatic, and he wrote more than 60 plays. Nearly all his writings deal with prevailing social problems and touch on issues he was concerned with.

An ardent socialist, Shaw wrote many brochures and speeches for the Fabian Society. He became an accomplished orator in the furtherance of its causes, which included gaining equal rights for men and women, alleviating abuses of the working class, rescinding private ownership of productive land and promoting healthy lifestyles. Unusually for the time he persuaded the latter by being a vegetarian.

Shaw married Charlotte Payne-Townshend, a fellow Fabian, whom he survived. Their circle included many political and artistic personalities including, Lady Nancy Astor, Auguste Rodin, TE Lawrence, Augustus John and Beatrice and Sidney Webb. They settled in Ayot St. Lawrence in Shaw's Corner having lived at several addresses and having travelled widely in Europe, Russia, South Africa and New Zealand. Shaw died there, aged 94.

He is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize for Literature (1925) and an Oscar (1938), for his contributions to literature and for his work on the film Pygmalion (adaptation of his play of the same name), respectively.

From the guide to the George Bernard Shaw Photographs, c1865-1950, (London School of Economics and Political Science, The British Library of Political and Economic Science)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Constellation Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6d50jx0
SNAC ID:
20830467

Subjects:

  • Authors, Irish--20th century--Correspondence.
  • Music
  • Documentary analysis
  • Law
  • Authors, English--Correspondence
  • Hospitals
  • Yoga
  • Theater--Production and direction
  • Motorcycles
  • Irish literature--20th century
  • Dramatists, English--20th century--Biography
  • Novelists, English--20th century
  • Lanchester automobiles
  • Fabians
  • Drama--History--Sources
  • Social classes--England.
  • Copyright--Drama
  • Vivisection
  • Dramatists, Irish--19th Century--Manuscripts
  • Biography
  • Authors, English--20th century--Archives
  • Novelists, English--20th century.
  • Socialism and theater
  • English literature--History and criticism
  • Civil law
  • Economic and social development
  • Dramatists, Irish--20th century--Archives
  • Dramatists, Irish--20th century--Correspondence
  • Authors
  • Legal systems
  • Marriage--Drama
  • Manuscripts -- Collections
  • Architecture
  • Information processing
  • Censorship
  • World War, 1914-1918--Literature and the war
  • English drama--20th century
  • Irish drama--19th century
  • Families--Drama
  • Fashion
  • Nobel Prizes
  • Music--Societies, etc.
  • Tango (Dance)
  • Tobacco habit
  • Authors and publishers--History--20th century
  • Women--Suffrage
  • Fathers and daughters--Drama
  • Dramatists--ENGLISH
  • Performing arts
  • Theater--Censorship
  • Theater--20th century
  • Theaters--Stage-setting and scenery
  • Dramatists, English
  • Drama
  • Novelists, English
  • Theatre
  • Theater Finance
  • Private libraries--20th century
  • Indexing
  • Suffrage
  • Literature
  • Radio programs
  • Art criticism
  • Dramatists, Irish--Correspondence
  • Photography
  • Theatrical posters
  • Irish literature
  • Drama--History and criticism
  • Animal abuse
  • Authors and theater
  • Manuscripts, English
  • Irish drama--20th century
  • Finance
  • Authors, Irish--19th century
  • Speech and social status.
  • Modernism (Literature)
  • Musical criticism
  • Falstaff, John, Sir (Fictitious character)
  • Dramatists, Irish--20th Century--Manuscripts
  • Travel
  • Composers--Biography
  • Dramatists, Irish--19th century
  • Drama--History and criticism.
  • English literature--20th century
  • Promptbooks
  • Man-woman relationships--Drama
  • Theater--United States
  • Vehicles
  • Dramatists
  • Literary history
  • Authors, Irish--20th century--Correspondence
  • Dramatists, Irish--20th century.
  • Speech and social status
  • Socialism
  • Theaters Attendance
  • Socialism--History--Sources
  • Dramatists, Irish--19th century.
  • Intellectual property
  • English literature--19th century
  • Theater--Great Britain.
  • Royalties
  • Copyright
  • Theater--19th century
  • Authors and publishers
  • Libel and slander
  • Authors, English
  • Authors, Irish--19th century.
  • Political science
  • Misogyny
  • Censorship--20th century--Sources
  • Automobiles--Pictorial works
  • Social classes
  • Authors, Irish--20th century--Correspondence.
  • Theater--History--20th century
  • Women's rights--History
  • Advertising--Books
  • Fabianism, England
  • Authors, Irish
  • Literary forms and genres
  • Fabianism, England.
  • Authors, English--20th century--Correspondence
  • Music--Analysis, appreciation
  • English literature --19th century.
  • Publishers and publishing
  • Artists
  • Dramatists, English--19th century--Biography
  • Visual materials
  • Triangles (Interpersonal relations)--Drama
  • Women teachers
  • Rolls-Royce automobile
  • Theater
  • Carte de visite photographs
  • Actors--19th century
  • Dramatists, Irish--19th century--Correspondence
  • Dramatists, Irish--20th century
  • Copyright--Performing rights
  • Copyright--Royalties

