New York Public Library

Alternative names
Americans
Italian, English, Latin

History notes:

The New York Pubic Library purchased Arthur A. Schomburg's collection of books, pamphlets, prints and photographs in 1926 with funds from the Carnegie Corporation and housed at the 135th Street Branch Library of The New York Public Library. L. Hollingsworth Wood was appointed in 1925 by the Board of Trustees of The New York Public Library to purchase and provide guidelines for the Schomburg Collection of Negro Literature. Members of the Advisory Committee of the Arthur A. Schomburg Collection, in addition to Wood, included Arthur A. Schomburg, Henry G. Leach, New York Public Library, Mrs. Charles S. Brown, Jr., Library trustee; and Eugene Kinckle Jones, Secretary of the National Urban League. Charles S. Johnson, editor of "Opportunity" magazine, managed the negotiations between the officials of the National Urban League and Mr. Schomburg. The 135th Street Branch Library, under the guidance of Ernestine Rose, the Head Librarian, already had a nucleus of a reference library, the Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints that had officially opened on May 8, 1925. The Schomburg Collection became a major part of this reference library.

From the description of Schomburg Committee of the Trustees of New York Public Library collection, 1925-1940. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122570651

From the guide to the Schomburg Committee of the Trustees of New York Public Library collection, 1925-1940, (The New York Public Library. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division.)

Visual materials documenting the history of the New York Public Library have been brought together to form Record Group 10.

From the description of New York Public Library Visual Materials, 1875- (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122466150

In 1895, the Astor Library and the Lenox Library were consolidated with the Tilden Trust to form the New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations. The Astor Library was a public reference library begun in 1839 and incorporated ten years later under the will of John Jacob Astor (1763-1848). The Lenox Library, founded in 1870, was made up of the collections of rare books and manuscripts, especially Bibles, early printing, Americana, and voyages and travels formed by James Lenox (1800-1880). To this was added a $2 million endowment and 15,000 volumes from the trust of political leader Samuel J. Tilden (1814-1886). While the New York Public Library is a private corporation its charter stipulates it to be both free and open to all. The Library is organized into 4 groups: the Board of Trustees, Central Administration, Research Libraries, and Branch Libraries. The directors of both the Research and Branch Libraries report to the Central Administration which is headed by the Director of the Library who reports to the President and the Board of Trustees. After consolidation, both the Astor and Lenox Libraries continued to operate separately until the opening of the Central Building in 1911. Initially, John Shaw Billings (the Library's first Director) handled many of the functions which would become the responsibility of the director of the Research Libraries. Between 1901 and 1906, 14 already extant free circulating libraries (including the Aguilar Free Library, Cathedral Library, and the New York Free Circulating Library) were united to form the nucleus of the branch libraries. Andrew Carnegie's 1901 gift established the financial foundation of the branch system which serves three of the five New York City Boroughs: the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

From the guide to the Artifacts and Memorabilia Collection, ca. 1896-2001, (The New York Public Library. New York Public Library Archives.)

In 1895, the Astor Library and the Lenox Library were consolidated with the Tilden Trust to form the New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations.

The Astor Library was a public reference library begun in 1839 and incorporated ten years later under the will of John Jacob Astor (1763-1848). The Lenox Library, founded in 1870, was made up of the collections of rare books and manuscripts, especially Bibles, early printing, Americana, and voyages and travels formed by James Lenox (1800-1880). To this was added a $2 million endowment and 15,000 volumes from the trust of political leader Samuel J. Tilden (1814-1886). While the New York Public Library is a private corporation its charter stipulates it to be both free and open to all. The Library is organized into 4 groups: the Board of Trustees, Central Administration, Research Libraries, and Branch Libraries. The directors of both the Research and Branch Libraries report to the Central Administration which is headed by the Director of the Library who reports to the President and the Board of Trustees. After consolidation, both the Astor and Lenox Libraries continued to operate separately until the opening of the Central Building in 1911. Initially, John Shaw Billings (the Library's first Director) handled many of the functions which would become the responsibility of the director of the Research Libraries.

Between 1901 and 1906, 14 already extant free circulating libraries (including the Aguilar Free Library, Cathedral Library, and the New York Free Circulating Library) were united to form the nucleus of the branch libraries. Andrew Carnegie's 1901 gift established the financial foundation of the branch system which serves three of the five New York City Boroughs: the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

From the description of New York Public Library Agency History. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122431289

The New York Public Library was formed in 1895 through the consolidation of the Astor Library, the Lenox Library and the Tilden Trust. The Astor Library was a public reference library begun in 1839 and incorporated ten years later under the will of John Jacob Astor (1763-1848). The Lenox Library, founded in 1870, was made up of the collections of rare books and manuscripts, especially Bibles, early printing, Americana, and voyages and travels formed by James Lenox (1800-1880). To this was added a $2 million endowment and 15,000 volumes from the trust of political leader Samuel J. Tilden (1814-1886).

While the New York Public Library is a private corporation its charter stipulates it to be both free and open to all. The Library is organized into four groups: the Board of Trustees, Central Administration, Research Libraries, and Branch Libraries. The directors of both the Research and Branch Libraries report to the Central Administration which is headed by the Director of the Library who reports to the President and the Board of Trustees.

After consolidation, both the Astor and Lenox Libraries continued to operate separately until the opening of the Central Building in 1911. Initially, John Shaw Billings (The Library's first Director) handled many of the functions which would become the responsibility of the director of the Research Libraries. Between 1901 and 1906, 14 already extant free circulating libraries (including the Aguilar Free Library, Cathedral Library, and the New York Free Circulating Library) were united to form the nucleus of the branch libraries. Andrew Carnegie's 1901 gift established the financial foundation of the branch system which serves three of the five New York City Boroughs: the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

From the guide to the New York Public Library Visual Materials, 1875-, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

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Subjects:

  • Library architecture
  • Research libraries--New York (State)--New York
  • Libraries--Employees
  • Library buildings--New York (State)--New York
  • Vocal duets with piano
  • World War, 1914-1918--War work--New York (State)--New York
  • Judges--Correspondence
  • Young adults' libraries--New York (State)--New York
  • Judges--Portraits
  • Songs with piano
  • Judges--New York (State)--Correspondence
  • Motets--17th century
  • Research libraries--Reference services
  • Children's libraries--New York (State)--New York
  • Dance--Early works to 1800
  • Parades
  • Children's libraries
  • Madrigals, Italian--17th century
  • Branch libraries
  • World War, 1914-1918--War work
  • Libraries
  • Sacred vocal music--17th century
  • World War, 1939-1945--Libraries
  • Young adults' libraries
  • Theater
  • Music--Manuscripts
  • Judges--United States--Portraits
  • Dramatic criticism
  • Library architecture--New York (State)--New York
  • Parades--New York (State)--New York
  • Dance--History--Sources
  • Public libraries
  • Library employees--New York (State)--New York
  • Operas--Excerpts, Arranged--Scores
  • Libraries--New York (State)--New York
  • Research libraries
  • Dance music--15th century
  • Library buildings
  • Libraries--Branches, delivery stations, etc

Occupations:

not available for this record

Functions:

not available for this record

Places:

  • United States, 00, US
  • New York City, NY, US
  • New York, NY, US