Persichetti, Vincent, 1915-1987

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1915-06-06
Death 1987-08-14
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Texts are six of Aesop's fables. Composed 1943. First performance Philadelphia, 20 April 1945, Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy conductor, Robert Grooters narrator.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Fables : for narrator and orchestra, 1943 / Vincent Persichetti. 1943. (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180868

Commissioned by Anthony di Bonaventura. Composed 1962. First performance Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 2 August 1964, Dartmouth Symphony, Mario di Bonaventura conductor, Anthony di Bonaventura soloist.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Concerto for piano and orchestra / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180860

American composer.

From the description of Autograph note signed, dated : [n.p.], to Robert Merritt Allen, 1980 Nov. 28. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270911584

From the description of Little piano book. Album leaf. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270919864

From the description of Interview conducted by Oliver Daniel, Dec. 6, 1977 [sound recording]. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 155861499

Commissioned by the Louisville Philharmonic Society. Composed 1953. First performance Louisville, Kentucky, 28 August 1954, The Louisville Orchestra, Robert Whitney conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Symphony for strings / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180905

John de Lancie, American oboist and educator (Principal oboe, Philadelphia orchestra; Faculty, Director, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia; Dean, New World School of the Arts, Miami, Fla.), was a classmate of Persichetti's at the Curtis Institute.

From the description of [Letter] 1970 Nov. 23, the Juilliard School, New York, N.Y. [to] John [de Lancie, Wynnewood, Pa.] / Vincent. (Curtis Institute of Music). WorldCat record id: 50606812

Composed 1940. First performance Rochester, 23 October 1945, Eastman-Rochester Symphony Orchestra, Howard Hanson conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Concertino : for piano and orchestra / Vincent Persichetti. 1940. (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180858

Composed 1951. First performance Philadelphia, 17 December 1954, Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Fourth symphony / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53181125

Commissioned by the St. Louis Symphony Society on its 80th anniversary. Composed 1959. First performance St. Louis, 24 October 1959, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Edouard van Remoortel conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Seventh symphony / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180936

Composed 1950. First performance Philadelphia, 31 March 1951, Philadelphia Orchestra, Alexander Hilsberg conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Fairy tale : for orchestra / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180885

Commissioned by the Louisville Philharmonic Society. Composed 1950. First performance Louisville, Kentucky, 15 November 1950, The Louisville Orchestra, Robert Whitney conductor.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Serenade no. 5 : for orchestra / Vincent Persichetti. [19--] (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 53180894

Commissioned by the HiIlsberg Estate for The Philadelphia Orchestra.--Cf. Fleisher Collection.

From the description of Sinfonia Janiculum = Symphony no. 9 / Vincent Persichetti. [19--]. (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 74818203

Vincent Persichetti (1915-1987) was an American composer, educator, author, editor, and pianist.

In 1921, at the age of six, he was admitted to the Combs Conservatory of Music and made his first appearance in a piano recital. He later studied the piano with Olga Samaroff and composition with Paul Nordoff at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, and conducting with Fritz Reiner at the Curtis Institute of Music. In 1947 he joined the faculty of the Juilliard School, with which he was associated until the time of his death. Persichetti had many composition students there, notably Steve Reich and Peter Schickele. Prominent among his works are the opera, The Sybil (1976), the oratorio, The Creation (1970), nine symphonies, numerous piano pieces and chamber works in addition to several substantial works for band. His twenty five Parables (1965-1986) span the genres from unaccompanied solo instrumental works to opera. From 1952 he served as an editorial director for the music publisher, Elkan-Vogel. Persichetti also wrote extensively, including the book, Twentieth-Century Harmony (1961), which often has been cited as the definitive work on modern compositional techniques. Throughout his career, Persichetti was the recipient of numerous awards as well as the subject of many critical studies, including an unpublished work by his wife and fellow composer, Dorothea Flanagan Persichetti.

