Tufts, James Hayden, 1862-1942

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1862
Death 1942

Biographical notes:

Tufts was educated at Amherst College, A.B., 1884; M.A., 1889; D.B., Yale, 1889; Ph. D. Freiburg, 1892. He taught philosophy at the University of Michigan, 1889-1891 and at the University of Chicago, 1892-1930 and wrote extensively on philosophical topics.

From the description of Tufts papers, 1785-1942. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 52034227

James H. Tufts was born on July 9, 1862 in Monson, Massachusetts. Tufts graduated from Amherst College in 1884 and remained there to teach mathematics for two years. He entered Yale Divinity School and in 1889 was awarded a Bachelor of Divinity degree. In 1890, Tufts received his M.A. from Amherst College and accepted a position as an instructor of philosophy at the University of Michigan where he became a colleague of John Dewey. In 1891, Tufts went to Germany for post-graduate study and obtained his Ph. D. from the University of Freiburg in 1892. Following his studies in Germany, Tufts resumed his teaching career (1892) at the University of Chicago as an assistant professor of philosophy. He remained at Chicago's Department of Philosophy in various capacities for the next thirty-eight years. In 1894 he was promoted to associate professor and to professor in 1900, and from 1906 until his retirement in 1930, Tufts was chairman of the philosophy department. Tufts played an important part in the development of the philosophy department at the University of Chicago and in the creation of the "Chicago School of Instrumental Philosophy." He began to break away from classical philosophy and theology, but not without retaining a profound respect for much of "the great inheritance." Thus, in his writings, he tended to preserve traditional forms while presenting the claims of a new generation. Tufts served as an editor of The International Journal of Ethics (1914-1934), and served as president of the American Philosophy Association (Western Division 1914, and Pacific Division, 1934). Known for his socially progressive ideas, he was selected as chairman of two local boards of arbitration and became a spokesman for Chicago social workers when they sought new legislation. James Tufts died in Berkeley, California on August 5, 1942, at the age of 80.

From the description of James H. Tufts papers, 1782-1942. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 276988500

Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Chicago, 1892-1930; Dean of Faculties and Vice-President of the University, 1924-1926; Acting President, 1925-1926.

From the description of Papers, 1908-1942. (University of Chicago Library). WorldCat record id: 52246245

James Hayden Tufts was born in Monson, Masachusetts on July 9, 1862 and prepared for college at Monson Academy under his father. He graduated from Amherst College in 1884 and took a position as principal of Westport, Connecticut High School for one year. After that he taught mathematics at Amherst College for two years then became a student again at Yale University, 1887-1889. He was instructor in philosophy at the University of Michigan, 1889-1891, and then attended the Universities of Berlin and Freiburg, Germany, receiving his Ph.D. from the latter in 1892. From there he went to the University of Chicago to teach philosophy, where he remained for the rest of his career, holding many important positions including that of acting president. He died on August 5, 1942 at Berkeley, California.

From the guide to the James Hayden Tufts (AC 1884) Papers, 1764-1940, (Amherst College Archives and Special Collections)

In 1891, Tufts went to Germany for post-graduate study and obtained his Ph. D. from the University of Freiburg in 1892. Following his studies in Germany, Tufts resumed his teaching career (1892) at the University of Chicago as an assistant professor of philosophy. He remained at Chicago's Department of Philosophy in various capacities for the next thirty-eight years. In 1894 he was promoted to associate professor and to professor in 1900, and from 1906 until his retirement in 1930, Tufts was chairman of the philosophy department.

For nearly half of his eighty years Tufts played an important part in the development of the philosophy department at the University of Chicago and in the creation of the "Chicago School of Instrumental Philosophy." Tufts served as an editor of The International Journal of Ethics (1914-1934). He contributed also to a number of symposia and served as president of the American Philosophy Association (Western Division 1914, and Pacific Division, 1934). James H. Tufts was married to Cynthia H. Whitaker in 1891 and had two children, Irene (Mead) and James Warren. Cynthia Tufts died in 1920; he later married Matilde Castro, a professor of education at Bryn Mawr. Tufts died in Berkeley, California on August 5, 1942, at the age of 80.

From the description of James H. Tufts photograph collection, 1890-1930. (Southern Illinois University). WorldCat record id: 320369413

James Hayden Tufts (1862-1942) was on the faculty of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago from 1892-1930. In 1905 he was appointed Chairman of the Philosophy Department, a position he held until his retirement from the University in 1930. In addition to departmental duties, he was Dean of the Senior Colleges (1898-1904), Dean of Faculties and Vice-President of the University (1924-26), Acting President of the University (1925-26), and editor of the International Journal of Ethics (1914-1930).

Born in Monson, Massachusetts, James Tufts was educated at his father's grammar school and subsequently at Amherst College (B.A., 1883), Yale Divinity School (B.D., 1889), and the University of Freiburg (Ph.D., 1892). After graduating from Yale, he accepted a teaching position in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Michigan. During a holiday visit to his home in Massachusetts, he received an invitation to call on his former professor, William Rainey Harper, at Yale. Sharing with Tufts his plans for a new university in Chicago, Harper invited him to join the faculty. Tufts resigned from the University of Michigan, married Cynthia Whitaker, and set sail for Germany to begin one year of study at the University of Freiburg, with the agreement that he would be in Chicago, prepared to teach, by August, 1892. While in Germany, Tufts and Harper corresponded frequently [Tufts' letters to Harper, dating from 1890-92, are in Box XV, Folder 12 of the William Rainey Harper Personal Papers]. At Harper's request, Tufts provided information about various candidates for positions at the University, and he advised Harper on acquisitions for the Philosophy Library.

From the guide to the Tufts, James Hayden. Papers, 1908-1942, (Special Collections Research Center University of Chicago Library 1100 East 57th Street Chicago, Illinois 60637 U.S.A.)

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Subjects:

  • Philosophy--Study and teaching
  • Philosophy, American
  • Philosophers--Biography--Sources
  • Philosophers--United States--Biography--Sources
  • Philosophers
  • Social reformers
  • Social legislation
  • Housing

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  • United States (as recorded)
  • Illinois (as recorded)