Occupations:

  • Photographers.
  • Dramatists.
  • Authors.
  • Dramatists, English.
  • Choreographers
  • Collectors.
  • Women composers
  • Authors, English.
  • Women dancers
  • Playwrights.
  • Authors, Irish.

Places:

  • England--Welwyn (as recorded)
  • Srinagar, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Himalaya Mountains, Tibet (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • USSR Eastern Europe (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Australia (as recorded)
  • Lake Maggiore, Piedmont and Lombardy (as recorded)
  • Mount Everest, Tibet (as recorded)
  • Afghanistan, Asia (as recorded)
  • Mayfield, Staffordshire (as recorded)
  • Bundi State, India (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Hemingby, Lincolnshire (as recorded)
  • England--London (as recorded)
  • Dean, Forest of, Gloucestershire (as recorded)
  • Gobi Desert, China (as recorded)
  • England--London (as recorded)
  • East Winch, alias Pedders Winch (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Hunza, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • West Indies, America (as recorded)
  • Le Canadel, France (as recorded)
  • Chesterfield House, London (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Guatemala, Central America (as recorded)
  • Abu, Rajputana (as recorded)
  • Arabia, Asia (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Manchuria, China (as recorded)
  • Pamir, India (as recorded)
  • London, England (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Egypt, Africa (as recorded)
  • London, England (as recorded)
  • Honduras, Central America (as recorded)
  • United States, North America (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Paris, France (as recorded)
  • Czechoslovakia Eastern Europe (as recorded)
  • Monte Carlo, Monaco (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • England--London (as recorded)
  • Horbury, West Riding of Yorkshire (as recorded)
  • Turkestan, Asia (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Battersea, Surrey (as recorded)
  • Russia, Europe, Asia (as recorded)
  • Monk's House, Sussex; home of Leonard and Virginia Woolf (as recorded)
  • Rhodesia, Africa (as recorded)
  • Waterloo, Belgium (as recorded)
  • Coningsby, Lincolnshire (as recorded)
  • Paris, France (as recorded)
  • India, Asia (as recorded)
  • Canada, North America (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Ireland (as recorded)
  • Clayworth, Nottinghamshire (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union, Asia (as recorded)
  • Chitral State, India (as recorded)
  • Tonk State, India (as recorded)
  • Rhode Island--Providence (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Denshawaï, Egypt (as recorded)
  • Sutton-le-Marsh, Lincolnshire (as recorded)
  • Borneo, Indonsesia (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • South Africa, Africa (as recorded)
  • London, England (as recorded)
  • Les Baux, Bouches-du-Rhône (as recorded)
  • Walkeringham, Nottinghamshire (as recorded)
  • China, Asia (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Rheims, Marne (as recorded)
  • Cambrai, France (as recorded)
  • Greenwich, Kent (as recorded)
  • Indore State, India (as recorded)
  • Bhutan, Asia (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Central Asia, Asia (as recorded)
  • Tibet, Asia (as recorded)
  • Versailles, Seine-et-Oise (as recorded)
  • Trusthorpe, Lincolnshire (as recorded)
  • Mustagh Pass, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Preston, Lancashire (as recorded)
  • Gilgit, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • London, England (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • England--London (as recorded)
  • Gulmarg, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire (as recorded)
  • Athens, Greece (as recorded)
  • Madeira (Madeira Islands) (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Strait of Lepanto, Greece (as recorded)
  • Tenterden, Kent (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • South Africa, Africa (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Colworth House, Bedford (as recorded)
  • Iceland, Europe (as recorded)
  • Hackney, Middlesex (as recorded)
  • North-West Frontier, India (as recorded)