Edison, Thomas Alva, 1847-1931

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1847-02-11
Death 1931-10-18
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

xmlns="urn:isbn:1-931666-33-4">Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) was the most prolific American inventor to date. This collection contains typescript reproductions of his laboratory notebooks recording research for a domestic source of natural rubber sponsored by his Edison Botanic Research Corp. of Fort Myers. The company was founded in Florida by Edison, Harvey Firestone and Henry Ford. In collaboration with John Kunkel Small (1869-1938) of the New York Botanical Garden, over 17,000 plants were tested. Solidago (Goldenrod) was determined to be the best source. Experiments continued after Edison's and Small's deaths until World War II when the development of synthetic rubber eliminated the need for local sources. The records of the Edison Botanic Research Corp. were transferred to the Edison National Historic Site. In 1963 Mrs. Lillian Roth of Irvington, N.J. transcribed the laboratory notes related to this project from the microfilm. She presented it to Harold Moldenke who transferred it to the New York Botanical Garden.

From the description of Thomas Alva Edison papers 1880-1964. (New York Botanical Garden). WorldCat record id: 42306873

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w66z0150
Ark ID:
w66z0150
SNAC ID:
83869476

Subjects:

  • Telegraph--Research
  • Solidago--Industrial applications
  • Rubber plants--Utilization
  • Sound recordings--Technological innovations
  • Electric lighting
  • Natural history
  • Southwest Indians
  • Storage batteries
  • Group work in research--19th century
  • Electric lamps--19th century
  • Businessmen--Sources
  • Bamboo--Utilization
  • Electric industries
  • Instrumentation
  • Electrification--History--Sources
  • Inventions
  • Oneida Indians
  • Cigarettes
  • Sound recordings and the arts
  • Beyond Early America
  • Goldenrods--Industrial applications
  • Inventors--Sources
  • Rubber--Research
  • Arctic Indians
  • Penobscot Indians
  • Inventors
  • Cayuga Indians
  • Telegraph--Patents
  • Sound Recordings
  • Eastern Woodlands Indians
  • Iroquois Indians
  • Motion picture cameras--Technological innovations
  • Onondaga Indians
  • Early National Politics
  • Electric industries--History
  • Ojibwa Indians
  • Platinum mines and mining--British Columbia
  • Platinum mines and mining
  • Motion pictures--Technological innovations
  • Colonial Politics
  • Patents
  • Motion pictures
  • Inventors--19th century--Autographs
  • Iron industry and trade
  • Electric vehicles
  • Magnetism
  • Optics
  • United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783
  • Electricity
  • Carbon--Industrial applications
  • Isleta Indians
  • Physics--History
  • History of science and technology
  • Technology
  • Mohawk Indians
  • Rubber plants--Research
  • Motion picture cameras
  • Inuit--Canada
  • Iron ores--Magnetic properties--Industrial applications
  • Portland cement manufacturing
  • X-rays
  • Communication in science--19th century
  • Silver question
  • Pens
  • Tuscarora Indians
  • Inventors--Correspondence
  • Industrial research
  • Motion pictures in education
  • Incandescent lamps--Technological innovations
  • Phonograph
  • Scientists
  • Electrochemistry
  • Oregon
  • Seneca Indians
  • Inventors--20th century--Autographs

Occupations:

  • Industrialists
  • Scientists
  • Electric engineers
  • Inventors

Places:

  • Milan, OH, US
  • Menlo Park, NJ, US
  • West Orange, NJ, US
  • Port Huron, MI, US