From the description of Vincent Persichetti papers, 1901-1996 (bulk 1930-1987) (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 79460295

Vincent Persichetti was born in Philadelphia on June 6, 1915 to Martha Catherine Buch and Vincent Roger Persichetti. From the age of two, when he began asking for piano lessons, he showed a strong determination to progress from novice to expert in the musical world. Whether it was as a composer, pianist or double bass musician, he sought out individuals and organizations during his early years (1915-1932) that would advance his musical knowledge and performance skills. In 1921, at the age of six, he was admitted to Combs Conservatory of Music and made his first appearance in a piano recital. In 1922, he added to his lessons by enrolling in theory classes at the Conservatory with Russell King Miller. These additonal studies prepared him for his first radio performance as a pianist in 1925, in his role as a pianist for the Candle Light Trio in 1928, for the Matinee Musical Club Orchestra from 1926-1929, to win the National Federation of Music Clubs’ first prize for original composition in 1930, and to play principal double bass in the All Philadelphia High School Orchestra in 1931.

It was during his adult years, however, that Persichetti established lasting professional working relationships. In 1932, he was appointed organist of the Arch Street Presbyterian Church (1932-1948), and in 1933, the same year that he graduated from South Philadelphia High School, he was appointed conductor of the Combs Conservatory Orchestra (1933-1936). Furthermore, one year after earning his Bachelor of Music Degree in Composition from the Combs Conservatory, Persichetti was appointed Head of the Theory and Composition Department at his alma mater (a position he held from 1937-1941). Persichetti then moved on to the position as the Head of Philadelphia Conservatory’s department of Theory and Composition from 1941-1962. Soon after starting this position, Persichetti joined the faculty of Juilliard in 1947 (Head of Composition department from 1963-1973 and in 1970 appointed Director of the school’s Literature and Materials department and remained a member of the faculty until his death). In addition to these responsibilities, Persichetti entered the world of music publishing in his role as Director of Publication for Elkan Vogel Inc (Theodore Presser) in 1952.

As Persichetti composed prodigiously for nearly every musical medium, his numerous work related responsibilities did not interrupt his studies, his composing, nor his personal endeavors. In 1938, he studied the standard orchestral literature with Fritz Reiner at Curtis Institute and, subsequently, earned his diploma in conducting (also under the tutelage of Fritz Reiner) from this organization in 1939. In 1941, he married Dorothea Flanagan, a fellow music student. From this marriage, two children were born: a daughter in 1944 named Lauren and a son in 1946 named Garth. During the years of 1941-1945, he studied piano with Samaroff and composition with Nordoff at the Philadelphia Conservatory (MMus 1941, DMus 1945); for a three-week period in 1943, Persichetti studied with Roy Harris in Colorado. In 1954, he coauthored the book William Schuman with Flora Rheta Schreiber and in 1961 independently authored Twentieth Century Harmony .

His work ethic and musical excellence garnered him awards and citations from organizations. The following is an abbreviated list: the Juilliard Publication Award in 1943 for his Dance Overture, the 1945 Blue Network Chamber Award for his Second String Quartet, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1958, the 1959 Star of Solidarity Medal from the Italian Government for contribution to American culture, the 1964 Edwin Franko Goldman Memorial Citation, the 1966 Symphony League award, 1966 Honorary doctorate from Baldwin Wallace College, 1967 Citation of Honor from the National Catholic Music Educators Association, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1968, a 1970 Honorary doctorate from Bucknell University and Combs College, 1973 Orpheus Award from Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity, 1973 Cultural Hall of Fame (South Philadelphia High School), a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1973, Honorary Doctorates from Peabody Conservatory and Milliken University in 1974, 1975 Brandeis University Creative Arts Award, Citation from the City of Philadelphia, 1978 First Kennedy Center Friedheim Award for Excellence in Symphonic Composition (for English Horn Concerto), represented US through ASCAP at the International Composers Meetings in the Soviet Union of the International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers in 1979, an Honorary member of the American Bandmasters Association in 1979, the 1981 Philadelphia Art Alliance Award for Distinguished Achievement, the 1981 Hazlett Memorial Award, the 1981 American Institute for Italian Culture Presidential Award of Merit, the 1987 College Band Directors National Association Distinguished Service Award, grants from the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Vincent Persichetti, considered by many to be one of the leading American composers of the Twentieth Century, died on August 14, 1987. Some of Mr. Persichetti’s accomplished students included prominent composers Jacob Druckman, Philip Glass, Steve Reich and Peter Schickele.

"Persichetti, Vincent." Retrieved from http://www.grovemusic.com on March1, 2005. Personal Papers-Box 2, folders 4-14 “Vincent Persichetti.” Retrieved from http://www.presser.com/Composers/info.cfm?Name=VINCENTPERSICHETTI on March 1, 2005. New York Times Obituary.“Vincent Persichetti Dies at 72; Composer of Wide Repertory,” Proquest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1857-Current file): Aug. 15, 1987, p.33. “Composers of Great Band Works” by Dr. Brian Harris. Retrieved from http://www.bandroom.com/BCP/resources/ComposerSeries/Vpers.pdf on March 1, 2005.

From the guide to the Vincent Persichetti papers, 1901-1996, 1930-1987, (The New York Public Library. Music Division.)

Vincent Persichetti was an American composer, virtuoso pianist, and music teacher. Born in Philadelphia in 1915, Persichetti studied piano, organ, double bass, tuba, conducting, music theory and composition.

There have been few more universally admired twentieth-century American composers than Vincent Persichetti. His contributions have enriched the entire musical literature and his influence as performer and teacher is immeasurable.

He received his musical education at the Combs College of Music, where he studied composition under Russel King Miller. At the age of twenty, he served as the head of the Combs College theory and composition departments. He also studied conducting at the Curtis Institute with Fritz Reiner, studied piano at the Philadelphia Conservatory with Olga Samaroff, and studied composition with various other important American composers.

He received a Diploma in Conducting from the Curtis Institute and Music Masters and Music Doctorate degrees from the Philadelphia Conservatory.

Persichetti was appointed head of the Philadelphia Conservatory theory and composition departments in 1941, the same year he married pianist Dorothea Flanagan. In 1963, he became the chairman of the Juilliard School of Music composition department. He appeared as guest conductor, lecturer and composer at over 200 universities.

Persichetti composed for nearly every musical medium, and is well know for his wide range of compositional styles.

From the guide to the Vincent Persichetti collection of noncommercial recordings, 1940-1987, (The New York Public Library. Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound.)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w69022r2
Ark ID:
w69022r2
SNAC ID:
31813710

Subjects:

  • Suites (Orchestra)--Scores and parts
  • Sonatas (Violoncello)
  • Sonatas (Pianos (2))--Scores
  • Music publishing
  • Choruses, Secular (Women's voices, 2 parts) with piano
  • Music publishing--Pennyslvania--Philadelphia
  • Chorale preludes (Band)
  • Suites (Violin and piano)--Scores and parts
  • Composers--20th century
  • Flute music
  • Piano music
  • Concertos (Piano)--Scores and parts
  • Orchestral music--Scores
  • Trumpet music (Trumpets (2))--Scores
  • Trumpet with string orchestra--Solo with piano
  • Music teachers--United States--20th century
  • Violin and piano music--Scores and parts
  • Dance music--Scores and parts
  • Trumpet music
  • Symphonies (String orchestra)--Scores and parts
  • Monologues with music (Orchestra)--Scores
  • Music teachers--20th century
  • Symphonies--Scores and parts
  • Choruses, Secular (Men's voices, 2 parts) with piano
  • Choruses, Secular (Mixed voices, 2 parts) with piano
  • Monologues with music (Orchestra)--Scores and parts
  • Music--Manuscripts--Facsimiles
  • Composers--United States--20th century
  • Orchestral music
  • Orchestral music--Scores and parts
  • Piccolo music
  • Music--Manuscripts

Occupations:

  • Music teachers
  • Composers

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • Pennsylvania--Philadelphia (as recorded)